Bessemer Travel Guide

  • Bessemer
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Bessemer
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Bessemer
    by butterflykizzez04

Bessemer Things to Do

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 16, 2014

    Tony and I found this home when we were Urban Hiking in Bessemer Alabama right outside of Birmingham. The home is victorian and gorgeous and located across the street from the Abandoned Arlington School building.
    This house was built in 1906 by architect William E. Benns for H. W. Sweet at a cost of $10,000. The house uniquely blended the Queen Anne and Neo-Classical architectural styles, featuring two identical pedimented entrance porticos supported by fluted Composite-order columns, full-length wrap around porches on the first and second stories, and an octagonal corner tower. H. W. Sweet (1866-1919) a native of South Carolina, was Bessemer's first undertaker and a furniture merchant. Henry W. Sweet (1902-1990) was his and Mattie Breen Sweet's (1865-1946) only child. Henry married Lucile Lytle (1902-1986) in 1925
    Henry Wilson Sweet (1902-1990) contributed greatly to the economic, political and civic life of Alabama, Jefferson County, and Bessemer. As Jefferson County Commissioner, he helped bring the University of Alabama Medical Center to Birmingham, signing the deed conveying land and the Hillman - Jefferson Hospital Complex to UAB. Sweet was Director of the Alabama and Georgia State Docks and a candidate for Governor in 1954. While he was Alabama Docks Director, Mobile achieved its highest ever U.S. ports ranking. He also served as Treasurer of the Bessemer Division of Jefferson County, President of the American Association of Ports Authorities, and an International Director of Lions Clubs.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 16, 2014

    On Saturday, March 8th on our way to Birmingham, we stopped in Bessemer, Alabama and I found this old Dept that is on the National Historical Register for Buildings. It is now the Hall of History Museum. It was closed but I did walk around the building and took pictures. Also across the street was some old building from the same time frame still in good condition. If you are in the area, you should check it out. I am going to learn more about this building.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Trains
    • Architecture

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    by kjinright Written Aug 24, 2002

    VisionLand Family Amusement Park,
    Steel Waters Family Water Park,
    Tannehill Historical State Park,
    Bright Star Family Restaurant (since 1902),
    Mercedes-Benz Assembly (Vance, AL),
    University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, AL)

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Bessemer Hotels

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Bessemer Off The Beaten Path

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    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 16, 2014

    The Arlington School was the first high school for the city of Bessemer. The 3-story brick and limestone Classical revival-style was constructed in 1908. It was later converted into an elementary school before it closed in 1986.
    The school features a jewel-box theater with a raked floor and horseshoe balcony. The basketball gym is lit by skylights.
    The vacant building was listed as one of the Alabama Historical Commission's "Places in Peril" for 2003.
    Various groups have proposed an adaptive re-use for the structure, including the Rainbow Community Development Corporation which was working with Sloss Real Estate to attempt to redevelop the building in 2004. That plan never came to fruition and Sloss returned its conditional title to the board. More recently B3 (Bring Bessemer Back) has submitted a $1.8 million redevelopment plan to the board which would convert the school into offices for non-profit groups and re-use the auditorium for community functions.
    On January 15, 2008 the Bessemer School Board declared the school building to be "surplus", opening the door for it to be sold. In August 2008 inspectors for the City of Bessemer deemed the structure unsafe, meaning that the board must bring it up to current code before it can be sold or reused. In October 2012 the Board began asking for bids to demolish the building.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

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