Ruinas Chichén-Itzá Warnings and Dangers

  • Slowly crawling my way down on all fours
    Slowly crawling my way down on all fours
    by RoseAmano
  • "Never again"
    by RoseAmano
  • Chichen Itza - Mexico
    Chichen Itza - Mexico
    by solopes

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Ruinas Chichén-Itzá

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    Think about the descent

    by solopes Updated Jan 13, 2014

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    Chichen Itza - Mexico

    It's a temptation, climbing to the pyramid!

    However, you may be warned that, once in the top, everything changes: the steps are narrow and steep.

    Once up there, you turn back, and before a deep breed with the clouds giving the sensation that you are in a bouncing platform, it will seem that the steps... were gone, replaced by a long and extremely steep ramp.

    The risk is not big, and a current in the middle of the stairs help the most frightened and sensible to vertigo. But... you'd better be warned!

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    Gas Station Scams!!!

    by wilocrek Written Apr 28, 2008

    I have driven all over the Yucatan and filled up and numerous Pemex gas stations, but it was the one right next to Chichen Itza that tried to cheat me. They of course insist on filling up your tank for you and and as I was watching the counter on the gas tank I noticed a few moments after it stopped pumping the price on the pump almost doubled. That gas attendant tried to charge me the amount on the pump but luckily for me I had noticed what the exact amount had been before the pump price changed and I refused to pay the higher amount and even pointed out to the attendant that my car didn't even hold that much gas. After I pointed this out the attendant quickly accepted my payment for the correct amount without even an apology. Moral of this story is watch the pump price very carefully while they are filling up you tank and make sure you pay the correct amount. The gas station I'm referring to is the one just outside Chichen Itza on the road to Vallidod, you can't miss it as its the only one.

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    "Let's Get Physical, Physical..."

    by spgood301 Written Aug 23, 2007

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    Aaaah, there's nothing that screams "Mexico!!!" like driving through the Yucatan countryside, on the way back from Chichen Itza, listening to...the Best of Olivia Newton-John! Yep, that's what they had playing on the bus.

    I'll always have fond memories of Olivia after that heeheeeee!!!

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    Hot Hot Hot!

    by spgood301 Written Aug 23, 2007

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    I guess it goes without saying that the interior of Mexico gets a little hot in the middle of August. When the sun's beating down on you. And you're out in an open field. Yep, that describes my day at Chichen Itza. A great day, but a HOT day.

    If you're doing a tour, your guide should give you a bottle of water when you leave the bus. Bottled water is also for sale throughout the ruins. Make sure you dress light - light shirt, pants. And if you're susceptible to sunburn like me, make sure you wear a hat - there's some shade at Chichen Itza, but much of it is in the wide-open sun.

    Take care of yourself out there.

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    • Archeology
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  • False reading at Gas pumps

    by cherylwatersOH Written Aug 15, 2007

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    I had this happen to me while having a rental car filled up near Cancun. The attendant filled the tank then covered up the price area on the pump and tried to charge us dollars by the amount of fuel dispensed (which was considerably more).

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    • Beaches

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  • Rental Cars

    by cherylwatersOH Written Aug 15, 2007

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    Be careful to document every little scrape or spot on your rental car as even in the nice hotels, rental agents will try to charge you for damage to your car that you did not cause. I had this happen to me at the Westin in Cancun and they would not intervene. I had to threaten to call the police.

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  • Conspirator's Profile Photo

    Why do you need so many pillars

    by Conspirator Updated Sep 17, 2006

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    Based on the
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    Despite being made of fibreglass, the meticulously laid out pillars stretching away from the Temple of Warriors really were nicely done by the contractors.

    What truly was hilarious was my guide's explanation for why the "Mayans" had built these. He explained that the structure housed all of the Mayan warriors and made "spear stabbing" motions to emphasize this. I asked him why the warriors needed so many pillars and he said "I told you" and made spear stabbing motions again.

    "What," pressed the Conspirator "did they duck behind the pillars to practice avoiding the spears?" Guide threw up his hands in exasperation and asked me whether I expected him to know everything.

    Moral of the story: Make sure your guide is not an idiot and actually knows something about the site you are visiting.

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  • Conspirator's Profile Photo

    The big "human sacrifice" fairytale

    by Conspirator Written Sep 17, 2006

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    Jaguar eating advocado
    1 more image

    One of the themes that sucks the crowds into Chichen Itza is human sacrifice, which supposedly happened on a massive scale during the Toltec period. The attached photo, from the imaginatively named Platform of Eagles and Jaguars, is a picture your guide will doubtless take you to to show "evidence" of the human sacrifice story.

    Apparently (according to the plaque in front of it and your guide) the jaguar (symbolizing the Toltec people) is holding a human heart in its claw and devouring it.

    Human heart? What a load of cobblers! Looks more like an advocado to me.

    Yes, yes, there is another platform engraved with hundreds of skulls, but we all know that the Chinese built this one.

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  • Conspirator's Profile Photo

    5-star luxury coming soon to Chichen Itza

    by Conspirator Written Sep 17, 2006

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    Sacred jacuzzi

    This murky green "sacred" cenote is associated with all sorts of gory "legends" ... virgins and warriors sacrificed by having their hearts ripped out were supposed to have been buried here to speed their passage to heaven.

    Speaking to some of the locals, I uncovered the real story. Apparently this was to be a huge swimming pool at the center of a 5 star resort complex next to the "ruins". However, runoff from monsoonal rains kept washing detritus into the pool, making it the color it is today and putting the breaks on construction.

    The authorities are working on a landscaping plan that will divert the rain runoff and construction on the resort should start again soon.

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  • Conspirator's Profile Photo

    Location of the Evidence

    by Conspirator Written Sep 17, 2006

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    Red Handed
    1 more image

    This is where to look on El Castillo to see the "Made in China" stone.

    And, by the way, the reason why you cannot climb El Castillo anymore is obviously not because some old lady fell over and knocked herself off. It's because all the traffic at the top knocked a hole in a fibreglass brick and you could see the scaffolding inside that holds the whole structure up. Sneak in there late at night with a flashlight (as I did) and you'll see exactly what I mean.

    One more fabrication to clear up - this whole "Snake appears at the equinox" thing is an egregious lie to stock up more tourism in what is traditionally a dull period. The rocks are actually painted with paint that is sensitive to a particular frequency of light that it shone on the structure by the floodlights you see everywhere (I suppose your guide told you the Mayans build the floodlights too?)

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  • Conspirator's Profile Photo

    Evidence for all to see

    by Conspirator Written Sep 17, 2006

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    Chinese Mayans?

    After several hours of searching, I found the indisputable evidence photographed here.

    All of the "stones" in the stucture are actually made out of a kind of polyethylene/fibreglass compound. When you think about it, who could possibly believe that a bunch of stone age savages created such spectacular buildings with fine lines and straight edges. Now, all of these "stones" have the mark of their origin, but of course they are turned inward so tourists can't see.

    They somehow made a mistake with this one. It's near the base of El Castillo, you can see for yourself.

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  • RoseAmano's Profile Photo

    Depending on your perspective, a warning or sport.

    by RoseAmano Updated May 19, 2006
    Pyramid, Chichen Itza
    2 more images

    Going up with your front facing the steps was not so bad, but going down for me was pretty scary. Fortunately, I made it back even though feeling completely humiliated, thinking "Never again"...

    In hindsight, thinking that if viewed with the perspective of descending a ladder, going down with your front facing the steps might have been quicker and less scary (if the steps were easily grasped by the hands)....or am I just delusional because I forgot how it scary it felt... -)

    It was strange watching experienced tour guides gracefully glide up and down quickly, with rock-climbing sneakers, bypassing my clumsy movements.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    So hot!!!

    by clairegeordio Updated May 15, 2006

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    In August, as you can imagine, Chichen Itza was an extremely hot place to be! So if you are visiting, especially at this time of year it would adviseable to bring plenty of sunscreen, insect repellent and we had massive golfing umbrellas to cover us from the sun - this was invaluable as there is no shade, and we took plenty of water with us.

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  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Climbing down the pyramid

    by clairegeordio Written Mar 27, 2006

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    If at all you do get the chance to climb the pyramid, be extra careful, especially climbing down - it is very dangerous. On one side there is a rope going down the middle that can help people. Don't be too proud to come down slowly on all fours!

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    beware of heights

    by call_me_rhia Written Jan 25, 2006

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    people climbing the pyramid

    Beware of heights when climbing Chichen Itza's Castillo. Yes, there is a rope to help you, especially going down - but there are also people who fell nevertheless... Serious injuries are assured.

    And if you think that it won't happen to you, think twice abot it.. why would there be an ambulance stationed by the base of the Pyramid if no one ever fell?

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Ruinas Chichén-Itzá Warnings and Dangers

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