Mérida Favorites

  • Flag of Mexico
    Flag of Mexico
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Merida centre
    Merida centre
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Merida centre
    Merida centre
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey

Most Recent Favorites in Mérida

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Outdoor pool in the hotel

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 10, 2013

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    Outdoor pool in the hotel
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    Fondest memory: One of the fondest memory I always remember out of my trip to Mexico is my swimming in January and February. It was cold winter that time in Moscow.
    As I have already written I took every chance to swim in every hotel pool in this trip along Mexico. That’s why swimming in the outdoor pool in the Hotel Hyatt Regency Merida was especially pleasant for me. And I will remember it not less than all the best Merida’s attractions.

    The outdoor pool located on the 3rd floor of the hotel. You can enjoy sunny days in the city, either swimming or sunbathing.
    Access is offered exclusively to registered guests.
    Hours: Daily 8:00am to 8:00pm
    Kids area depth: 2.94 ft
    Pool depth: 5.43 ft

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Mérida as it was for me in February of 2011

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 8, 2013

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    Flag of Mexico
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    Favorite thing: Our path from Mayan Ruinas Uxmal to Ruinas Chichén-Itzá was led through Mérida - the capital of the Mexican State of Yucatán and largest city of the Yucatán Peninsula.
    It is located in the northwest part of the state, about 80 km from Uxmal, about 120 km from Chichén-Itzá and about 35 km from the Gulf of Mexico coast.
    We spent there half a day, then a night before we continued our ride along Yucatan.

    Useful information:
    City Hall Information Center
    Street level of the City Hall
    Calle 62 between 61 and 63;

    City Council Contact Service
    Phone: (999) 942 00 00, Ext. 8011

    Paseo de Montejo Information Module
    Paseo Montejo (Calle 56-A) and Calle 33-A
    www.merida.gob.mx

    You can watch my 4 min 07 sec Video Mexico Merida part 1 out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Dinero

    by karenincalifornia Updated Jan 11, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pesos

    Favorite thing: ATMs are prevalent in Merida, so we had no problem exchanging money. In addition, several shops had exchange windows open in the evening. On the other hand, I didn't see the bank open once - great banker's hours in Merida. ATMs will not be so easy to find in the small towns. If you leave Merida on a day trip, in addition to filling up your tank, make sure you have pesos to last you through the day.

    It seemed that dollars would be accepted in a pinch, but pesos were used more often. Where US dollars could be used, the exchange rate was still the usual 10 pesos to 1 dollar to make the math easy -- just like last year. That's not a great rate since the US dollar is now worth over 11 pesos. You're better off having a supply of pesos with you at all times, and tip like hell just before you fly back home.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    A not so white city

    by karenincalifornia Written Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Paseo de Montejo, Merida, MX

    Favorite thing: Before we arrived in Merida, I read that Merida is a "white city". I pretty much forgot that once I got to Merida, because white is not necessarily the predominant color of buildings. Really, anything goes, and many of the buildings are painted in vibrant earth tones, pastels, and even this aquamarine color, which reminds me of one the houses I grew up in.

    Fondest memory: Aquamarine houses look better here in Merida than they do in Federal Way, Washington.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Tank Art

    by karenincalifornia Written Jan 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Art sculpture on Paseo de Montejo, Merida MX

    Favorite thing: The City of Merida has recently commissioned many artists to create works of art that are displayed in various parts of the city, with a high concentration of artwork on Paseo de Montejo. Walk along the boulevard and admire the many original sculptures on the sidewalks.

    Paseo de Montejo is also the location of the city's Carnival procession.

    Fondest memory: We especially liked this Sherman Tank built out of industrial cannisters and pipes.

    Related to:
    • Festivals
    • Arts and Culture

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  • karenincalifornia's Profile Photo

    Spectacular Paseo de Montejo

    by karenincalifornia Written Jan 10, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Camara House on Paseo de Montejo, Merida, MX
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    Favorite thing: Extending northward from the Centro Historico is the beautiful Paseo de Montejo, a wide boulevard lined with ornate turn of the century (20th century) mansions. Paseo de Montejo is in stark contrast to most of the rest of Merida, which has less spectacular buildings and consists mostly of working class neighborhoods.

    Many of the buildings are now occupied by businesses. Some are in disrepair. Approaching Ave. Colon, the buildings are in better shape. The intersection of Ave Colon and Paseo de Montejo is the location of several large newer hotels, such as Fiesta Americana, Holiday Inn, Hyatt and Intercontinental. In this area, it is easy to forget that one is in a struggling developing country with a shaky economy. In fact, we felt as if we had been transported suddenly to the United States, with its large hotels and glitzy shopping malls.

    If Holiday Inns or Hyatts are your preference, you will likely want to stay in this area. If you want to experience a more authentic part of Merida, I recommend the small hotels and inns southward in the Centro Historico.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    sundays II

    by leffe3 Updated Apr 5, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Favorite thing: But if you want more traditional Mexican music (and prefer to sit and watch!) then head for the more central Parque Hidalgo - with the outdoor terraces of the various cafes and bars, a great place to listen to the music, chill out and people watch. But there's always someone who can't resist the rhythms. And then's there's always some that find it too much to deal with :) Plus the Iglesia de Jeus, Pinacoteca del Estado provides the perfect backdrop.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    narrow streets

    by leffe3 Updated Apr 5, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Favorite thing: A distinct one-way system and a grid lay out make it very easy to find your way round. The narrow streets also add to the atmosphere of a busy, bustling city, with the open space of the central Plaza Mayor the main 'landmark' of the city.

    Fondest memory: Amazingly friendly

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    sundays

    by leffe3 Updated Apr 3, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Favorite thing: Try and ensure you are in the city on a Sunday - the squares and parks become open-air concerts and dance venues! And not just traditional Marriachi either - 1950s 'ballroom' style dancing is very popular in Parque Santa Lucia, with hundreds of locals taking up with their partners (and some great local food on offer too)

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    markets

    by leffe3 Updated Apr 3, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Markets abound in central Merida, where you can buy fresh fruit and other local produce as well as everyday items. Favourite items were Tommy Half-Finger goods - which were everywhere LOL

    Central de Abastos (south of the Zocalo) is the biggest: indoor and in the streets around it.

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  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Sisal and Haciendas

    by Redlats Updated Jul 6, 2005

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    A sisal plant growing wild

    Favorite thing: When we drove from Uxmal to Celestun, we passed six or more haciendas. These deserted haciendas are linked to the henequen or sisal plant. Until the discovery of the plastic industry (during World War I approximately), the threads from the sisal plant were used to make rope -- especially rope for ships as it weathered well.

    This plant grew well in the Yucatan, and the haciendados (hacienda owners) became very rich exporting sisal. Mérida was the preferred home for many of these millionaires, and they built their fancy homes on Paseo Montejo.

    As I indicated earlier, you can walk or drive down Paseo Montejo to see some of these mansions - some of which are restored. Once nylons and the like became the standard for rope-making, sisal became worth much less, and there are not other crops than could be built in the desert with no irrigation, so most of the mansions were deserted.

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  • AnnaLupilla's Profile Photo

    Cultural Life

    by AnnaLupilla Written Nov 26, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Mérida celebrates an intense cultural life 365 days of the year, and the thousands of visitors become spectators in this ongoing fact of daily life.
    The city, captivating and enchanting, is committed to constantly improving that image to the world. As such, every night the historical downtown district hosts an unforgettable cultural evening such as the traditional Yucatecan "jarana" (dance) presented in front of the City Hall every Monday evening; on Sunday when music filling the air with the salsa and cumbia rhythems of two orchestras. There are also theater presentations, folk dances and movies in cultural centers for the scenic arts such as the Mérida Theater located just a few steps away from the Main Square.

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  • Sandi-2004's Profile Photo

    MEXICO'S SOUTHERN TIP CURVES EAST

    by Sandi-2004 Updated Nov 24, 2004

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    The Yucatan Peninsula curves east

    Favorite thing: Until I started planning this trip, I hadn't paid close attention to the way Mexico curves so far to the east in the southern tip. Merida is actually straight south of New Orleans, LA, and Cancun is very close to Cuba. The Yucatan is less than 200 miles from the Equator, so bring you're sun screen and get a hotel with a pool because the sun is intense. I had a good natural sunscreen and had no problems.

    Enlarging the map will show you exactly where the Merida & Cancun are located.

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  • katmai's Profile Photo

    European Mexico

    by katmai Written Nov 14, 2004

    Favorite thing: Though many visitors to the Yucatan head for the beaches of Cancun making Merida your home base for a few days is very good. Merida has a european feel to it given it's arcitecture seems to have spanish colonial influences and possibly french as well. The broad avenue lined with trees adds to this.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Sandi-2004's Profile Photo

    MERIDA ENGLISH LIBRARY

    by Sandi-2004 Updated Nov 13, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Merida English Library

    Favorite thing: The Merida English Library (MEL) is in El Centro and has several rooms of books as well as computers for use of the internet. It also has a lovely patio and garden behind the building for a quiet spot to relax and read in the shade of the trees.

    The volunteers who work at the library are very kind and helpful. Also, the library sponsors monthly social gathering for expats and local folks to come together and chat either at the library or a restaurant. They offer other meetings as well.

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