Xochimilco, Mexico City

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  • Some of the wildlife you can see here
    Some of the wildlife you can see here
    by Laura_Mexico
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    Greenhouses with flowers & plants for...
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  • "Trajineras" sailing in Xochimilco
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  • Mexgirl's Profile Photo

    Parties on Water

    by Mexgirl Updated Aug 20, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Xochimilco
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    This place is called Xochimilco, where in ancient times, was a commerce-Lake where people used to trade their mercancies in small boats called "Trajineras".

    Now, this trajineras, which are nice decorated with colourful flowers, are used as Party-vehicles. =)

    Xochimilco is now a traditional place to make great parties while taking a ride through the lake, and having some drinks, buying food, handicrafts or even asking the Mariachi-trajinera to play a song.

    There can be around 20-30 people in a Trajinera (so it gets cheaper) and you can buy everything (drinks, food, etc) before jumping in, in small grocery shops outside.

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    Xochimilco

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Dec 27, 2007

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    Xochimilco is located at the south part of Mexico City and I think it's a very interesting place for toursts since you can buy flowers, eat Mexican food and ride a trajinera, a colorful boat to take you to its canals for a 1.5 hour ride. Along the way there are vendors in smaller boats selling food, mariachis or drinks. A great world famous spot you can't miss!

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    Xochimilco, or the flowered canoes. (2)

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 6, 2003

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    Frida Kahlo

    There are two main 'embarcaderos' (boat landings) in Xochimilco, as well as a half-dozen secondary ones, and the canal system is extensive enough that traffic jams are rare.

    Today, in fact, it can be quite overwhelming to pole along the canals in one of the colorful punts on a busy weekend, but a sense of excitement accompanies the smaller vessels that carry entertainers (marimba,mariachi...) or vendors (snacks, tamale, elote...) - Frida Kahlo also wrote about the marvelous produce and unusual local dishes she had found on the canals - that join visitors as they drift along the innumerable canals in the shade of towering ahuejote trees... Some vendors even boarding yours uninvited!

    Along the canals were small gardens and homesteads with cackling hens and crowing roosters. Dogs perched precariously or even crawled into small boats along the shore to beg for handouts as the trajineras came by, and an occasional bony horse or cow grazing in a pasture...

    The boat tour is highly entertaining, but for those interested in the history and techniques of chinampa farming, the nearby Parque Ecológico de Xochimilco (Xochimilco Ecological Park) is the place to go.

    There is the Cuemanco boat landing and the largest flower market in Latin America (32 acre)...

    Xochimilco is quite a different experience you just cannot miss.

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    Spend a Sunday at the Floating Gardens

    by namastedc Written Mar 21, 2005

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    Xichimilco

    Xochimilco (pronounced So-Chi-Meel-Co) is one of, if not the most interesting thing you can do in Mexico City. For this reason, it is best that you go when it is in full swing - on a Sunday afternoon.

    To visit the gardens, you rent a boat for the afternoon. While the boats used to come in various sizes, you now have to rent one size regardless of the number of people in your party. For the five in our party, the 20 person boat was excessive in size, but not in cost - I believe it was about 14 dollars.

    The drivers will take you on a slow journey through the canals that make up the gardens. You will pass other boats filled with poeple, bumping into many of them in the traffic jam-ridden areas. Many boats have food on them - just pull up next to them to buy something. Others have bands, and for a dollar or two the band will ride next to you for a song!

    The hardest part about this trip is getting there and away. While most taxi drivers know where the docks are to get on the boat, many do not go there without a passenger - in other words, if you don't arrange for a taxi to come pick you up after your trip is done, don't plan on getting one! There are no reliable taxi stands anywhere near the garden either, so you will not just get lucky, unless you are REALLY lucky, which our 1.5 hours of searching proved we were not.

    This is an incredible experience - do not miss it if you can help it.

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Xochimilco

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Dec 27, 2011

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    Another place you must visit is Xochimilco, a place with water canals where small boats (called TRAJINERAS) sail along, and where you can get Mexican food & music while on the boat (or eat on "shore"), buy handcrafts and flowers, have a beer and just have a good time. Most foreigners ADORE this place. I strongly recommend it, it's fun and very Mexican! And they say it's also great to visit at night, even though you can't see the surrounding vegetation if you go there by night.

    The prices for a ride on the trajineras have gone up quite a bit since my last visit (some 8 years ago, now it's 2011); It used to be about 20 USD per hour on a boat that holds up to 12-15 people, and the rides were usually 2-3 hours long. Nowadays you have to pay PER PERSON (or at least that's how I was charged since it was only 2 of us) and the tour is only 1 hour long, and you have to pay almost twice as much if you want the 2 hour tour. In 2011 the fee we were charged was MXN $200 (about 15 USD) per person per hour. If we had picked the 2 hour tour, we would have paid MXN $350 per person. Of course they offered to lower the price once we were in the middle of the canal so we would stay longer, but we declined.

    I heard that if you went there by night you would have to pay twice as much money, but many people said it was really worth it because it was a lot of fun. I don't know if that's still the case nowadays, but I think the service providers there have become quite greedy with the tourists and the locals as well... it's a real pity because they don't even use the money for the maintenance of the area - it's quite dirty and run down nowadays, so it might lose the UNESCO World Heritage title that it had been granted in the past.

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    Joie de Vivre at the Canals of Xochimilco

    by Daniel_Williams Written Apr 2, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Trajinera in Xochimilco

    I set out to Xochimilco taking the Metro to the end station Tasqueña, and catching the Tren Lijero (an additional 2 pesos) to the end stop, Xochimilco. It was about a 10-minute walk to the Embarcadero, where you pick up the trajineras (boats) that the boatsmen will push you through the canals if desired. I foolishly didn't bargain down from 300 pesos for the ride; however for the magnificence of the experience, it was worth it to me.

    Xochimilco was founded in 900 A.D. and spoke the same language as the Mexica, Nahuatl. Much of the Valle de Mexico during the Classic and Postclassic period was lake. To create fertile ground, the Xochimilca built floating gardens called chinampas using damp-resistant wood from the ahuejote tree, mud, lilies and stone. Builing these chinampas, the Xochimilca created a systems of thousands of canals, that would allow easier access by canoe to these fertile gardens of vegetables, fruit and floriculture. Although the Xochimilca fought battles themselves, they were morphed/allied to the Mexica empire that used their agricultural technology in the Mexica capital of Tenochtitlan.

    Anyhow, riding the trajinera, I just felt such peace and joy. People in smaller canoes would offer goods from jewelry, cloth to elotes (corn) and enchilada. I had lunch as a woman prepared a chicken enchilada in her canoe, which she attached to my trajinera. Other trajinera, with groups of maybe a dozen or 15 Mexicans, would invite a band of 8 mariachis to play/sing for them; I saw some couples dancing on the boats to spirited mariachi music; a marimba (wooden xylophone?) played well and energetically for another group of couples; a cellist sat in boat waiting to be called over. I felt such inner happiness at the beauty and joy surrounding me. My trajinera boatsman Marco made 2 stops, one at a market, the second at a garden; each boat is colourful and has a name overhanging. The whole experience makes me smile in remembrance and I have never experienced anything like it in my 33 years.

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  • very mexican voyage

    by Manyana Updated Nov 15, 2007

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    me with a xochimilcoan company

    i did this on my last day in mexico. i was supposed to spend more 'quality time' somewhere. but i found myself all alone wandering around, not knowing what to do really. then i remembered that a VTer told me that i should go to xochimilco with some friends. what friends? i technically had no one in mexico! and the people i knew started to run out of excuses to not meet me. i said fine. let's go to xochimilco wherever that was.

    i was in zocalo, city centre. so i took the metro to the south end of the city for 45 minutes. then i changed to another train that took me to xochimilco for another 45 minutes. i got off the train, walked a bit, got lost another, and finally found my destination.

    it was the very mexican boat voyage around a little canal with Miriachi to sing your favourite music for you. as i was supposed to be at the airport at 5pm, i had a little spanglish chat with the boatman. he was playing cards with his group, bored until i showed up, so i could their faces lit up. i negotiated the price for a 15-minute lift by the boat around the canal. he told me that he could only offer it for 30 min at least. but i couldn't. he was kind enough and still gave me a nice lift before i took off. it was a nice mexican farewell that would always make me remember the love and pain i experienced in such an amazing vibrant city.

    costs of the boat lift:
    $250: 45 min - 1 hour
    $200: 30 min
    £100: 15 min
    and you still can negotiate a good bargain.

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    The Floating Gardens of Xochimilco

    by malianrob Written Sep 19, 2008

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    I expected this place to be a little bit different but I was in no means disappointed. We came here on a Sunday and had lunch on the trajineras which is what they call the boats that you ride on.
    Basically you get on one of the boats and they row you out down the river and canals. As you ride along the river, mariachis might be on other boats and row along side of you and ask you if you want to hear some music. Others might pass along side of you and ask you if you want them to make you something to eat.
    Some people bring their own food and drinks and make a picnic type of family outting. We saw a few young people who get on the boats and just hang out drinking. Locals come here to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries and other stuff. Some people just just to ride the canals and be romantic.
    There are many boats out on the water and sometimes it can get crowded and the boats might hit eachother so hold on to your beer. They dont go very fast but if you are not expecting a bump it might startle you.
    While we where there, there were many boats not in use but a local told me that there are times when all the Trajineras are being used and you have to wait for a while. We ordered our food there from one of the "mobile" restaurants that approach you and the food was very good. They also make right there practically in front of you. It was quick and affordable.
    So you have to get on and ride one of these trajineras in Xochimilco. They run about 10 dollars USD per person and go from 9am to 6pm.

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    floating Gardens at Xochimilco Nativitas

    by dila Updated Jun 7, 2008

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    From zocalo you take metro 2 to tasquena then you take the tren ligero to last stop from here you can take a kind of collectivo. i was lucky i could walk with someone to it. it is called something navidatas. dont take a boat at the beginning just follow the water to the end i did get a whole boat for myself for 140 pesos for an hour it is 160 for a bigger boat.

    also if you want to use a toilet sanitorios the one near the boat at the end is less crowded 3 pesos.
    dont expect floating gardens because they even have houses on them. just enjoy a nice boattrip.it will stop at a place were they sell plants but that were the only flowers i saw. flower season more in april i think and later
    from zocalo mexico df takes at least an hour to get at navidas

    renting a boat
    Embarcadero (nativitas) Trajineras
    small toldo azul (blue) 140 pesos an hour
    grand toldo verde (green) 160 pesos an hour

    bought a 2 persons blanket for 200 pesos (with sunstone on it) at teotihuacan they tried to ask 450.
    did buy a cup of fruit for 20 pesos forgot about water warning but didnot get ill. was also near boat rental at end

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  • gypsysoul73's Profile Photo

    Take a canal cruise in Xochimilco

    by gypsysoul73 Written Jan 16, 2007

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    Xochimilco trajineras
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    Xochimilco is touted as the Mexican Venice. Its 180 km. tree-lined canals are plied by brightly colored and flower-decked trajineras, the local equivalent of the gondola and the amphibious cousin of the Philippine jeepney, complete with female names and the occasional religious praises distinguishing one from the other. We boarded one which had a long yellow picnic table and yellow chairs. There were 12 of us but it could have accommodated a few more. We were provided with a big tub of ice packed with beer and assorted sodas and juice for the journey.

    As the boatman expertly guided us out from the crowded dock and into the waterway, I sat back and let the experience delight my senses. We glided gracefully past private houses along the banks which reminded me of those homes along the canals near Camden Lock. We were approached by vendors on their own punts selling everything from jewelry to candied apples, corn, toys, ponchos, and of course flowers. Xochimilco does mean “place where flowers grow” in the Nahuatl language. We cruised past other trajineras carrying picnicking families, tour groups, couples on dates, and marimba musicians.

    And then there were the mariachis! We were serenaded by 2 different groups. They attach their boat to yours and then entertain you for $6 per song. The first group did just that, and played for us from their boat.

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    Xochimilco

    by AcornMan Written Dec 3, 2005

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    I've heard Xochimilco compared to Venice, and although that's quite a stretch, Xochimilco is a very interesting place. It is a series of canals in the southern part of the city where you can hire long colorful boats to take you out for as long as you want. It is a very popular destination for Mexico City families, especially on Sundays when you'll see huge groups of people relaxing and eating as their boats drift along the canals. People on smaller boats sell fresh-made food of all sorts, and other boats have mariachi bands that will serenade you for a fee. It's a great place to just relax and maybe have lunch.

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    The Venice of Mexico

    by lareina Updated Dec 21, 2004

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    A party on the canal

    We made the long trek out to Xochimilco to ride a boat through the last remaining canals in Mexico City. When we boarded our very own trajinera named 'Beatriz', we knew that this experience was worth the extra effort. We took an hour-long ride on the canals for 140 pesos and left from the embarcadero Nativitas. This embarcadero is a further walk from the others, but the prices are posted and are cheaper than the prices the guys closer to town were quoting us. We bought beer and some food to take with us on our ride.

    We passed people in boats selling everything from tamales to mariachi songs. Also, there were various plant nurseries along the banks open for business. There were other tourists on boats and entire families having grand parties with the mariachi boats that they had hired. Our oarsman, Sergio, told us that it gets busy on the canals on the weekends.

    I had no idea that the canals existed in Mexico City and recommend this experience to any visitor.

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  • chris_i79's Profile Photo

    Xochimilco - The Venice of Mexico City

    by chris_i79 Updated May 10, 2004

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    pick a boat any boat

    Xochimilco is a great place in Mexico City, originally created by the Aztecs to be agricultural canals. Now the canals are home to the embarcaderos, floating boats that are rented in mostly by families in the day and parties in the night. The boats come complete with a pole carrying gondola driver. People generally bring there own drinks and refreshments. However once on the canals Gondolas will approach your and try to sell you food, drinks and candles. There are even Marachi gondolas who will glide beside your boat and provide live music at the right price.

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  • Colorful Canals

    by Jetgirly Written Feb 26, 2012

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    A long, long time ago, Mexico City (or Tenochtitlan, as it was called) was built on an island in the middle of a series of five interconnected lakes. Over time the water evaporated or was used, until almost nothing remained of the lakes. For those wanting to imagine the area during Aztec times, Xochimilco is home to most of the canals that remain today. There are lots of organized tours to the area, which can be nice because the colorful boats you'll ride out are intended (and priced) for fourteen passengers. Alternately you can go alone and partner with other tourists at the dock, or simply pay for the entire boat for yourself or your small group. The cost is about $15 USD per hour and most tours take several hours.

    After hiring your boat, your oarsman will paddle you along the busy canals which are often called floating gardens or floating markets. You will pass other day-trippers out for a scenic tour, vendors selling souvenirs and food items from "floating shops" (well, canoes...) and even mariachi bands prepared to serenade your boat for a small price. Sunday is the busiest day to come, so your boat will be fighting for space but you'll see even more entertainment and have even more vendors available. Boat rides are also available to the ecological park, although there isn't necessarily much to see there and the ride isn't bright and colorful like the main market/garden routes. One can also ask their boatman to visit the Island of the Dolls (La Isla de las Munecas), where a solitary man strung thousands of decaying dolls in the trees to appease the angry spirit of a dead young girl, back in the 1950s. It is a two-hour journey to see the dolls.

    The town of Xochimilco has a huge, busy market and lots of restaurants if you'd like to grab a meal on dry land!

    To get to Xochimilco take the metro all the way south to the Tasquena station, then transfer to light rail and continue south to the Embarcardero station in Xochimilco (this was closed when I visited but I believe that it has reopened). From the station just follow the crowds about four blocks to the dock where boats depart.

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    Mariachi

    by anagrettel Written Aug 13, 2008

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    Mariachi at xochimilco
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    A great place to hear Mariachi is During a trip in Trajinera at Xochimilco Lake. It's fun and if with the right person even romantic. The cost is around $60 pesos per song, so if you plan on paying a Mariachi take with you the name of your favorite Mariachi songs.

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