Local traditions and culture in Mexico

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Most Viewed Local Customs in Mexico

  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    DAYS OF THE DEAD

    by alyf1961 Updated Feb 8, 2009

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    It is popular belief in Mexico that the dead have divine permission to visit friends and relatives on earth. once a year during the days of the dead the living offer food, candles and flowers to their loved ones that have died. This occasion is not morbid but a celebration of the passed ones lives. It is thought that the souls of children visit on November 1st and adults on November 2nd. Many shops sell skeletons dressed in clothes and performing everyday activities.

    DAYS OF THE DEAD

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    THE MAYANS

    by alyf1961 Written Feb 8, 2009

    The Mayan people are indigenous to parts of Mexico and Central America. They can be traced back as far as 2600 BC. The Mayans still live and work in parts of Mexico especially around Chichen Itsa, which was once a commercial, religious and military centre. The Mayans living around Chichen itsa sell local crafts on stalls within the ancient site, many wearing traditional dress.

    CHICHEN ITSA MAYANS DANCING A MAYAN STALL

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  • rkearns's Profile Photo

    many customs

    by rkearns Updated Oct 14, 2008

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    1. people go in the ocean with clothes on, and sit or lay in the sand as the water laps up over them.

    2. vendors and musicians often come onto local and regional buses to make money. some of the treats they sell are plantanes, juice sold in plastic bags, and a type of fried pig skin with a hot sauce.

    3. men (mostly men) will lift their shirts up over their bellies and stand on the street corner, for no apparent reason.

    4. the women don´t generally drink outdoors, but in closed quarters, like a restaurant or home.

    5. people throw their trash on the ground. PLEASE DON´T DO IT! mexico´s rivers and oceans are very polluted because of this.

    6. you will always be approached by vendors on the beach, especially in tourist destinations. some of these vendors are children and old women. it breaks my heart.

    7- some street food includes juices topped with peanuts, corn with hot salsa served in a cup, hot dogs wrapped in bacon, fruit, tacos, horchata, pastries and juices served in plastic bags.

    8. the "clean" standard is different than in the u.s.

    9. stray animals are abundant.

    This is actually a bathroom in an accommodation... trash on the beaches a good boy piled into the back of a truck notice the people in the water with clothes ON.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Symbol of the nation

    by TheWanderingCamel Written Oct 26, 2007

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    The Aztecs believed that the place where the gods were born , the very centre of the earth, would be revealed to them by the sighting of an eagle perched on a cactus and with a snake in its beak. Where the eagle was sighted became the centre of their civilization - their capital city, Tenochtitlan - now the the sprawling megalopolis of Mexico City.

    The snake-bearing eagle has become the country's coat of arms and takes pride of place as the centrepiece of the nation's flag whilst the colours are symbolic of hope (green), unity (white) and the blood of the heroes of the revolution (red).

    Mexico's flag Colours of the nation

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    Dance of the Viejecitos

    by madamx Written Jan 13, 2007

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    We got lucky and managed to see a performance of the Viejecitos (Little Old Men). This is a dance said to have been invented by the local Purepecha during the early colonial period to mock the Spanish colonists.

    The dancers were boys from about 6-12 years old, and they wore pink wrinkly masks, plus had on hard-soled wooden sandals, which they use to make a lot of noise stumbling around, as the names suggests, like clumsy old men.

    You can usually see performances of the Viejecitos at the major hotels, and on weekends at the Casa de los Once Patios, around noon.

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    Rebozos

    by madamx Updated Jan 13, 2007

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    Rebozos semed part of life in the Mexican countryside and it seemed most females wore one. They use it for warmth, to accessorize, and even to carry their babies on their backs as well. You can get rebozos ranging from very expensive at some of the craft shops, to inexpensive at the local markets.

    I bought mine at the local markets, I guess their version of the fake pashmina. They are much better quality and more distinctive than fake pashminas and just as cheap; plus they're great souveniers to buy for people back home.

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    Carry Small Bills

    by madamx Written Jan 5, 2007

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    When carrying pesos, make sure you have plenty of small bills. It seems that no one has change or if any, very little. It doesn't make sense, as they issue large bills, so someone must use them! And if everyone has small bills, someone must have change ... if I think about it too much, it drives me crazy, so trust me, carry lots of small bills and change.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Day of the Dead (El Dia De los Muertos)

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Nov 29, 2006

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    Although it looks like Halloween, it is not Halloween!

    During the Dia de los Muertos, which occurs every year on November 1 and 2, many Mexican families honor their ancestors and their dead with home altars and/or by visiting and spending time in the cementerio where their loved ones are buried. This was originally thought as to greet the spirits as they return to the home for 24 hours each year.

    There are different traditions within the large one itself so the way it is celebrated might change from region to region or even from family to family . But basically this day is very important to Mexicans and most people will take the 2 days to visit the graves of their loved ones. The more rural the place is is the more traditional the celebration is.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Zapatistas

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Sep 18, 2006

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    Mexico's modern-day Zapatista movement had its roots in the southern state of Chiapas Although they are mostly associated with Chiapas, the Zapatistas aim is to represent " the dispossessed millions" of the whole country against both the one-party system of the government and wealthy international interests who they see as having oppressed the the indigenous people for the last 500 years and virtually all the country's population for the last 70 years.

    Arguing that the land should belong to those who work it (and indigenous Mexicans own virtually no land at all) their aims include land reform, an end to illiteracy, dignity in the workplace and respect for indigenous peoples and cultures as well as the recognition and implimentation of many basic rights for all the population that currently, and sadly, are available to relatively few.

    In January this year (2006), the Zapatistas began a tour of all 31 states in Mexico - a six month long journey labelled La Otra Campana - The Other Campaign - the end of which will coincide with their arrival in Mexico City in time for the elections in June.

    The demostration we saw in Oaxaca was restrained and dignified - a silent protest that was all the more telling for the place in which it was staged - the ancient city of Monte Alban.

    Silent protest Zapatistas at Monte Alban
    Related to:
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  • pedroebc's Profile Photo

    www.guelaguetza.com.mx JULY IN OAXACA CITY

    by pedroebc Updated Aug 29, 2006

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    GUELAGUETZA DANCING FESTIVAL in OAXACA CITY... month july all years...

    the festival is celebrated each year in july, the dancers from different regions of oaxaca show their local customs and its a big parade in the city, with big puppets, colorful dresses, gifts to tourists, music alla round,...great spot to visit in Mexico.

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  • pedroebc's Profile Photo

    plus zapatour

    by pedroebc Updated May 24, 2006

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    Le sous commandant Marcos, qui a annoncé fin novembre la dissolution du Front zapatiste de libération nationale –bras civil et politique des guérilleros depuis une décennie– et son remplacement par un nouveau mouvement politique, a rappelé qu’en aucun cas les zapatistes ne participeraient au scrutin. La nouvelle organisation zapatiste, ainsi, “ne luttera pas pour le pouvoir mais cherchera à construire une nouvelle manière de faire de la politique.”
    Un pari risqué
    Aux partis institutionnels, d’ores et déjà lancés dans la course à la présidentielle, cette "autre campagne" pourrait bien réserver quelques surprises. L’émergence d’une extrême gauche contestataire, organisée et unie, pourrait ainsi compromettre les chances du candidat de gauche Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, bête noire des zapatistes, pourtant donné favori par les sondages.
    Mais pour Marcos aussi, le pari est risqué. Isolé dans son fief du Chiapas depuis la rupture des relations avec le gouvernement de Vicente Fox en 2003, affaibli par des désaffections et des querelles internes, le mouvement zapatiste se trouve aujourd’hui dans une position délicate. “Il est possible que nous perdions tout ce que nous avons si nous ne faisons rien de plus pour avancer”, a reconnu récemment le leader altermondialiste. Avant d’ajouter : “L’heure est venue de se risquer une autre fois à faire un pas dangereux.”

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  • pedroebc's Profile Photo

    EZLN, Marcos a le tour politique pour Mexique

    by pedroebc Updated May 24, 2006

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    Cinq ans après le "Zapatour", qui avait conduit un millier de militants zapatistes jusqu’au palais présidentiel de Mexico, le sous-commandant Marcos a entamé un nouveau périple, ce week-end, au Chiapas. Jusqu’à la fin du mois de juin, le leader zapatiste va sillonner le pays, afin de jouer les trouble-fêtes dans la campagne électorale pour la présidentielle

    C’est reparti pour un tour. Cinq ans après la marche zapatiste, qui avait conduit un millier d’indiens depuis la forêt du Chiapas jusqu’au palais présidentiel de Mexico, le sous commandant Marcos a entamé un nouveau périple, dimanche dernier, dans le sud du Mexique. Pendant six mois, le chef de file de l’Armée zapatiste de libération nationale (Ezln) va sillonner le pays afin d’ouvrir “une nouvelle phase dans la lutte zapatiste pour la démocratie, la liberté et la justice.”
    Le visage dissimulé sous son traditionnel passe-montagne, Marcos a quitté à moto son fief de la Garrucha, près de la frontière guatémaltèque, avec plusieurs compagnons de route. Pour la première étape de son périple, il s’est rendu à San Cristobal de las Casas, où il a rencontré des responsables d’ONG. Plusieurs milliers de militants et sympathisants de l’Ezln s’étaient réunis pour l’occasion, douze ans jour pour jour après le déclenchement du soulèvement zapatiste dans la forêt du Chiapas.
    Une campagne électorale alternative
    Jusqu’à la fin du mois de juin, cette "autre campagne" (d’après le surnom que lui ont donné les cadres de l’Ezln) conduira le leader zapatiste d’un bout à l’autre du Mexique, à la rencontre des communautés indigènes, et plus généralement des groupes de gauche non institutionnels. Objectif : les convaincre de se joindre à un grand front anticapitaliste, afin de jouer les trouble-fêtes dans la perspective de l’élection présidentielle de juillet 2006.
    Pas question, pour autant, d’abandonner la posture révolutionnaire chère aux zapatistes.

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    Guadalajara is very nice , and...

    by pedroebc Updated May 24, 2006

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    Guadalajara is very nice , and the beatty of theur women there is amazing, you can see top models walking in smalll towns in the ALTOS DE JALISCO and they are selling the bread,tortillas, etc.
    AGAVE plantations is a nice landscape.

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  • pedroebc's Profile Photo

    VIRGEN DE GUADALUPE

    by pedroebc Updated May 24, 2006

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    La Virgen de Guadalupe: ¿símbolo de México?

    “El día en que no se adore a la Virgen del Tepeyac en esta tierra, es seguro que habrá desaparecido, no sólo la nacionalidad mexicana, sino hasta el recuerdo de los moradores del México actual”, .

    Los mexicanos son guadalupanos por la cultura en la que fueron educados, y para muchos tiene un significado de Símbolo nacional, Confidente y Autoridad. “Nada recuerda tanto a la Patria lejana en el extranjero, dicen los viajeros mexicanos, como la imagen de la Virgen de Guadalupe”, .

    En los orígenes de nuestro México hay una conquista, dos pueblos en guerra, lucha, muerte, resentimiento, dominio y esclavitud. “En 1531 aparece la Virgen de Guadalupe, con una imagen que integra dos culturas distintas, la cultura española e indigena.

    es un imagen que dice mucho a los indígenas, toma su cultura porque aparecerá con aquellos símbolos de las deidades indígenas, aquello que era importante, para el indígena, el color en su vestimenta que era el color que utilizaban los principales, aparecerá el sol la luna y las estrellas, pero ella esta sobre la luna, se viste de las estrellas, el sol esta atrás, es más que sus deidades, y les esta hablando en su propio lenguaje”

    “La aparición de la Virgen Vino a unir nuestra Patria, unir a 2 razas. Vencedores y vencidos se tomaron de la mano.


    convencido de que si no hubiera existido la Virgen de Guadalupe, México hubiera sido muy distinto de lo que es ahora.

    símbolo representativo de la identidad de un pueblo determinado”.

    La Guadalupana no está sola en la imagen

    Impacta mucho ver tantas cosas inexplicables en el ayate.

    ¿Quiénes aparecen en los ojos? “un indígena que esta sentado casi desnudo… un hombre bastante anciano, demacrado, que por comparación con pinturas parece ser el Obispo Zumárraga, junto a él hay un joven, posiblemente el traductor del obispo, después esta propiamente Juan Diego, que se le podría reconocer porque está desplegando una capa o tilma… aparece una mujer de raza negra”, comentó el Dr. Aste.

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  • PolishChick's Profile Photo

    La fiesta de la Virgen de Guadalupe.....

    by PolishChick Updated May 21, 2006

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    Mexico, as every very catholic country, has its own Virgin- La Virgen de Guadalupe. Her day is celebrated the 12th of Decembr because on that day the Virgin appeared to an indian man, Juan Diego, telling him to build a church, which is now in el Cerro del Tepeyac. On this day kids dress like the indian people of the times of Juan Diego, and they go with their parents to churches where special masses are celebrated and where they have their photos taken with the image of the Virgin.

    A mass outside ina small mountain town of Chocaman

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