Ruinas Chichén-Itzá Local Customs

  • Hevea
    Hevea
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Hevea
    Hevea
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Hevea
    Hevea
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey

Most Recent Local Customs in Ruinas Chichén-Itzá

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Aztec’s and Maya’s chewing gum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Apr 18, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ancient Aztecs used chicle as a base for making a gum-like substance. Chicle is a natural gum traditionally used in making chewing gum and other products. It is collected from several species of Mesoamerican trees.
    Modern chewing gum was first developed in the 1860s when chicle was imported from Mexico for use as a rubber substitute.
    Mayan tribes used as chewing gum sap of rubber trees – rubber. Best of all -
    Hevea that is a genus of flowering plants in the spurge family, Euphorbiaceae.

    Hevea Hevea Hevea Hevea
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Chichen Services Best

    by Maruh Written Apr 22, 2008

    We just came back from a wonderful journey to the Yucatan. We highly recommend to those wishing to have a great cultural experience and get involved with Maya traditions and ecological treasures, to check the many vacation packages offered by www.chichenservice.com, we were lucky to plan our trip with them, saved money and had the most amazing three days ever in Yucatan, a place we have traveled throughout the years. We booked a combo of packages and ended up enjoying fully our stay in Chichen Itza, an archaeological site we had first visited in a regular day-trip bus style visit (we hated it, too hot and crowded, not enough time to truly understand the temples' history etc.). This time we wanted to truly experience the Maya culture at its best. After such great trip (we stayed at Hacienda Chichen and had some great experiences at Yaxkin Spa) we wanted to share with those that plan to visit the site, our understanding that Chichen Itza is more than just a famous great pyramid called "el castillo". We don't recommend travelers just to "check it out for a few minutes" but actually visit the area. A day trip to Chichen Itza is very disappointing, but a full two or three days there is highly uplifting and magical.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Mayan Designs

    by Blatherwick Updated Aug 25, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Mayan really make clothing with colourful designs. If you get a chance, get out of the usual tourist route and take a look around an authentic Mayan village. Be respectful of the villager's privacy and buy some of their goods if they're available. You'll be helping these villages economies and getting an idea of how these people really live. Note that this picture is of a village on the tourist trail and some poor monkey is chained in the yard. I didn't take pictures in the village I visited.

    Mayan Designs
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kaspian's Profile Photo

    Tour Guides

    by Kaspian Updated Dec 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most of these guys really know their stuff. Others can be complete lunatics. In general you will get much more out of your tour through a live guide because there are not many signs posted around the park telling you where to go and what you're looking at. Some guides give detailed historical perspectives of the Chichen Itza site and the Mayan people while others like to talk on about Earth coordinates, Nostradamus, Egyptian pyramids, and far-fetched mathematical equations. If you think your guide may be a little "out of it," find out what time you have to be back at your tour bus and then slowly slink away. Try and sneak in with a different tour group to see if their guide is any better. The reverse is also true; if history bores you and you'd rather get the "DaVinci Code" version, look for a conspiracy guide (they generally look less reserved and more animated).
    You will also be expected to tip your guide at the end of the tour. If you came on a bus daytrip, this may be when they drop you off back at your hotel. There will be a basket at the front exit of the bus and the tip goes to the driver as well. $10 - $20 is a good tip for the entire day. If you only used a guide at the park, leave him $5 - $10 (more if there were very few people in his group).

    Chichen Itza - Tour Guide (2002)
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    3 INTERESTING INTERNET PAGES

    by cbeaujean Written Mar 9, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    WWW.TRAVELYUCATAN.COM
    info about mayan road,with maps,transportation and archeological tips.

    WWW.ECOYUC.COM
    to prepare tours....bike,kayak,,underwater activities and speleology.

    WWW.MEXONLINE.COM
    choose "travel" link....:a lot of practical infos

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Joan58's Profile Photo

    A sad thing

    by Joan58 Updated Jan 2, 2003

    When you leave the site you could be besieged by sellers. They are Maya people who try to sell their carving woods. They are not allowed to get near you, so you must go to them if you want to buy something.
    And now you can see how the descendants of an ancient people which splendour you have just admired earn their living. Isn't it just a little sad thing?

    The Group of the Thousand Columns

    Was this review helpful?

  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    CHACMOOL

    by alyf1961 Written Feb 8, 2009

    Chacmool is a pre-Columbian Mesoamerican stone statue. These statues are found in some Mexican sites such as Chichen Itsa.

    CHACMOOL

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Ruinas Chichén-Itzá

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

43 travelers online now

Comments

Ruinas Chichén-Itzá Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Ruinas Chichén-Itzá local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Ruinas Chichén-Itzá sightseeing.

View all Ruinas Chichén-Itzá hotels