Guanajuato Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Guanajuato

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    The Pantheon / Museo de las Momias Mexico

    by vaticanus Updated Sep 10, 2007

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    GM5921

    The Pantheon overlooks the city of Guanajuato. Here, bodies of the dead were placed inside crypts above ground. Heat dried the bodies creating mummies of exceptional quality. The first mummy, a French physician, was discovered after removal for failure to pay a burial tax in 1865. Beginning in the late 1800s some were transferred to galleries that are open to the public. The Pantheon contains the largest collection of mummies in the Western Hemisphere.

    Examinations of the mummies reveal many cases of arthritis caused by hard labor, tuberculosis, and the results of high infant mortality.

    Outside, there are a number of vendors and stalls that sell souvenirs of the Pantheon such as keychains, wallets, toys etc.

    The view of Guanajuato from the grounds of the Pantheon is tremendous- high up but not too far away. Although the route to walk up is confusing (NOTE: it is better to take a cab or bus up here); the walk down is a sightseer's paradise of tiny steep streets, stairways and brightly painted houses.

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    Gardens de la Exhacienda San Gabriel de Barrera

    by Sladja_79 Updated May 9, 2007

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    This site is a MUST SEE...if you happen to only have a few days in Guanajuato, or even just a few hours, this is a place you have to experience. Serenity, peace and quiet, aromas, greenery, colours...endless stunning views once the entry gate is crossed.

    An "oasis of peace and rest, where 'one's' body is refreshed and soul takes pleasure"...

    This oasis was originally used in the extraction of ore and in the modern age has been converted into a number of colorful gardens, cortyards, museum residences, and a restaurant/caffe. Originally owned by the Barrera family, the entire area extends over 22,000 square meters (237,000 square ft.). Today, it is owned and maintained by the City of Guanajuato.

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    Treat Yourself to a Walking Tour

    by spitball Updated Mar 2, 2007

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    Guanajuato Mexico by Sam Logan

    A very large amount of Guanajuato is pedestrian, no vehicle traffic allowed, so this is a perfect spot to get some excersise in on your holidays. The streets are quite narrow, so no cars would fit. This city is not too large (pop. 100,000) also, located at alt: 2017 metres. It was in the past historically one of Mexico's richest. After silver was found in Zacatecas, Spanish prospectors combed the rugged lands north of Mexico City and were rewarded by discoveries of silver, gold, iron, lead, zinc and tin. For two centuries 30% to 40% of the world's silver was mined in Guanajuato. In my humble opinion, Guanajuato is the perfect quiet honeymoon spot, very, very romantic.
    You can hire a taxi tour up into the hills surrounding the city, this I have not done, but perhaps next time I get down there. You know what it's like, all the best laid plans of mice and men....don't always pan out. This beautiful painting was done by a local Vancouver artist by the name of Sam Logan, who has himself travelled extensively. Check out his website.

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    Museo de las Momias

    by rafgys Written Jan 27, 2007

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    It may sound creepy, and perhaps a little grotesque... but it's a different kind of museum. It's pretty cool. They have around 100 mummified bodies and a few heads. If you get the tour, you'll get to understand the whole mummifying process and stuff. It’s quite interesting.

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    Dusty Old Dead Folks in the Mummy Museum

    by spitball Updated Apr 14, 2006

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    Guanajuato Gate
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    In Guanajuato there is a mummy museum, its as freakish as it sounds. Turns out that in my understanding, families must continue to pay to have their relatives interned in the graveyard, and when they can't or won't keep paying, the authorities must make room for more bodies so they began removing some. Because of the conditions with the climate and soil, it was discovered, that the corpses where perfectly mummified.
    There are well over 100 corpses in there for your viewing pleasure, but a note here: have breakfast before you go, because you probably won't feel like eating anything afterwards. Not even the candy corpses the sellers try and hit you up with as you exit the place.

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    The Alhondiga

    by jungles Written Apr 7, 2006

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    The Alhondiga battle personified
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    The Alhondiga was the city grainery of Guanajuato, and it was the scene of a very important battle in the early days of the Mexican revolution. In September 1810 Padre Hidalgo and his army of 80,000 peasant supporters attacked the city of Guanajuato. The Spanish retreated into the Alhondiga. Hidalgo's untrained men, many of them armed only with mining tools, began hurling rocks at the Alhondiga. Many indentations caused by these rocks are clearly visible on the outside of the building today. With the Spanish pouring boiling water from the windows down onto the revolutionaries, the situation for Hidalgo's men looked hopeless.

    If local folklore is to be believed (the authenticity of this story is debated), the turning point came when a young miner nicknamed El Pipila (The Turkeycock) tied a slab of stone to his back to protect himself, grabbed a burning torch, stumbled to the wooden gates and set them alight. El Pipila was killed in the process, but his actions enabled Hidalgo's men to storm the building, massacre the Spaniards and capture the city.

    Six months later Hidalgo was captured and killed, and his head was hung in a cage from a corner of the building for all to see, a reminder to the people of the dangers of disobedience. From the other three corners hung the heads of three more revolutionaries - Ignacio Allende, Juan Alolama and Mario Jimenez. They would remain there for ten more years until independence was achieved.

    The Alhondiga is now open to the public as a museum and has lots of interesting exhibits related to the revolution inside. I don't have any photos of the building, so these two murals are artistic representations of the Alhondiga battle and of Hidalgo's head displayed in the cage. These murals are in the independence museum in the town of Dolores Hidalgo (see my Dolores Hidalgo page for more info). The statue of El Pipila is on top of a hill with a great view of the city. For two pesos you can even climb inside the statue all the way up to El Pipila's shoulder.

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    Mummy museum

    by jungles Written Apr 7, 2006

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    World's smallest mummy
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    This is a very popular destination for visitors to Guanajuato, but be warned it can be very disturbing for some people. Many dead bodies in varying states of preservation are on display, including those of children and babies. There is one mummy of a woman who, judging by the position of her body, was apparently buried alive, then later woke up in her coffin and tried unsuccessfully to force her way out.

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    Boca Mina de San Cayetano

    by jungles Written Apr 7, 2006

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    The Boca Mina de San Cayetano is one of 23 interconnecting mines in Guanajuato and is named after the patron saint of miners. It is still operational, but it's also open for tours in which miners lead tourists 60 metres down inside the mine.

    The mine was opened in 1550, just 31 years after Cortes first landed in what is now Mexico. In colonial times it was worked by Indians who received no pay other than food and lodging. They descended 750 metres, then climed back up with 75 kgs of minerals on their backs, then back down and up again twelve times a day, retreiving 900 kgs each per day. Most of the miners died from being overworked within ten years, and many of them went blind due to working by candlelight in pitch black darkness.

    The miners who work there today have better conditions - they use elevators rather than steps - but the wages are still incredibly low. Our guide Ramiro told us he is paid 37 pesos (US$ 3.33) for eight hours of work.

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    Callejon del beso

    by jungles Written Apr 7, 2006

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    Kissing Lane

    Callejon del beso means the alleyway of the kiss. It is so called because the lane is so narrow, and thus the buildings on each side so close together, that it's possible for two neighbours to lean out of their windows and kiss from across the street. Of course this has spawned many legends of star-crossed lovers, which you will undoubtedly hear if you join a callejoneada (see my callejoneada tip).

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    Callejoneada

    by jungles Written Apr 7, 2006

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    A minstrel group performing in Guanajuato

    Callejon is the Spanish word for a small street or alleyway, and a callejoneada is a musical tour led by a local minstrel group through the many small alleyways of Guanajuato. The tour starts in the main plaza, where a group of University students dressed in renaissance-era costumes will play a few songs to get people interested while they try to sell tickets. With the purchase of a ticket you get a small jug which you are allowed to refill with wine throughout the tour. Once a large enough group has formed, the musicians will lead the crowd through the callejones, singing songs and telling stories and legends about different points of interest, often including rather dirty jokes. All of this is in Spanish only, but the atmosphere can make it worthwhile even if you don't understand anything.

    While our guidebook encouraged bringing your own bottle of wine instead of buying a ticket, this is not really possible, at least not to follow the whole tour. There is one point where the alley is very narrow, and they will stop you there and not let you pass through if you don't have a ticket.

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    Guanajuato Streets

    by jumanuel Updated Mar 15, 2006

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    Streets

    Some of the streets to take you to the downtown are like caves, becuse Guanajuato was a place with many mills, gold and silver were the attractivness of the town. So during years mills were the economic activity for the country.

    You will be delighted to see a mill, there are some tours in there, if you like it I can recommend another Mill in the sate of Hidalgo, is near Mexico city.

    Nowadays this streets are aswesom in the sence you can realize of the hard work duirng all those years and how large they are, REALLY TAKE A LOOK !

    The streets own a colonial style, you can feel you can be in the renace time.

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    Templo de San Diego and more

    by gypsyT. Written Feb 16, 2006

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    Located a few steps away from the Teatro Juarez and facing the Union Garden, you find this marvellous construction built on 1784. The Barroque style front is beautifully ornated with varied forms sculptured on pink stone where you can observe on the sides the images of St. Francisco and St. Domingo. Centrally, and above the door, you find the window of the chorus which has - placed before it - St. Diego sculpture.

    Los Momias de Guanajuato:
    In the museum of the mummies, 119 mummies of men, women, and children are shown, among whom there is the smallest mummy in the world. It is said that a pregnant woman wiht 5 or 6 months who dies with her son during Caesarean, were buried together and they were exhibited that way, but in 1972 are separated and now the small body is known ast the smallest mummy of the world.

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  • Diego Rivera House

    by jonbarb709 Updated Jan 30, 2006

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    This is Museum of Diego Rivera, the house were he was born. Paintings from 1920-1956. The house was restored and converted to this museum There is also some work by Frida Kahlo's work. This is a small entrance fee. There are two floors to this museum and there are some excellent paintings of his early work.

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  • Best Museum in town

    by jonbarb709 Written Jan 30, 2006

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    There are several museums in town, but the Museo Iconografico del Quijote, (Don Quixote) was fantastic. Don Quioxite is a favorite subject of a large number of artists and they are all here. This is a fantastic collection of art based on Don Quixote. The museum is spotless, the cleanest one we have ever been in. The bathroom is excellent. The price to go in - free. A must stop. There are paintings, murals, and sculptures. Unbelievable array of Don Quixote.

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  • La Valenciana Church (San Cayetano)

    by jonbarb709 Written Jan 30, 2006

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    Built (1765-17880) by the owner of the nearby mine. The interior is unbelievable, acoustics are fantastic, and there are numerous carvings.
    This area has several things are worth the trip up. Across the street from the church is a great restaurant La Casa del Conde de la Valenciana, there is also a couple of crafts shops in the area and there is a mine. One of the craft shops Ojo de Venado in the area also took Visa cards
    This church and area is high above Guanajuato, there is a bus that goes to the area, and it is also the road the ceremist Capelo.

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Guanajuato Things to Do

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