Tres Culturas, Mexico City

4 out of 5 stars 10 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Tres Culturas
    by malianrob
  • Tres Culturas
    by malianrob
  • Tres Culturas
    by malianrob
  • patricia1.nunez's Profile Photo

    plaza de las tres culturas and Tlatelolco museum

    by patricia1.nunez Written Apr 14, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Name says that all: three cultures..
    1st. Tlatelolco archeological site: was the most important commercial center in the Prehispanic Mexico...temples, altars and a palace are components on this amazing site I Liked better than the one in Zocalo (Templo mayor) is very well preserve
    2nd.Tlatelolco church: you can have an idea of Spaniards efforts to convert natives into catoliscism, by bulding a church on top of their city.
    3erd. An homage to all fallen in the 1968 student manifestation against goverment policies that involved also all kind of workers demanding better job conditions and asking for liberation on politic prisoners..this place has an extrange vibe as you can tell many people had died in this explanade over the years...
    Next to Archeological site there is a buliding currently being renovated that used to belong to Secretaria de realciones exteriores de Mexico ,that is being transformed to be a cultural center offering language classes, and many cultural events,, this venue houses a nice lobby and also 1 little museum on the 2nd floor.. the museum stand for all mexican art, mostly paintings from 1920´s to todays,, that was nice.. also the nicest is that they are holding a photographical exposition about Taltelolco 68 with original propaganda and pics..also videos of what happenned are displayed.. another expo shows Praga´s spring back in 1968 where shows all related to URSS ocupation to the city..Hopping if you go they still available,, free entrance by Flores Magon st..

    Was this review helpful?

  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Plaza de las Tres Culturas

    by filipdebont Updated Oct 13, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plaza de las Tres Culturas

    This Plaza symbolizes the 3 different Cultures of Mexico: Pre-Columbian Culture, Spanish Culture and the Modern Culture. On this picture you can see two of these cultures, an Aztec symbol, ruins of ancient pyramids of Tlatelolco, the twin city of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, and in the background the modern buildings.

    Was this review helpful?

  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Modern Culture

    by filipdebont Updated Oct 13, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plaza de las tres culturas

    The third Culture at the Plaza de las Tres Culturas is the Modern Culture. This is symbolized by a big almost completely empty square surrounded by modern buildings. There is a statue which remembers the bloodbath that happened here in October 1968, when the military opened fire at a group of demonstrating students, more then hundred students died, this must be surely be one of the darkest pages in the Mexican history . . .

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Tlatelolco

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jan 22, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tlatelco
    4 more images

    Just North of the city center is this Aztec Temple ruin of the aztec city of Tlatelolco. These are by far the best preserved ruins in the city. It's a bit of a walk from the nearest metro but is well worth a trip

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Spanish culture

    by filipdebont Updated Oct 13, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Santiago Church

    A second Culture at the plaza de las tres Culturas : The Spanish built here their own temple, the Santiago Church. This church is built in the 16th century, in that time churches were built in a kind of style as they build fortresses.

    Was this review helpful?

  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    Plaza de las Tres Culturas

    by malianrob Updated Sep 20, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    We came here because our driver asked us if we wanted to check this place out. He said it was a mix of three cultures here: the precolonial, colonial era, and modern cultures or Aztec, Spanish, and contemporary Mexican cultures.
    This was a location where alot of bloodshed has taken place. The last having been not that long ago. I was told that in 1968 there were many protesters here. It was during the Olympics from what I heard and the government masacred the protesters. The bodies were all picked up and desposed off and the next day the media, newspapers, tv news channels, no one had anything to say about what happened. I was told that to this day no one really knows how many people, the the names of everyone that were killed that day. There is a memorial there now in honor of those who have passed away.
    At this location there is also the remains of the Aztec city of Tlatelolco. This is where the last battle took place to conquest Mexico in 1521.
    There is also a church located here. We were here when the rain started pouring down and we were invited to stay inside the church while a couple got married. We were very honored. The church is rather simple in appearance but it is made entirely from volcanic rock. It was contructed in the 16th century.

    Was this review helpful?

  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Tlaltelolco

    by darthmilmo Written Feb 25, 2003

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tlaltelolco

    I then headed to Tlatelolco where I walked in the historic "Plaza de las Tres Culturas (Plaza of the Three Cultures)." The plaza was named in honor of the three cultures that left a mark here: Aztec, Colonial Spanish, and Modern Mexico. The plaza has interesting ruins. The main pyramid on the ruins was ran-sacked by Spaniards to erect the Iglesia de San Francisco. On a more profound note, the plaza has a plague commemorating the 1968 Massacre of Tlaltelolco. The event occurred shortly before the 1968 Summer Olympics held the city. The students and protestors where gunned down and many lives were lost in the event. A similar atrocity occurred in Tiananmen Square, Beijing in 1989.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Aptypo's Profile Photo

    Tlatelolco, or the bloody history of Mexico.

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 7, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plaza de las Tres Culturas

    Tlatelolco.
    Plaza de las Tres Culturas.
    (Three Cultures Square).

    Plaza de Las Tres Culturas is a symbol of modern Mexico and its fusion of pre-Hispanic and colonial cultures, this place holds a special place in the history of Mexico, and in the hearts and minds of the people.

    There are ruins of a pre-Columbian ceremonial centre of Tlatelolco, symbol of the ancient Aztec culture.
    Iglesia de Santiago (Santiago Church) dates back to 1524 (although it was rebuilt in 1609), there is the baptismal fountain of Juan Diego, the indian to whom, according to tradition, the Virgen de Guadalupe de Guadalupe appeared in 1531; there is also Colegio de la Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz College,1535) and both buildings stand as a symbol of Spanish colonial presence.
    Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (Department of Foreign Affairs) and other modern buildings line the square exhibiting the third and current culture of Mexico today.

    Tlatelolco was the site of the biggest marketplace in the Valley of Mexico and the last stronghold of the Aztecs in their defeat to the Spaniards.

    The bloody history of this place began with Cortés and the Aztecs (August 13, 1521), continues through the student massacre (October 2, 1968), and ends with the recent disclosure by the National Security Archive of the USA secret documents concerning 1968 from the files of the CIA, FBI and the USA Defense Department.

    The square is primarily remembered for the massacre that occurred here 35 years ago (October 2, 1968), when hundreds of students were killed as the government suppressed their political protests so that the world would not see any unrest during the Olympic games held in Mexico during next weeks.

    Was this review helpful?

  • The Plaza of Three Cultures...

    by ChicaAmable Written Aug 24, 2002

    The Plaza of Three Cultures represents three periods in Mexico's history. There is a Spanish colonial church, pre-Columbian Aztec ruins, and modern apartment buildings in the same area. The Plaza is located in a part of Mexico City called Tlatelolco, named after the indian city that was formerly on this site. In 1968, civilian demonstrators and Mexican troops clashed in a massacre at Tlatelolco which is said to have killed hundreds.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Plaza de las Tres Culturas

    by Jim_Eliason Written Dec 28, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plaza de las Tres Culturas
    2 more images

    Next to Tlatelolco, the plaza of the Templo de Santiago is known as the plaza of the 3 cultures that make up Mexico; Spanish, Indian and Mestizo

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Mexico City

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

93 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Tres Culturas
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
0.3 miles away
Show Prices
Show Prices

View all Mexico City hotels