Ruinas Chichén-Itzá Off The Beaten Path

  • Model of traditional Maya House
    Model of traditional Maya House
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by madeinbelfast

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Ruinas Chichén-Itzá

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Model of traditional Maya House

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Apr 18, 2013

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    Model of traditional Maya House
    1 more image

    Walking from the Great Plaza to the Central Group you will see the model of the traditional Maya House or a building that scientists consider to look like a traditional Maya House.
    The Maya people constitute a diverse range of the Native American people of southern Mexico and northern Central America. The overarching term "Maya" is a collective designation to include the peoples of the region who share some degree of cultural and linguistic heritage; however, the term embraces many distinct populations, societies, and ethnic groups, who each have their own particular traditions, cultures, and historical identity.
    There are an estimated 6 million Maya living in this area at the start of the 21st century.

    You can watch my photo of Chichen-Itza on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 20° 40' 52.80" N 88° 34' 6.54" W or on my Google Earth Panoramio Model of traditional Maya House.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Ik Kil Cenote

    by madeinbelfast Updated Apr 4, 2011
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    After a sweltering hot day at Chichen Itza We needed to cool off. On the way back to Playa Del Carmen we stoped of at Ik Kil Cenote. Its very close to Chichen Itza. This place is beautiful. Their are lookout points at different levels as you go down the steps so you can stop and take photos from different angles. The water is very deep and quite cold. I saw lots of little black fish swimming around. You can hire life vests if you are not a confident swimmer. The cenote has good changing facilities and also a small cafe and souvenir shop.

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    • Family Travel

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    Go for a swim with the dead!

    by wilocrek Written Dec 28, 2007

    If the heat and or the living get to you, why not cool off with a dip in a Mayan burial pool! Who knows who you may meet down there! By the way the path that leads here is lined with a bunch of annoying vendors so feel free to invite a few of them to join their ancestors!

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  • kirstylm's Profile Photo

    Underground cenote - Dzitnup

    by kirstylm Written Sep 29, 2006

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    Dzitnup cenote

    There's a small underground cenote where you can swim!!! Swimming in a cave - very cool!!!! You pay a small amount entrance fee, and then need to walk down a few narrow steps to get into the cave. Its only a few metres below ground, and was supposedly found when a farmer's pig fell through a hole in the ground, which turned out to be the hole in the the roof of the cave! So while you're swimming, you can catch the sun as it streams through the hole in the roof and illuminates the crystal-clear blue water. The water is quite cool and refreshing. If you have a mask (goggles), well worth taking them with you. There is lots of space inside to leave bags and clothes.

    You can get there by taxi from Valladolid (few km's away), and we then also caught a taxi from there to Chichen Itza.

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    The sacred cenote

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 25, 2006

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    the sacred cenote

    A cenote is a natural water hole, and the one of Chichen Itza is no different (apparently) than other cenotes. There are two cenotes in Chichen Itza, but the most important one is the Sacred Cenote because of its religious meaning.

    In the 20th century an explorer and archaeologist called Edwad Thomson had the cenote dragged to see what was in there: he found some gold, some metal ornaments and some human bones. he therefore had the proof that the cenote was also used for human sacrifices to the rain god.

    Surprisingly, however, he discovered that the human victims were not only young maidens, but also boys and... warriors, too.

    To find the Sacred Cenote just follow the fathway flanked by vendors... they'll lead you there.

    Related to:
    • Archeology

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    Chichen Viejo

    by Blatherwick Updated Aug 25, 2005
    Chichen Viejo

    The old part of Chichen is located about 1 km away from the Nunnery. Unrestored ruins lie scattered around the Jungle. It was founded about 400 A.D. by the Maya and governed by priests. This area is original Mayan and bears close resemblance to the Puuc architecture. There are many representations of the god Chac, the Maya rain god.

    To get there take the dirt road to the right of the Nunnery, past other intersections of dirt roads to a well. Shortly beyond the well, a right at the T-junction brings you to the ruins.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Archeology

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  • shdw100's Profile Photo

    Columns

    by shdw100 Written Oct 3, 2003

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    I was facinated about how through the centuries structures like this have survived. In the Yucatan, you have the jungle, the humidity, and the occasional hurricane, but Mayans built their cities to last forever. These columns were interesting with the small rocks and chips cemented in between the larger stones, hence making the whole structure straight and level! The Mayans definately new their architecture and math!

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    The Sacred Cenote

    by Joan58 Written Feb 25, 2003

    When you go to visit the Sacred Cenote it's better if you don't go off the beaten path! If you fall into the cenote no one could get you out of there! I'm just kidding.
    The sight of the Sacred Cenote is very striking. When I saw it and thought to all the people who were thrown into as sacrificial victims, I felt a sensation to be in a holy place. A terrifying, but enchanting place.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    called the church...(?)....

    by cbeaujean Written Feb 25, 2003

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    small building with a flowing frieze,in fact a snake.
    in the two niches,on the facade,you can see:
    on left:an armadillo and a snail
    on right:a turtle and a crab
    maybe weddings...so it's the reason for calling this building church!!!

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    • Adventure Travel

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  • NitnyLeo's Profile Photo

    Inside El Castillo....

    by NitnyLeo Written Sep 10, 2002

    At the base of El Castillo, is an entrance to the interior of this great pyramid. Inside you will find another pyramid over which El Castillo was built. They have a prohibition against flash photography inside and, therefore, have a guard posted at the entrance.

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  • hanspeter_W.'s Profile Photo

    impressive subterranean natural formation

    by hanspeter_W. Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Cenote X'Keken
    better known as Dzitnup is an impressive subterranean natural formation, located one mile from Valladolid, Yucatan

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    • Adventure Travel

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  • guybert's Profile Photo

    Coming back from Chichen...

    by guybert Written Sep 22, 2002

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    Coming back from Chichen Itza we stopped off at what the guide advised was the largest sinkhole in the area.

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