Fun things to do in Birmingham

  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Viewed Things to Do in Birmingham

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Alabama Theater in Birmingham

    by butterflykizzez04 Updated Mar 16, 2014

    Saturday, March 8th, Tony and I was urban hiking in Birmingham and when I rounded the corner and saw the "ALABAMA THEATER" and the marque all lite up..I was so excited...almost giddy...my husband calls it ARCHITECTURE ORGASM...I just call it PURE EXCITEMENT...a rush from the past...a charge to my memory of good and happy thoughts...okay ORGASM...lol !!!

    I love to tour old buildings and OMG this one was OPEN!!!! They were having some sort of Talent show auditions and people were everywhere, practicing in the lobby, the hallways and bathroom..I went from Basement to 5th floor...climbing the red carpeted steps in "PURE AWE" of the gold, red and art deco glitz of the Fabulous 20's...
    Tony felt we were trespassing so he went outside to the sidewalk to smoke..MISSING the beauty of the building from top to bottom..besides if I was trespassing it would be good to have someone on the outside to Bail me out!!! ((( LOL)))

    I found a very nice lady with a badge on showing she was security. I told her I was only interested in the theater and the beauty of the building and asked if I could meander through the halls and take pictures..she said..."WHY YES of course...ENJOY"...and enjoy I did...
    Around every corner and up every step..another step back into time...
    I am in love !!!
    This has to be the MOST BEAUTIFUL example of GOLDEN GLITZ of the ART DECO age..every light fixture, every panel in the ceiling, every red velvet layer of material on the walls, flooring and seats...PERFECT NIRVANA...
    If you are in the area and get to enjoy the grandeur of this theater..YOU MUST!!!!
    The Alabama Theatre is a movie palace in Birmingham, Alabama. It was built in 1927 by Paramount's Publix Theatre chain as its flagship theater for the southeastern region of the United States. Seating 2,500 people at the time, it was the largest in the Birmingham Theatre district. The district was once home to a myriad of large theaters that featured vaudeville, performing arts, nickelodeons, and large first-run movie palaces. The Alabama is the only district theater still operating today. Built to show silent films, the Alabama still features its original Wurlitzer theater organ. Other than the Alabama, the Lyric Theatre is the only theater still standing in the district.
    The Alabama and its historic organ were added to the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage on February 15, 1977 and to the National Register of Historic Places on November 13, 1979. The theater has been surveyed by the Historic American Buildings Survey on several occasions, the last time being in 1996.
    HISTORY:
    Construction plans for the Alabama were announced in 1926, but ground breaking was delayed until April 1, 1927. The grand opening was held as originally scheduled on December 26, 1927. Construction of the concrete and steel building cost approximately $1.5 million
    In 1934, the Loveman's of Alabama department store next door burned to the ground. Thanks to a thick firewall on that side of the Alabama, the theater was unharmed aside from some smoke damage around air vents in the auditorium. These smoke stains would remain until the 1998 theater restoration.[4]
    One of the things the Alabama Theatre was known for in its early days was its Mickey Mouse Club, which was formed in 1933. Meetings were held every Saturday, where the children would perform for each other, watch Mickey Mouse cartoons, and participate in other activities. The Club also sponsored food and toy drives for the underprivileged. By 1935, the Club had over 7000 members, making it the biggest Mickey Mouse Club in the world. Membership eventually peaked at over 18,000 before the Club closed almost ten years after it was formed.[4]
    Another regular event at the Alabama Theatre was the Miss Alabama Pageant. From 1935 to 1948, the rules of the Miss America Pageant allowed multiple contestants per state. The Alabama Theater hosted the Miss Birmingham Pageant in those years. When the rules were changed in 1949, the Alabama Theatre became host to the Miss Alabama Pageant and continued to do so through 1966.
    The decline of downtown Birmingham through the 1960s and 1970s saw the closing of most of the downtown's movie theatres. In 1981, Plitt Theatres of Chicago closed the Alabama and sold it to Cobb Theaters of Birmingham. Cobb attempted to reopen the Alabama several times, but was unsuccessful. Cobb eventually sold the Alabama to Costa and Head, developers working to revitalize the downtown area. Costa and Head initiated series of classic movies at the Alabama with some success, but ultimately filed for bankruptcy in 1986
    The Alabama Chapter of the American Theatre Organ Society (ATOS) had been maintaining the Alabama's organ starting in the 1970s. They sought permission to remove the organ from the Alabama to save it, but Costa and Head's creditors deemed it the single most valuable item in the building and forbade its removal. In response the Alabama Chapter of ATOS began a fund-raising effort to buy the Alabama. It was purchased by Birmingham Landmarks, Inc. in 1987. The non-profit organization was originally started with the sole purpose of saving the theater. With the purchase, the theater was renamed the Alabama Theatre for the Performing Arts.[4] In 1993, the Alabama was designated the official state historic theater of Alabama.[5]
    In 1998, the Alabama Theatre underwent a complete restoration, in which gold leaf and other paint was cleaned or replaced, seats were replaced or recovered, and some carpet and drapes were replaced. Birmingham Landmarks continues to own the theater and has also purchased the Lyric Theatre, a 1914 vaudeville theater located across the street from the Alabama.[4] The Alabama hosts roughly 250 entertainment events every year. It attracts more than 400,000 people a year to a variety of performances, including Broadway-type theatre, ballet, opera, music concerts, and film
    ORGAN:
    When the Alabama was built in 1927, films were silent and required a musical accompaniment. This was typically provided by an orchestra or theater pipe organ. The Alabama's organ is a Crawford Special-Publix One Mighty Wurlitzer. Only 25 of this model of organ were built and the Alabama's is one of only three still installed in their original sites.[4]
    Nicknamed Big Bertha, the Alabama's organ is a four-manual (keyboard) organ. It was originally installed with 20 ranks (sets of pipes), but has been expanded to 32. It also features numerous percussion instruments and sound effects to accompany silent movies.

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Statue of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 16, 2014

    Saturday, March 8th, Tony and I was enjoying our Urban hiking in Birmingham. We arrived a little too late to go inside the Civil Rights Institute but we were able to stroll through the Kelly Ingram Park across the street and the 16th Street Baptist Church..and we also found this wonderful statue of Rev Shuttlesworth located just as you enter the Civil Rights Museum..A must when you are in Birmingham

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Kelly Ingram Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 16, 2014

    Saturday, March 8th, Tony and I was urban hiking in Birmingham and we visited Kelly Ingram Park across the street from the Civil Rights Institute and 16th Street Baptist Church. Formerly West Park and home to so much violence during the Civil Rights movement and so full of HISTORY..a must visit when you are in Birmingham Alabama..so much INJUSTICE IN THE WORLD...Kelly Ingram Park, formerly West Park,[2] is a four acre (16,000 m²) park located in Birmingham, Alabama. It is bounded by 16th and 17th Streets and 5th and 6th Avenues North in the Birmingham Civil Rights District. The park, just outside the doors of the 16th Street Baptist Church, served as a central staging ground for large-scale demonstrations during the American Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.
    Reverends Martin Luther King, Jr., James Bevel, and Fred Shuttlesworth of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference directed the organized boycotts and protests of 1963 which centered on Kelly Ingram Park.[3] It was here, during the first week of May 1963, that Birmingham police and firemen, under orders from Public Safety Commissioner Eugene "Bull" Connor, confronted demonstrators, many of them children and high school students, first with mass arrests and then with police dogs and firehoses. Images from those confrontations, broadcast nationwide, spurred a public outcry which turned the nation's attention to the struggle for racial equality. The demonstrations in Birmingham brought city leaders to agree to an end of public segregation and helped to ensure the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    The park was named in 1932 for local firefighter Osmond Kelly Ingram, who was the first sailor in the United States Navy to be killed in World War I. In 1992 it was completely renovated and rededicated as "A Place of Revolution and Reconciliation" to coincide with the opening of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, an interpretive museum and research center, which adjoins the park to the west.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Statue of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 16, 2014

    Saturday March 8th, while Urban Hiking in Birmingham with Tony. We found the statue of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. located in the Kelly Ingram park, which is located across the street from the Civil Rights Institute and 16th Street Baptist Church..Very nice statue..

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Steiner Building in Birmingham

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 14, 2014

    he Steiner Building is a four-story office building located at 2101 1st Avenue North at the foot of the Rainbow Viaduct, on the southeast corner of the intersection with 21st Street North. The red brick building, constructed in 1890 in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, was designed by architects Charles and Harry Wheelock for the Steiner Brothers Bank, owned by Sigfried and Burghard Steiner.
    The building was constructed on the 25' x 100' site of the William Nabors residence, considered to be the first house built within the original limits of Birmingham. The bank paid $21,760 for the property.
    The front corner of the narrow building is expressed as a tower capped with a pediment and thick corner piers. The ground floor entrance lobby is marked by large sandstone arches, set into a boldly-rusticated base level. The triple openings above are extended across two floors with a spandrel in between, while the upper floor is divided into four arched openings, separated by round colonnets. The name "STEINER BUILDING" in raised block letters stretches across the front facade, just below the cornice. The building boasted the first hydraulically operated elevator in the state.
    he Steiner Brothers Bank relocated to 3rd Avenue North in 1963. After they moved out the building was mostly vacant, at one point housing the offices of the Jefferson County Historical Society. The Steiner Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 25, 1974.
    In 1979 it was purchased from John and Stanley Wilson III by Steiner Landmark Ltd. (SLM LLC), a partnership of Hubert Goings of Engel Real Estate, the investment firm of Porter White & Company, and the architecture firm of Kidd, Wheeler & Plosser. Birmingham's Historical Preservation Authority assisted with financing the building's restoration, partly through a federal Urban Development Action Grant. A warehouse building immediately behind the Steiner Building, facing Morris Avenue was also redeveloped and sold to an accounting firm.
    Kidd, Wheeler and Plosser, now known as KPS Group designed an addition to the east side of the building, nearly doubling its interior space. The addition, which uses similar colors and composition, stands as a modest complement to the original structure. Slaughter Hanson, an advertising agency, also had space in the building until they relocated to Vestavia Hills in 1999.

    1901 photo of Steiner Building
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Caldwell-Milner Building and McAdory Building

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 14, 2014

    Caldwell-Milner Building (Left) and McAdory Building (Right) Birmingham, Al.)--Both on NRHP

    Built 1887
    At one time also known as Billiard Plaza for Guys and Dolls
    Now used as Lawyers Offices
    McAdory Building Placed on NRHP in 1979---No. 79000388
    Caldwell-Milner Building Placed on NRHP 1979-No. 79000387

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Birmingham Civil Rights Institute

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 14, 2014

    Birmingham Civil Rights Institute is a large interpretive museum and research center in Birmingham, Alabama that depicts the struggles of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s. The Institute is located in the Civil Rights District, which includes the historic 16th Street Baptist Church, Kelly Ingram Park, Fourth Avenue Business District, and the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame located in the Carver Theatre. The Institute opened in November 1992, and had more than 25,000 visitors during its first week.
    The Institute showcases a walking journey through the "living institution", which displays the lessons of the past as a positive way to chart new directions for the future. The permanent exhibitions are a self-directed journey through Birmingham's contributions to the Civil Rights Movement and human rights struggles. Multimedia exhibitions focus on the history of African-American life and the struggle for civil rights. The Oral History Project, one of the museum's multimedia exhibits, documents Birmingham's role in the Civil Rights Movement through the voices of movement participants. The museum is an affiliate in the Smithsonian Affiliations program. Through this program the museum can acquire long-term loans and is currently hosting the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service exhibition "Let Your Motto Be resistance."[1]
    The archives of the Institute serve as a national resource for educators and researchers. They are a repository for the collection and preservation of civil rights documents and artifacts. The archival information system is computer-linked to the Birmingham Public Library and is a vital component of the Archives Division.
    The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute is also a community resource for meetings, seminars and workshops. A Community Meeting Room is available to local organizations.
    The museum is a member of the North American Reciprocal Museums program.
    On May 24th, 2013, President Barack Obama signed into law H.R. 360 from the 113th United States Congress, a bill which awarded the Congressional Gold Medal to Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley to commemorate the lives they lost 50 years ago in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church.[2] The gold medal was given to the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute to display or loan out to other museums

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Heaviest Corner on the Earth

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 14, 2014

    Saturday, march 8th, Tony and I was strolling around downtown Birmingham, AL and we found the "Heaviest Corner on Earth". At the corner, 20th Street and 1st Avenue North, look around and you will see four buildings that were finished within a few years of each other: the Woodward Building (1902), Brown Marx Building (1906), Empire Building (1909) and the American Trust and Savings Bank Building (1912). At the time, the height and mass of the buildings were so impressive that the intersection of 1st Avenue North and 20th Street was proclaimed the "Heaviest Corner on Earth."

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    First Presbyterian Church ... Birmingham

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 13, 2014

    Saturday, March 8th, Tony and enjoyed looking at all the gorgeous Architecture in Birmingham. With Gorgeous churches and buildings..I walked around in awe and amazement
    I can't wait to go back to Birmingham again!!!

    Since 1872, the First Presbyterian Church is a place of worship for individuals of the Christian faith. Located in Birmingham, Ala., the church performs various prayer and worship services every Sunday. Additionally, it offers Church School for individuals of all ages on Sunday mornings. Apart from these, the First Presbyterian Church operates various ministries related to faith formation, congregational care, stewardship, service as well as worship, music and art. It has also organized the youth, Sunday lunch and, coffee and fellowship groups.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Episcopal Cathedral of the Advent Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 13, 2014

    On Saturday, March 8th, Tony and I was walking around enjoying the lovely day..the weather was awesome. We were enjoying the churches and buildings and looking for a park that I wanted to see and I found this amazing church. I just fell in love with it. It is very large and takes up an entire city block. I loved this church..
    History I found out about it on the internet:
    he Cathedral Church of the Advent in Birmingham, Alabama, is the mother church of the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama. On March 30, 1983, the structure was added to the National Register of Historic Places as the Episcopal Church of the Advent
    The parish church of the Advent was established in 1872, one year after the founding of the city of Birmingham, and was one of the first churches built in the new city. The first building on this site was completed in 1873, but was soon destroyed by fire. The current structure, was occupied in 1883 with the tower and portico undergoing construction until 1885. The Cathedral is known for its historical location on Twentieth Street near Linn Park, as well as for the reputation of its music program. It was not until 1982, that the Church of the Advent became a cathedral, when the Diocese of Alabama selected the church as its seat
    The congregation undertook a major project to preserve the sandstone exterior of the Cathedral between 1999 and 2005. During this same period the Rector's Garden was redesigned to improve drainage and accommodate a columbarium and the belltower was refitted for a carillon of fifteen bells, cast by Fonderie Paccard of Lac d'Annecy, France. In both 2005 and 2012, readers of the Birmingham News named the cathedral choir "Best Church Choir". Today, the Church of the Advent comprises nearly 4000 members, making it one of the ten largest Episcopal churches in the United States.[2] The current Dean of the Cathedral is the Very Reverend Andrew C. Pearson, Jr.The Cathedral campus is also home to the Advent Episcopal Day Schoo

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    16th Street Baptist Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 13, 2014

    Sixteenth Street Baptist Church is a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama which is frequented predominately by African Americans. In September 1963, it was the target of the racially motivated 16th Street Baptist Church bombing that killed four girls in the midst of the American Civil Rights Movement. The church is still in operation and is a central landmark in the Birmingham Civil Rights District. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 2006
    The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church was organized as the First Colored Baptist Church of Birmingham in 1873. It was the first black church to organize in Birmingham, which was founded just two years before (1305). The first meetings were held in a small building at 12th Street and Fourth Avenue North. A site was soon acquired on 3rd Avenue North between 19th and 20th Street for a dedicated building. In 1880, the church sold that property and built a new church on the present site on 16th Street and 6th Avenue North. The new brick building was completed in 1884, but in 1908 the city condemned the structure and ordered it to be demolished.
    The present building, a "modified Romanesque and Byzantine design" by the prominent black architect Wallace Rayfield, was constructed in 1911 by the local black contractor T.C. Windham. The cost of construction was $26,000. In addition to the main sanctuary, the building houses a basement auditorium, used for meetings and lectures, and several ancillary rooms used for Sunday school and smaller groups.
    As one of the primary institutions in the black community, Sixteenth Street Baptist has hosted prominent visitors throughout its history. W. E. B. Du Bois, Mary McLeod Bethune, Paul Robeson and Ralph Bunche all spoke at the church during the first part of the 20th century.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Lyric Theater

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 12, 2014

    Built in 1914 the Lyric featured entertainers from across the U.S. such as Buster Keaton, Will Rodgers, the Marx Brothers and Mae West. After its closing in 1958 and years of neglect, the building was acquired in 1991 by Birmingham Landmarks, Inc. Currently, the Lyric Theatre sits as an empty and forgotten structure with much potential for downtown Birmingham. Plans for the Lyric include a large fundraising campaign beginning in 2009 for the.

    Old stage
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    five points

    by doug48 Updated Feb 15, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the five points and highlands areas are the nicest parts of downtown birmingham. five points is birmingham's entertainment district and is an area that has a number of good restaurants and bars. five points is the safest area in the city of birmingham for nightlife.

    five points
    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As we drove towards Birmingham on I-20, I saw that we were approaching the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum. That hadn't been in my plans at all, but since the railroad museum was closed at this time of year, we stopped.

    This turned out to be a fantastic museum which mostly concentrated on motorcycles, although they did have some race cars and a powder blue 1958 Chevrolet plus some ship and car models.

    George Barber (whose museum this is) raced, modified, and maintained Porsches in the 1960's. His interest soon turned to motorcycles.

    "He wanted to preserve motorcycle history in the United States in a way that represents an international aspect and to supply an example of motorcycles that until then could only have been seen in books and magazines."

    There are 750 vintage and modern motorcycles displayed on walls, two-tiered platforms and just about everywhere you look. The bikes are displayed randomly, rather than by date and year,

    Restorations are done in-house. The original museum opened in March 14, 1995. It moved to the new location at The Barber Motorsports Park on September 19, 2003.

    "The collection now has over 900 vintage and modern motorcycles... There are approximately five hundred motorcycles on display at any given time. (There are over 900 in the collection.) These bikes range from 1904 to current-year production. There are bikes from 16 countries that represent 143 different marques. "

    There is also a race track associated with the museum. We arrived at 11:30 and were there for a hour.

    Admission

    Admission rates are $10 for Adults,
    $6.00 for Children ages 4-12, and
    FREE for Children 3 and under.

    3 day Weekend Pass
    $ 15.00 for Friday, Saturday and Sunday
    (can only be used on consecutive days)

    Hours of operation

    April 1 - September 30
    Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm
    Sunday Noon - 6pm

    October 1 - March 31
    Monday - Saturday 10am - 5pm
    Sunday Noon - 5pm

    Closed Easter Sunday and July 4th.

    From the elevator Motorcycles displayed from above. One motorcycle Motorcycles stacked by the elevator Motorscooters
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Motorcycle
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Sloss Furnaces

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We went in search of the Sloss Furnaces which, since it is a National Historic Landmark, I thought I might be able to get a passport stamp for it.

    It soon appeared next to the limited access highway, so we got off and went around to the other side - no access here either - now it was on the other side of some railroad tracks. Eventually we found our way in, but the visitor's center was closed and locked. It is only open for guided tours on weekends, but I did not realize that meant that it wasn't open at all during the week.

    Anyway there were some informational signs and we walked around the place for about half an hour. I think we could have climbed up on some of the catwalks, but we didn't.

    The website says: "On April 18, 1882, Sloss Furnaces began producing iron and did not stop until ninety years later. Over the decades, Sloss Furnaces gave rise to the city of Birmingham ...

    .. James Withers Sloss built the furnaces which became known as the "City Furnaces." Extensively rebuilt and modernized in the late 1920s, the current steel-jacketed furnaces employed an estimated 500 workers and produced 400 tons of pig iron daily. Sloss-Sheffield Steel and Iron Company and U. S. Pipe operated these furnaces, maintaining their position as a leading foundry iron producer until 1971.

    Hours of Operation: Tuesday through Saturday 10am to 4pm; Sunday 12 to 4pm; Closed Mondays

    Admission: Free!

    Sloss Furnaces sign
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Birmingham Hotels

Latest Birmingham Hotel Reviews

Hyatt Place Birmingham/Downtown
196 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 16, 2014
Hampton Inn Birmingham I-65/Lakeshore Drive, Al
131 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 13, 2014
Fairfield Inn By Marriott Inverness
50 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 13, 2014
Mountain Brook
69 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 17, 2014
Suburban Lodge of Inverness Greystone
2 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2013
Courtyard By Marriott South Colonnade
83 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 18, 2014
Residence Inn By Marriott Birmingham Inverness
55 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: May 31, 2014
Redmont Hotel Birmingham
132 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 9, 2014
Holiday Inn Express Birmingham/Mountainbrook
64 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Dec 28, 2013
InTown Suites Oxmoor Birmingham
2 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: May 20, 2014
Sheraton Birmingham
601 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 20, 2014
The Tutwiler Burmingham
197 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 18, 2014
Hampton Inn Colonnade Birmingham
160 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 9, 2014
Hyatt Place Birmingham Inverness
154 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 14, 2014

Instant Answers: Birmingham

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

103 travelers online now

Comments

Birmingham Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Birmingham locals.
Map of Birmingham
Other Things to Do in Birmingham