Izamal Things to Do

  • Buggy no 23 with his strong little horse
    Buggy no 23 with his strong little horse
    by ciaobella55
  • Central Plaza in Izamal
    Central Plaza in Izamal
    by karenincalifornia
  • Convent at Izamal, MX
    Convent at Izamal, MX
    by karenincalifornia

Most Recent Things to Do in Izamal

  • ines2003's Profile Photo

    visit the near twon hoctum

    by ines2003 Written Oct 21, 2010
    4 more images

    visit the church, the main square, the municipality, the local store. Hoctun, a town in the middle of the road
    Her name means pure, traditional, where the stone is started, as the result of the voices Hoc, uprooting or safar and tun, stone. Its foundation was started from 1821 when Yucatan declares independence from the Spanish Crown.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • ciaobella55's Profile Photo

    Horse & buggy tour around town

    by ciaobella55 Written Sep 29, 2010
    Buggy no 23 with his strong little horse

    This is a great way to see the town and the acheological sites. If you go by foot the sites are a fair distance and it's HOT here, so it's well worth the 80 pesos for 1/2 hour. Your guide will give you explanations in Spanish and then drop you off wherever you want, you can get out and take photos.

    The buggies are covered so you are out of the sun.

    It was delightful clip-clopping around town, and very relaxing

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Disabilities
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    The 3 hills of Izamal

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jun 21, 2007

    Izamal, according to legend, was founded by Itzamna ("Dew from Heaven"), later revered as a sky god. When he died his body was divided into 3 parts which were then buried under the three hills in Izamal. Three temples were built on these hills and Izamal became a place of pilgrimage, from all over the country.

    My guide book was VERY vague but I had the impression that there was nothing, really but ruins, to see of these three temples. However, deciding that seeings we were going to be in Izamal we should go and see them.... We were totally and absolutely incapable of finding them and all we managed to do was make a couple of old Mexicans laugh as we drove around and around in and out of town!... and one of these pyramids is said to have been the largest in the whole of Mexico!!!

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Convento de San Antonio de Padua

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jun 21, 2007
    1 more image

    When the Spaniards arrived in Izamal theyu destroyed Popul-Chac pyramid, the major Mayan temple. With it's stones they built Convento de San Antonio de Padua, one of the first monasteries in the Western hemisphere. The build started in 1533 and was completed in 1561.

    The principle church is the Santuario de la Virgen de Izamal. On 15th August every year, in the courtyard, there is a fiesta of the Virgin of Izamal.

    Entry into the church is free. We visited in the afternoon and it was all shut up for siesta! A better time would be to go in the morning when you know it is definitely going to be open.

    In 1993 John Paul II visited and so the monastery and church had a bit of a spruce up!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Interior of convent

    by karenincalifornia Written Jan 23, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Convento de San  Antonio de Padua

    The Convent of San Antonio de Padua in Izamal a destination for Catholics making a pilgrimage to pray at the feel of Lady of Izamal. The interior is austere, except for the ornate guilded area around the altar.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Franciscan Convent

    by karenincalifornia Written Jan 23, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Convent at Izamal, MX

    Located in the center of town is the Convent of San Antonio de Padua. It's a magnificent building in terms of size, architecture and mustard yellow color against a bright blue sky. The Convent was built on top of a Mayan temple, and many stones in the temple were used for construction of the convent. In some places, it is possible to fine carved Mayan stones integrated into the stonework of the walkways.

    The ruins in Izamal are not well-preserved. When the Spaniards came into to Izamal, they destroyed what remained of the Mayan structures. What is left now are basically mounds of rubble.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Explore the Yellow

    by karenincalifornia Written Jan 23, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Central Plaza in Izamal

    Izamal is a very walkable city. It's possible to see most of the sights on foot. This picture shows the central park in Izamal, which is a pretty little park next to the convent. It is not visable in this picture, but just beyond the park is one of the ancient Mayan structures - there are several around the town center. The city of Izamal was built right on top of and around the ruins. We noticed people climbing on the temple in the background, so apparently they don't have the same prohibitions against climbing that we saw in Uxmal and Chichen Itza.

    Next to the central park are taxi drivers with horses and carts hustling for tourists. They weren't getting many takers. They will offer to take tourists on a tour around town, but we were short on time, so we just explored on foot.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    Evidence of Importance of the Sun & Mayas

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Jun 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Symbol of SUN on Kinich Kak Mo Stairs

    The vibrant and beautiful Yellow color of the city of Izamal evident in the walls of streets and houses has historical significance.

    From what a local who himself was half Mayan told us, the color yellow signifies the color of

    1) The SUN
    2) The CORN

    both of which were extremely important to the Mayans. How much truth there is to this fact, I would leave for the historians to argue but I found it very interesting to see symbolizm in the streets of the sun everywhere..

    The picture is taken of one of the stairs leading up to the Kinich Kak Mo Pyramid. The symbol is that of the SUN which had to be of some importance if it was carved on the stairs leading up to the pyramid.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    Kinich Kak Mo Pyramid of Izamal

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Jun 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kinich Kak Mo Pyramid in Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico

    Kinich Kak Mo pyramid of Izamal is a short walk from the Monastary and it is open daily with no admission. It is a huge pyramid, not so well maintained and excavated as some of the other pyramids of the Yucatan region but its size is amazing.

    Getting to the top of the pyramid involves a graudal but stiff climb over several levels since it consists of one pyramid base with another whole pyramid on top.

    In mayan times the entire space between the Kinich Kak Mo and where the monastary now stands was just one great square which may have well been one of the biggest of all Mayan Plazas.

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    Inside the Monastary of San Antonio de Padua

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Jun 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside the Monastary of San Antonio de Padua

    This picture is taken inside of the Monastary of San Antonio de Padua. It was a beautiful scene as we entered and saw some locals sitting on the benches praying as there was no mass going on.

    The Monastary of the Convent house as it is called often is said to be built where there was a Mayan Pyramid in 16th century by the Fransiscans who came to the city and used the same stones of the pyramid in the construction of the Monastary. The shrine in the picture is the original from 16th century brought by the Spaniards and it is beautiful.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    Monastary of San Antonio De Padua

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Jun 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monastary of San Antonio de Padua

    The Monastary or the Convent house is situated across the city square. As you go up the stairs, passed the gates and into the courtyard, you come across a big courtyard infront of which is the church.

    The courtyard is beautifully painted with yellow walls and yellow columns hence the color of the city. Inside the courtyard by the church's enterance, is the statue of Pope John Paul II in memorance of his visit to this religious city in 1993. When we visited the monastary, Pope John Paul had just passed away and his statue had many bouquets of flowers and photographs decorating its base.

    The Monastary is a must see and can be said to be the main attraction of the city. It is well worth the visit and one can spend a good 2 to 3 hours exploring its hidden treasures and history.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    A Plaza in Izamal near Convent House

    by RedEaredPanda Updated Jun 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue of Monk Fray Diego de Larna in Izamal

    Neighboring the Convent house in Izamal is this little plaza with the statue of Monk Fray Diego the Larna with the yellow buildings of the city of Izamal surrounding it.
    When the Spanairds first came to Mexico and the city of Izamal, they had missions of converting the Mayans to Christianity. Hence they destroyed many old Mayan pyramids and structures and built their colonial houses.

    Under the orders of Monk Fray Diego the Larna, Mayan pyramid was destroyed and its place, the Convent house which exists today was built. For this reason, many inhabitants of the city of Izamal, many of which are Mayans, do not like this historical figure.

    Never the less, this statue has historical significance and is well worth the visit.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Kinich-Kakmo pyramid

    by darthmilmo Written Mar 5, 2003

    Another pyramid worth climbing is the Kinich-Kakmo pyramid. It offers superb views of the surrounding areas. Since the Yucatan peninsula is maid of lowlands, you can really see for miles and miles away.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    El Convento de San Antonio de Padua

    by darthmilmo Written Mar 5, 2003

    El Convento de San Antonio de Padua is located right in the middle of downtown Izamal. You really can't miss it :). According to the "Let's Go Mexico," it is the second largest convent in the world, surpassed only by the Vatican. Although it is surely a beautiful sight, it pales in comparison to the magnitude of the Vatican (pretty much any church/convent will don't you think?). Check out the traditional yellow paint of the building.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Luxury Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Izamal

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

75 travelers online now

Comments

Izamal Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Izamal things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Izamal sightseeing.

View all Izamal hotels