Unique Places in Oaxaca de Juárez

  • Tree of Tule
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  • Tree of Tule
    by fachd
  • Tree of Tule
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Oaxaca de Juárez

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    nearby villages and market days

    by susiemargare Updated Jun 10, 2014

    each of the small villages around oaxaca city has a market day. i went on a friday to santo tomas alieza, where i bought several woven things (purse, napkins). this market area is very small.

    i also went to a larger market, which was more of a market for the locals. it included chickens and goats for sale outside the building, fresh meat inside the building, and many, many stalls of clothing (which was mainly cheap american stuff, much to my disappointment).

    my understanding is that ocatlan also has a friday market day and that ixtlan de juarez has a monday market day. i wish i had also gone to teotitlan del valle, the market day of which i do not know; the village is renowned for its weavings.

    evidently you can ride a colectivo (sort of a van, smaller than a bus, burgundy and cream) to the different villages all on one day (i think). to my understanding, it departs from the side street of the abastos market; i do not know times.

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    Fabrica De Mezcal Artesana

    by fachd Written Dec 4, 2013

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    We visited small Mezcal factory (Fabrica De Mezcal Artesanal) not far from Oaxaca city. Mezcal is older brother to Tequila and is made from 100% agave plant. It was interesting visit. They explain to the visitors how the drink was made and process.

    For the best part, the visitor’s can sips the different sample before you buy. The mezcal all come in different flavors. We end up buying few bottles of Mezcal one of my favorites is cappuccino flavor with 19% alcohol, about $10AUD per bottle.

    Small Mezcal factory outside Oaxaca City Agave plant Best part taste before you buy! Oooh I think I had enough of tasting!
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    Jacobo and Maria Angeles

    by fachd Written Dec 4, 2013

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    Outside Oaxca in San Martin Tilcajete are Jacobo and Maria Angeles family home and workshop. Jacobo is talented wood carver. Him and his wife Maria are recognized for their distinctive painting style. This is a must visit just to see their work of art.

    Jacobo and Maria Angeles family home & workshop Finish products Busy at work Wood carver at work Explaining the natural colour
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    Doña Rosa workshop

    by fachd Written Dec 4, 2013

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    Not far from Oaxaca is the ceramic artist Doña Rosa home whom she is famous invented unique technique from the local clay to shiny black after firing. Her technique created a new market for folk art collectors and tourist. It is so popular Nelson Rockefeller promoted it in United States. San Bartolo Coyotepec South of Oaxaca.

    Dona Rosa
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  • En Via

    by sammiewattson Updated Jan 21, 2011

    While in Oaxaca recently, a friend and I went on a tour with En Via, a micro-lending organization that runs ½ day tours out to Teotitlan, a town famous for its rugs. We had the most amazing day and it definitely completed our trip…we went into the houses of six different women, whom are all receiving interest free loans from En Via. We spent the day talking to these wonderful women about everything from micro-financing to tortilla making to the natural dying process of wool. It was an incredible way to see micro-lending in action; and it was amazing to be witness to the substantial emotional and financial impact it is having on these women’s lives. Don´t miss it!

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  • Meet Zapotec women in their homes, and help

    by 2658nja Written Oct 27, 2010

    I have just gone on the En Via tour, and have to share the experience with people who want to do something really special and worthwhile during their stay in Oaxaca. En Via offers a socially responsible tour. This micro finance organization gives interest-free loans to indigenous women in Teotitlan del Valle to start or expand their business. You get to meet these women in their homes or at their businesses, and talk to them (with the help of the volunteer guides/translators) to learn what they do, and how they want to improve their lives and the lives of their families. In addition to having a wonderful, inspirational day, you get the satisfaction of knowing you have done something to really help them, because 100% of the tour money goes to the loans for these women. I highly recommend this special experience.

    one of the women we helped with a microloan trying our hand at spinning wool
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  • En Via = Taking a Tour and Fighting Poverty

    by espinalc Written Aug 15, 2010

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    Every country has two stories. We always get to see the more polished side – where people seem to be doing really well, where everyone is partying downtown, or where everything seems just like home (for me in the USA).

    However, there is always another story to every country (even at home) – where people are just getting by, living check to check, working all day to support their family, and quite possibly skipping several or many meals a week. It’s not the more “real” part of any country, but one that exhibits just another reality.

    I have been in Oaxaca, Mexico for a total of three months living near the Zocalo, essentially living in the same sort of comfort as home. Not once did I get to explore something completely different from my daily life. En Via gave me a glimpse into the current life of a people and culture of a particular community, that has been around far before the Spanish arrived to present day Mexico. That community is Teotitlan del Valle.

    En Via, a microfinance organization that gives interest-free loans to women in the aforementioned community, raises money by providing tours of a very different nature. Instead of touring a ruin or simply walking around a community, the borrowers of En Via invite tourists to either their residence or place of business to discuss what they will do with their loans that amount anywhere between US$100.00 and US$300.00.

    The day-long tour consisted of six presentations, each lasting about an hour and occurring at a different borrower’s home or vending stand in Teotitlan. I was very excited to go into their homes to see their current living conditions, and at each visit, I only wanted to wish them even more luck with their business. I absolutely enjoyed the visit and seeing their workspace. More importantly, I enjoyed listening to their answers to our questions, everything they had to say about their business, and all of their stories about their lives.

    For most of my stay in Mexico I have been exposed to families where men made all of the decisions and did all of the talking. However, with En Vía, I finally saw empowered women addressing a very important aspect of their family’s life. En Via gives them a wonderful opportunity to play an even greater role in their family by making important decisions that will hopefully improve their living situation.

    This is not to say that I was 100% sure that the women made all of the decisions around their En Via loan, for there were occasional instances when the men of the household tried to do more of the talking. I was disappointed on those occasions but the En Via staff, who translated the presentations in English and our questions in Spanish, definitely made an effort to get the spotlight back on the women. Regardless, it must be a difficult matter to control.

    Lastly, the tour concluded several hours later with lunch at a restaurant owned by former En Via borrowers, but beforehand, I had water and a small snack while the tours were happening – which turned out to be a smart move.

    To conclude: the presentations were great, you know your tour fee is going to an excellent cause, and you get to meet women and their families who have the same amount of ambition and work ethic as you do, but just no credit to accommodate their skills. I definitely suggest you take this tour when you visit Oaxaca, Mexico.

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  • Have fun & Support Women Entrepreneurs!

    by starrboogie Written May 20, 2010

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    As En Via's website (http://www.envia.org/)states, "we provide tours to the pueblos where we work, where participants get to see first-hand how microfinance works, experience a very special glimpse into life in Oaxaca, and put their money to work in a way that has a real impact on the community. We use 100% of our tour fees to provide interest-free loans, and once the loan is paid back, to support the rest of our work in the community." What you have to see for yourself is the spirit of these women entrepreneurs as they struggle to support their families and enhance their communities. Through their eyes, you will gain a clear understanding of the problems they face and the solutions they are developing. You will have the opportunity to interact with them, support their efforts, and get to know Teotitlan (the small village where En Via works) from the inside out. The tour itself is small, well organized, and lots of fun. Don't miss this opportunity. Your participation includes the opportunity to select the group you feel most deserves the loan at this time. Be prepared for a new-founded connection to both the people and the place.

    En Via Micro Loan Recipient - an awesome weaver
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  • Great way to connect with local women + give back!

    by earthtravels52 Written May 6, 2010

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    This is a non-profit that is working to fight poverty in Oaxaca, and they run amazing tours out to Teotitlan del Valle - it was one of the very best things I did in my whole three months in Mexico.

    It's a mix of responsible tourism plus microfinance, plus a chance to see a culture and life in Oaxaca so much more personally, plus a chance to give back.

    We went to meet six women who were applying for microloans - two were weavers who have been making these beautiful rugs since they were children, one was making pinatas and selling them out of her front door of her house while her daughter was selling fruit and flowers there, and one showed us how she makes tortillas over the fire and explained how she knows people she could sell more to, but just needs more money to be able to buy the raw materials to make more.

    It was so special to be able to connect with these women and hear about their plans to help their families. At the end of the day, En Via gives 100% of the tour fees as interest-free loans to one of the two groups of women we saw, so it was also wonderful to know that we were contributing directly to helping these women make their plans happen.

    You can find out more on their website - www.envia.org

    I can't recommend this highly enough to anyone going to Oaxaca!

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  • Fundación En Vía

    by callieyow Written Apr 29, 2010

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    I have recently spent time in Oaxaca, Mexico and while I had a lot of very cool experiences, the most worthwhile thing was the tour that I went on with Fundación En Vía (www.envia.org). It is a non-profit micro finance organization working to fight poverty in Oaxaca that takes travelers on tours of Teotitlán del Valle to see the local businesses that have been put into place by groups of women. This is a perfect way to both see another side of Oaxaca while giving back to the wonderful people that live in it. The trip was amazing and I would recommend it to anyone.

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    Teotitlan del Valle

    by dila Written Jul 30, 2008

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    After Tule tree we went to Teotitlan de Valle. Here you can see how they make carpets. It is very intresting. You can see how they did it before the Spanish came and brought the wheel.
    Also how the color the wool and how they make the carpets. Ofcourse you can buy them too.
    I did see a few nice ones but i think the prices are higher here.
    Carpet for under my salontable would be 3500 and later 3000 pesos.
    They colour the wool yellow with rockmoss and Mary gold flower
    Blue = Indio plant
    Red / pink a kind of insect on a cactus it looks like white powder. with a brush you get it off.
    If you have the red you use lime and it turns orange
    bakin salt it turns purple.
    at 12. 20 we leave to Mitla spend 45 minutes here

    liked the blue one 3500/3000 pesos
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    Grasshoppers... do you dare?

    by leigh767 Written Jan 14, 2008

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    grasshoppers, or "chapulines", are commonly sold along this she's just south of the so-called will. These creatures range from small to large and are fried chili. If you're feeling adventurous definitely did them a try. My conclusion is that the smaller ones are tastier ( perhaps because there is more chili and less grasshopper). when eating the larger ones, you might want to remove the legs first.

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    Local markets

    by Marie-France Written Feb 7, 2006

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    Almost each day of the week is market day in one of the towns in the valleys around Oaxaca.

    On Friday I took a tour to Ocotlan Market and on Saturday to Tlacolula. I liked the first one better, probably because of the layout, which was very "maze like" and the local colour and music.

    Many hotels and travel agencies arrange tours that combine a market and some other sites into a day or half-day tour. It's more expensive than just taking a local bus, but a lot simpler and more efficient, and you get an english speaking tour guide as part of the package. You may also get a demonstration of pottery, carpet weaving, etc, in one of the handicraft villages.

    I paid 180 pesos ($17) for a 4-5 hour tour including 3 or 4 stops.

    Ocotlan Market

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    A Market for the Locals- Tlacolula

    by TravelSimone Updated Aug 8, 2005

    The Tlacolula Market is held on Sundays. It is approximately 30 KM (~20 miles) south east of Oaxaca.

    This market is great to see real local culture. This is an agriculture market where a few arts and crafts are sold. However, don't go here expecting to find a huge selection of high quality arts and crafts. I think that stuff is thrown in for the occasional tourist who finds their way to the market.

    The market is held in Tlacolula on its streets leading to the Zocolo and in the Zocolo. Just keep your eyes open for the church (which is worth the quick visit.)

    You can get here by local second class bus, which station is located on Trujano in Oaxaca, 8 blocks west of the Zocolo.

    Tlaclula Market
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    Cool off in a water park

    by jmbredeck Updated Mar 24, 2005

    Check out Balneario las Brisas (or one of the others - there are lots!) if you are looking for something fun to do with kids. In Semana Santa it isn´t unusual for afternoon temps to hit the low 90s, and cooling off in a water park may be the best way to satisfy restless kids who are less than impressed by the marvels at the Rufino Tamayo museum.
    You´ll have to figure out transport (we took a taxi del sitio, destination Etla, costing 30 pesos to go, public bus, 6 pesos to return) but once you´re there they have food, towels, balls, music, changing rooms and plenty of pools to cool off in.
    Price to get in was 45 pesos (adults) and 40 pesos (kids)
    Location: San Sebastián Etla, 9 km. al norte de la capital de Oaxaca - on way out of town to MX City

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