Valladolid Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by ciaobella55
  • Things to Do
    by ciaobella55
  • Local kids cooling off
    Local kids cooling off
    by brkilbourne

Most Recent Things to Do in Valladolid

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    Dzitnup cenote

    by solopes Updated Dec 31, 2013

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    Valladolid - Mexico
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    In Yucatan water flows quickly to a low level, being accessible through big holes called cenotes.

    We visited this one, a big cave with a natural pool inside.

    It was cool, and no one risked a swim, but there was someone doing it.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Eco-Tourism

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    City centre

    by solopes Updated Feb 19, 2013
    Valladolid - Mexico
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    This calm city, displayed around a central garden bordered by the church and some typical buildings, was a good opportunity to start living real Mexico, after a week in the artificial paradise of Cancun.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Swimming in cenotes Samula and Dzitnup

    by jiaseto Updated Jan 4, 2011

    We paid 50 pesos for a taxi to take us to Cenotes Dzitnup and Samula, about 7 km away from town. The 2 cenotes are right next to each other. Water is crystal clear with fishes swimming around and the caves are impressive. We went to Dzitnup first. There were many people swimming in it. Later we walked across the street to Samula. Cenote Samula is even prettier with an opening at the top of the cave like a natural skylight creating a dramatic effect on the water. We swam in Samula and it was a fun experience not to be missed. You can also ride a bike to the cenotes. We saw a bike path along side the road to the cenotes. Tips: wear swim suit before you go as there is no place to change.

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  • Private Mexican folk art museum

    by diehardtraveler Written Nov 17, 2010

    WOW!

    You won't believe how much art this retired American couple has collected over 30 years....over 3,000 pieces. The live in a restored 400 year old hacienda style house about 1/3 block from the town main square (easy to find) They give tours every day at 10 AM - but we rang their door bell and they gave us a tour in the after noon since we were leaving he next morning. Very accomodating.

    We would highly rcommend visiting their home. it has also wons some architectural awards too.

    They also have some postcards with pictures of the interior of the house and some of their art to take home.

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    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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    Ek Balam

    by dila Written Aug 12, 2009
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    Near my hotel i could share a taxi with some Mexican people who were waiting at the same stop. The taxi leaves untill it is full and you share the price. Think as tourist you pay more but ok.
    The first picture i went up all there fantastic view and i still dont understand how i went down as i was scared to go down it was terrible steep and i really really didnot like that.

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Zaci cenote

    by brkilbourne Written Jun 15, 2009
    Local kids cooling off
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    Swim in cool ( cold ) waters like the Myans did 2000 years ago in the Zaci cenote, which is the original Myan name for Valladolid. Just to take a walk on the path is a refreshing respite from the heat. 20 pesos admission fee. Nice restaurant. Check out the Xtabentun a Myan drink made from honey and anise and rum. A mild licorice flavor .

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    Cenote Zaci

    by dila Written Aug 6, 2008
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    The French couple and me wanted to see Cenote Zaci. we arrived at 17.10 and it was closed.
    But some nice guard let us go to the restaurant and from here we could make some nice pictures.
    Open 8.00-17.00
    Entrance 15 adult 10 kids toilet 2 pesos

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    Cenote Dzitnup (Xkakah) (Xkeken)

    by dila Updated Aug 6, 2008
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    3 march 2008
    Tina (German girl i met at Chichen Itza) wanted to see the cenote Dzitnup so i joined her.
    We paid 200 pesos for a taxi together (think that was a lot to much) so 100 each.
    He would bring us then wait 30 minutes and then bring us back to the zocalo in Valladolid.
    It is 10 a 15 minutes with the taxi.
    Entrance 25 pesos
    video 30 pesos.
    Open i left at 16.20 and an busload tourist came then. so think open till 17.00
    Some childern were swimming in the water.
    My pictures are bad. I did make them lighter with photoshop.
    It is a bit steep and you really need to watch your head.
    you can hold on a rope as it is also a bit slippery.
    Biantim went to this on a bike so maybe thats a better idea.
    dont forget swimming stuff

    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    Chichén Itzá

    by dila Updated Aug 6, 2008
    El Castillo north side

    3 march 2008
    I took the bus from 7.15 from Valladolid to Chichén Itzá at the busstation i met a german girl Tina and we stayed together. (It is always nice to have some pictures of yourself)
    Bus cost 20 pesos each way. Return ticket (10.35) you can buy later at Chichén Itzá (was not open yet when we arrived. It is still quiet not many people around 8.00. very nice. I think you walk against the west side of the castillo after main entrance.
    Kukulcan / Castillo you CANT climb it no more. Think for about 1 or 2 years the closed it for public. Think to many people died.
    Bus 10.35 was late and there is not much shadow were we needed to wait.
    also "collectivo's"ask if you want to go with them.
    some sites with info

    http://www.yucatantoday.com/destinations/eng-chichen-itza.php
    http://www.tourbymexico.com/yucatan/chichen/chichmap.jpg

    open 8.00-16.30 (times on the ticket)
    entrance 98 pesos including the light show that i didnot see think at 19.00 winter or 20.00 summer
    parking 10 pesos

    More pictures at Chichén Itzá page

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    • Archeology
    • Theater Travel
    • Architecture

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  • poortrekkers's Profile Photo

    Lots to do in Lil' Valladolid

    by poortrekkers Written Apr 28, 2008
    Church on the square
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    I read very little in the tour books about Valladolid, except that it was an important site in the Caste War for Mayan independence (it did not end well for the Maya). Valladolid is a small, but interesting city. It is very walkable with a beautiful main square and many authentic restaurants. It is also a great home base for day trips. It is close to at least two large cenotes, the archological sits of Chichen-Itza and Ek Balam, as well as coastal estuaries of Rio Lagartos.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

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    Church of San Bernardino

    by dek516 Written Mar 22, 2008

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    San Bernardino
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    A 10-minute walk southwest of town takes you to the Church of San Bernardino and the Convent of Sisal. The church and convent date to the mid 16th century. From the high walls, it's clear that they served as a fortress as well as a church. We got there quite late and unfortunately didn't get to see the 16th century frescoes that have recently been uncovered in the church. The convent is also supposed to be very nice, but is hard to get into. Supposedly you can get in by asking at the church, or knocking on the convent door.

    Also worth noting is the very pretty street, Calle 41A, that you walk down to get to the convent and church. The street is lined with colorful houses and few cars go by, making for a very pleasant walk.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    The Cenotes

    by dek516 Updated Mar 22, 2008

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    Cenote Zaci

    If you go to Valladolid, you MUST leave time to visit one of the two cenotes outside of town-- Ditznup or Samula. There is also one in town, Zaci, that looks far less appealing. Cenotes are underground pools of water in which you can swim. Cenote Zaci is mostly open-air, whereas both Ditznup and Samula are truly underground, cave-like swimming areas with small bits of light peeking in from the rocks above. We went to Ditznup (it was a toss up between the two), and it was an amazing experience. We got there very early (because we had to leave Valladolid that morning) and had the cenote all to ourselves. The water was a dark blue and very deep, but not too cold. Stalactites reach down to the water and bats fly around the ceiling. There are also catfish swimming with you. It was one of the most bizarre but rewarding experiences I've had.

    To get to the cenotes, pick up a cab in front of Maria Guadalupe Hotel on Calle 44. Taxis run between 15 and 20 pesos per person each way; you may be able to talk the driver down a bit. Each cenote costs 25 pesos to get in. Although the guidebooks say that they open at 8am, we got there and were told they didn't actually open till 8:30, so be warned.

    I don't have a picture of Ditznup, unfortunately, because I didn't want to bring my camera while swimming. I do have a picture of the less impressive Zaci to give you a feel of what a cenote looks like, though.

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    Catedral de San Servasio

    by dek516 Written Mar 22, 2008

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    The church
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    The most prominent fixture on the main square in Valladolid is the Catedral de San Servasio, which is impressive both on the inside and out. Strangely, none of the guidebooks mention the church, so we had to do some investigating on our own. From what we learned at the tourist information center, the church was built in 1545 but was destroyed and then rebuilt in 1706. Inside, towards the back of the church, there are plaques commemorating the dead. Most of the plaques dated to the mid 19th to early 20th centuries-- they were interesting to figure out.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • dek516's Profile Photo

    The Main Square

    by dek516 Written Mar 22, 2008
    The main square
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    Valladolid's main square, called the Parque Francisco Canton Rosaldo, is a great place to sit and take in the scenery, possibly with an ice cream cone in hand :) The square is filled with trees and has nice benches encircling the fountain at the center of the square. During the day the fountain usually seems to be off, making the plastic-looking statue of a woman in the center look rather odd-- it looks better when the fountain is on at night. Just as in Merida, you can sit in or around the park and be entertained. We got to watch local children, dressed in traditional clothing, dance with bottles and trays balanced on their heads-- it was quite a show!

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    • Arts and Culture

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  • Jawnuta's Profile Photo

    VALLADOLID - cute little town

    by Jawnuta Written Jan 5, 2008

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    we passed this place and proceded on Calle 41
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    We arrived in Valladolid about 4.30.

    We drove straight to the town square, where we were shown a parking spot for us by a policewoman directing the hustling and bustling crowd of busses, cars, motorbikes and people.
    We paid couple of pesos to the Mayan 6 years old who insisted on watching our car for us. Why not.

    After taking care of our parking situation we proceed around the square to find nice place to eat.

    We were disappointed again.

    All restaurants made for tourists. All menus in four languages with the photos of dishes offered. All prices clearly for the "western wallet".

    We said good bye to the hustling and bustling square and proceeded on Calle 41, turned left on Calle 44 and found a nice guy serving shrimp ceviche from his street cart. There was also a lady right on the corner of Calle 41 &44 seling some kind of empanadas.

    We also went to gorgeous bakery on Calle 41 between 44 & 46.
    All the pastries were between 3.5 and 4.5 pesos, so we got a whole bag for about 40 pesos.
    (see our pictures)

    Anyway, there is a police presence on almost every corner of Valladolid for all of you that are afraid to wander around of the unknown towns.

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Valladolid Things to Do

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