Cobá Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn
  • Things to Do
    by blueskyjohn

Most Recent Things to Do in Cobá

  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    Climbing Coba

    by wilocrek Written Jan 1, 2008

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    When visiting Coba plan on doing a little climbing! Not only does Coba boast the highest pyramid in the area you are also allowed to climb it! Climbing Coba will give you a greater appreciation for the workmanship of the Mayans as well as give an authentic feel of climbing the same steps that Mayan kings once climbed. The view from the top is a panoramic feast for your eyes, its something you won't soon forget!

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    To Walk it or Bike it? That is the question!

    by wilocrek Written Jan 1, 2008

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    Coba is one of the largest Mayan sites and is spread out over a great distance. Walking Coba can be an all day event as the distance between the structures can stretch into a 20 minute walk. That said its a wonderful walk through the park as you are literally in the middle of the jungle. Many people though choose to rent a bike, which cost about $8 U.S. for the day and can be rented at the entrance of the site. Biking through the park is a lot of fun and definitely a unique experience. If your planning on spending a whole day at the park I would recommend renting a bike which will enable you to see the whole site without having to break a sweat. Now if you truly are of the lazy sort you can also arrange to be carted around by a porter. This is expensive but it looked like it was fun!

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    Visiting the Structures

    by wilocrek Written Jan 1, 2008

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    The different structure within Coba are basic yet breathtaking. They don't have the magnificence of Chichen Itza or Palenque but they are deceptively big. Because they are hidden in the jungle you don't actually see the structure until you literally walk into them. Its part of the charm of visiting Coba, the structures pop out at you without warning and thats where the breathtaking awe comes into play. The people of Coba certainly didn't have the artistic flair that their Mayan counterparts in Chichen Itza had but they must of had a lot of manpower, or mayan power, because the main pyramid is far larger than Chichen Itza's El Castillo. Plan on more than just an afternoon to appreciate Coba!

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    Crocodiles!!

    by rafgys Written May 29, 2007

    After checking the ruins out, before you head back to town… make a quick stop by the lake. You’ll see a small dock from where you can see some crocodiles being fed…

    There will also be a guy charging you a dollar to go into the dock. Unless you’re from Australia or some where in Africa, it’s always interesting to see some crocodiles in the wilderness (at least, it was for me!).

    Related to:
    • Zoo

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    Check the 'cenotes' out!!

    by rafgys Written May 19, 2007

    About 7 KM from the archeological area... there are two well-known 'cenotes'. The one I visited was called Tamcach - Ha, awesome!! Blue clear water inside a huge cave... and if that's not enough, when you are walking down the stairs, you can jump to the water from two different points... one is 6 meters high, and the other one is 10 !!!

    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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    Archeological area

    by rafgys Written May 19, 2007

    The area is divided by three different sub-areas... in the front part you'll see a pyramid and some smaller buildings. Then you can get deeper into the jungle, about 1 KM... you're gonna get to some small buildings (Conjunto Pinturas). If you keep walking the same way, you'll get to some sort of sculptures (Grupo Macanxoc). But if you turn to the left (you'll see the sign)... you'll get to where the big pyramids are.

    Besides some smaller buildings, there are two big pyramids. You can climb to the biggest one... a very tough duty, but what you see from up there is worth all you have in mind! You're gonna be 20 or 25 meters above the top of the trees, with the whole jungle at your feet.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    The Lake

    by leffe3 Written Mar 27, 2006

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    A wonderful location, with the expansive lake and shorelines ringed by forest with the exception of the stretch between the ruins and the town (running as far as the Villa Arquelogica hotel). It calls for time to hang out at the shore and do little (sadly, the presence of crocs prevents swimmig in the lake) - watching local fishermen, wading birds, the occasional turtle.

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    The ruins

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 27, 2006

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    With the tallest pyramid of the Mayan ruins in Yucatan and probably the biggest city, the fact that Coba remains virtually unexcavated makes this a quite extraordinary destination. Jungle paths link the structures that have been, to date, excavated. In between, foliage covered mounds indicate there's still a lot more to come! And wander off the main linking paths and you feel like an intrepid explorer who's discovering the site for the first time.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Ball court

    by Dabs Written Dec 26, 2004

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    Ball court

    There are 2 ball courts that have been excavated at Coba, this is the one that is closest to the entrance. The ball court has two stone walls with a field in between, the two walls have hoops through which it is believed that the Mayans used their hips and elbows to get a ball through the hoop.

    It is believed that human sacrifice was the eventual outcome of the game but theories differ on whether it was the winners, an honor to be sacrificed, or the losers, paying with their lives.

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    Nohoch Mul

    by Dabs Updated Dec 26, 2004

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    Nohoch Mul

    Nohoch Mul is the main pyramid at Coba, at 126 feet the tallest pyramid on the Yucatan Peninsula. You can climb the 120 steps to the top to have a look over the vast surrounding area.

    From the top you can see the two lakes on the outskirts of the site and the observatory that you pass on the way to the pyramid.

    Although it's harder physically to climb up, going down seems much more dangerous for slipping and falling. Wear good shoes or sandals, there is a rope going down the center you can hang onto

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    swimming in Cho Ha Cenote

    by twoinluv Written Sep 17, 2004

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    swimming in Cho Ha Cenote

    OK, so we were crazy and forgot our swim suits. So we got down to our underwear and swam in the Cho Ha cenote. The water was only slightly cool, which was refreshing since the cenote itself is more of a cave and has a rather warm air temperature.

    This cenote is only 5 - 8 minutes past Coba. Keep driving past the ruins of Coba, through a tiny village, and on your left about 8 minutes or so down the road will be the Cho Ha cenote. It was only recently discovered, and the families in the village pooled their money together to make this cenote open for public use. So support it and tip the local Mayan guides!

    If you are going to make the drive to Coba, don't skip this cenote. The water isn't very deep, it is safe, and how many people have swam in an underground cave in the jungle? It is a cool thing to experience and say you have done.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Water Sports
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    Cho Ha Cenote

    by twoinluv Written Sep 17, 2004

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    Cho Ha Cenote

    The spelling is probably wrong, but the Cho Ha cenote was as much fun, if not more, than the actual ruins of Coba. This cenote is on the same road leading to Coba, only keep driving past the ruins, through a tiny village, and this cenote will be on your left hand side, maybe 5 - 8" past Coba. You can't miss it.

    They locals recently discovered this cenote, and only made it into a public cenote with the last year (2003). You enter through stairs a tiny hold in the ground and end up in a big cave.

    The water in the cenote is crystal clear and only slightly cold. It isn't very deep, but it is kind of scary and exciting to be swimming in an underground cave.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Water Sports

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  • twoinluv's Profile Photo

    Tiro Leza Cenote

    by twoinluv Written Sep 17, 2004
    Tero Leza Cenote

    Although the spelling is probably wrong, this cenote was fun. You can get to the bottom by stairs or rappeling. The locals have rope and such set up for rappeling into the cenote. I think we paid $3 for the both of us to rappel.

    This cenote is on the same road taken to get to Coba, only you continue driving past Coba through a tiny village. You will see the cenote on your right, about 5" past Coba.

    Although this is not a cenote you can swim in, it is worth a look. There are animals that have made their homes in the bottom of the cenote, including two tiny deer. We enjoyed feeding the deer and a spider monkey.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel
    • Archeology

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  • twoinluv's Profile Photo

    the large temple of Coba

    by twoinluv Written Sep 17, 2004

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    the big temple in Coba

    This is the large temple in Coba. It is quite a walk from the main entrance, perhaps a mile or 2 over a bumpy path. It is worth seeing, but I recommend renting either a bike (around $4 - 7) per person or even better, a local will drive you and another person around on a large tricycle like contraption. It has a padded seat, which I wish we had done. Even on bike, our rears were sore from the bumpy roads. The local will drive you for around $7 - 10 for the day; and don't forget to tip.

    Since the temple is so far away, there is a little stand located near it with water, drinks, and snacks. The temple is quite a climb, so wear tennis shoes. Women in little flip flops trying to climb the temple were really struggling, and since you are hours from the nearest hospital don't take a chance on falling.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • micas_pt's Profile Photo

    Pelota game

    by micas_pt Written Nov 9, 2003

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    There used to a game played by Mayan people called Pelota. This game was played in a proper field that is still visible in several Mayan ruins. Cobá has a small (compared to the one in Chichén Itzá) pelota "courtyard". This place consists of a kind of corridor between walls with some Gods designed on walls and a kind of hole, ... louzy description, please see the photo!

    Actually there are some versions as to the rules of this game, each believing to be correct one. The version i was told it's about men playing this pelota game with a stone ball weighting about 4 kg. Apparently they played the game with the ball on their hips, which seems strange to me since ball is hard and heavy, but that's what i was told.

    One of the game versions says the winner (a man not a team) died at the end of the game. This was his prize: a sacrifice for the Gods, ...which was a great honour back then.

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