Fort Payne Things to Do

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    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Recent Things to Do in Fort Payne

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    Grace's High Falls Overlook

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 7, 2014
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    Grace's High Falls Overlook visited by us on March 2, 2014. It is so lovely here. Considered the Grand Canyon of the East, Little River Canyon Rim Scenic Drive outside Fort Payne, AL..Here's a close-up picture of Graces High Falls. This 'high' waterfall plunges past river-carved sandstone.

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    Crow Point Overlook

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 7, 2014
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    Sunday, March 2nd Tony and I was enjoying this scenic drive with many overlooks and I had to stop at everyone...
    For most visitors, the best way to explore Alabama's spectacular Little Rive Canyon
    National Preserve is by the paved scenic road that leads along the western rim of the canyon.
    Canyon Rim Drive (Alabama Highway 176) connects eight overlooks along an 11 mile stretch of Little River Canyon. They provide outstanding vistas of the canyon and its natural features, as well as picnic areas, restroom facilities and interpretive displays on the natural history of the park.
    The drive begins near Little River Falls where Alabama Highway 35 from Fort Payne
    crosses the Little River. After entering the national preserve, just watch for Highway 176 leading to your right.
    Little River CanyonCalled the "Grand Canyon of the East," the canyon is more
    than 11 miles long and up to 700 feet deep

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    Canyon View Overlook

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 7, 2014
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    Sunday, March 2nd Tony and I was enjoying this scenic drive with many overlooks and I had to stop at everyone...
    For most visitors, the best way to explore Alabama's spectacular Little Rive Canyon
    National Preserve is by the paved scenic road that leads along the western rim of the canyon.
    Canyon Rim Drive (Alabama Highway 176) connects eight overlooks along an 11 mile stretch of Little River Canyon. They provide outstanding vistas of the canyon and its natural features, as well as picnic areas, restroom facilities and interpretive displays on the natural history of the park.
    The drive begins near Little River Falls where Alabama Highway 35 from Fort Payne
    crosses the Little River. After entering the national preserve, just watch for Highway 176 leading to your right.
    Little River CanyonCalled the "Grand Canyon of the East," the canyon is more
    than 11 miles long and up to 700 feet deep

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    Wolf Creek Overlook on the LIttle River Canyon Rim

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 7, 2014
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    Sunday, March 2nd Tony and I was enjoying this scenic drive with many overlooks and I had to stop at everyone...
    For most visitors, the best way to explore Alabama's spectacular Little Rive Canyon
    National Preserve is by the paved scenic road that leads along the western rim of the canyon.
    Canyon Rim Drive (Alabama Highway 176) connects eight overlooks along an 11 mile stretch of Little River Canyon. They provide outstanding vistas of the canyon and its natural features, as well as picnic areas, restroom facilities and interpretive displays on the natural history of the park.
    The drive begins near Little River Falls where Alabama Highway 35 from Fort Payne
    crosses the Little River. After entering the national preserve, just watch for Highway 176 leading to your right.
    Little River CanyonCalled the "Grand Canyon of the East," the canyon is more
    than 11 miles long and up to 700 feet deep

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    Mushroom Rock in Little River Canyon

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 6, 2014
    Mushroom Rock
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    Today, Sunday March 2nd, Tony and I decided to drive down the Little River Canyon Rim Scenic Drive and found various overlooks that had the most magnificent views..They were so amazing. Mushroom Rock - Not actually an overlook, Mushroom Rock is an unusual natural formation that rises literally in the middle of Canyon Rim Drive. The roadway divides to pass around it. A number of other unusual rock formations can be seen in the immediate area.

    Mushroom Rock is a rock formation found in the middle of Highway 176. The rock is shaped like a giant mushroom. It has also been known as Needle Eye Rock due to the slot in its base.

    The story is that several decades ago, a road crew constructing the original scenic drive is credited with saving this canyon landmark. Plans called for the rock formation we now call Mushroom Rock to be removed. Construction staff refused to blast it away. The crew built the road around it instead. Thanks to the determination of the crew to leave the formation intact, we now have Mushroom Rock in the national preserve.
    Across from Mushroom Rock is a series of rock outcrops. This is a great place for novice climbers or children to get their first taste of rock climbing.

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    Hawk Glide Overlook

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 6, 2014

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    Today, Sunday March 2nd, Tony and I decided to drive down the Little River Canyon Rim Scenic Drive and found various overlooks that had the most magnificent views..They were so amazing. This particular overlook had the name "HAWK GLIDE"...now I did notice at several overlooks hawks gliding above us and sometimes at eye level. I really found this trip amazing.

    Hawks Glide - This overlook is noteworthy because visitors can often see hawks and other birds gliding over the canyon in the vicinity. For most visitors, the best way to explore Alabama's spectacular Little River Canyon National Preserve is by the paved scenic road that leads along the western rim of the canyon.

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    Little River Falls Overlook

    by butterflykizzez04 Updated Mar 6, 2014
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    Sunday March 2nd, Tony and I decided to take the Little River Canyon Rim Scenic Drive and the first overlook was "Little River Falls Overlook"
    There was a beautiful overlook, a nice boardwalk walkway out to the overlook. Free parking and picnic tables for great view. I would love to bring my daughter here to enjoy the gorgeous views.

    Little River Falls Overlook - Located high on
    the west rim of the canyon, this overlook is
    accessible to visitors of all abilities. A
    boardwalk leads from the parking area to the
    actual overlook, which provides a spectacular
    view of Little River Falls and the rapids below
    it.

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    Little River Canyon Rim Scenic Drive

    by butterflykizzez04 Updated Mar 6, 2014

    For most visitors, the best way to explore
    Alabama's spectacular Little River Canyon
    National Preserve is by the paved scenic
    road that leads along the western rim of the
    canyon.

    Canyon Rim Drive (Alabama Highway 176)
    connects eight overlooks along an 11 mile
    stretch of Little River Canyon. They provide
    outstanding vistas of the canyon and its
    natural features, as well as picnic areas,
    restroom facilities and interpretive displays
    on the natural history of the park.

    The drive begins near Little River Falls where
    Alabama Highway 35 from Fort Payne
    crosses the Little River. After entering the
    national preserve, just watch for Highway 176
    leading to your right.

    Little River Canyon
    Called the "Grand Canyon of
    the East," the canyon is more
    than 11 miles long and up to
    700 feet deep.

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    The Alabama Fan Club and Museum

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014
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    Home of the Country Music Group of the Century, this museum houses the group Alabama's many awards and achievements, collections from their youth and a souvenir and gift shop.

    The Alabama Band
    Alabama headquarters is located in Fort Payne, AL at 101 Glenn Boulevard SW near the intersection of State Hwy 35 & U.S. Hwy. 11 and less than a mile off I-59, Exit 218. Hours of operation are 8 am - 5 pm Wednesday through Saturday and noon - 5 pm Sunday. We're closed on Mondays and Tuesday and we're also closed for major holidays so please check before traveling long distances.

    We welcome you to come into the Fan Club Museum and gift shop, there is no charge to browse and we enjoy meeting our fans! The merchandise we offer changes with each time of the season and with each album release. Some of the merchandise includes: pencils, pens, photos, hatpins, T-shirts, caps, jackets and the list goes on.
    Alabama Headquarters is also home to the Alabama Museum, Alabama Warehouse, Alabama's Promotion & Production Offices and the Alabama Fan Club Membership offices.

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    W. B. Davis Hosiery Mill

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014
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    Fort Payne's population at the beginning of the new century was approximately 1700, as compared with over 3500 in 1890. Most of its citizens realized that the city's future prosperity would depend upon small industries and the surrounding agricultural area.

    The industry for which Fort Payne became best known first came in 1907. It was that year, October 16 at 6:30 a.m. that the doors to the Florence Knitting Company opened for business. It housed 30 machines that knitted the socks. The building they began operations in once housed a Hardware Manufacturing Company in the late 1800’s during the discovery days of coal and iron ore in the hills and ridges of DeKalb County. It would later, and to this day, become known as the W.B. Davis Hosiery Mill, when March 15, 1915, Davis decided to increased his 10% share and be the major company stockholder.

    The W.B. Davis and Son Hosiery Mill could probably be deemed the single most important manufacturing plant impacting the post 1890 boom economy of Fort Payne. It was the progenitor of an industry, which now makes Fort Payne the largest single location of hosiery manufacturing in America, and thus the title of "Sock Capital of the World".

    The mill was the largest industry in DeKalb County for many years, its payroll providing the principal cash flow for the area. Since boom days, DeKalb County had been dependent on agriculture, with cotton as the mainstay.

    Davis acquired the old industrial building in 1915. Built in 1889 by the Alabama Builders’ Hardware Manufacturing Company it was intended to produce an extensive line of all grades of builders’ hardware. But the business failed to materialize before the boom era ended.

    W.B. Davis was half owner of the United Hosiery Mills in Chattanooga during the first decade of the century. That mill was referred to as "Buster Brown Mill No. One," after the trade name of its products. The Fort Payne mill began operation in 1913 under the name Buster Brown Mill No. Two, with Davis’ brother-in-law, James H. Witherspoon in charge. Davis later traded his stock in the Chattanooga mill for complete ownership of the one in Fort Payne. Coming to this city on January 1, 1915, he changed the name of the mill to the Davis name and began operating it with his son Robert E. Davis.

    During World War II, the Davis mill played an important role in supplying socks for the military. Robert E. Davis perfected the cushion sole sock, and during the war produced and delivered over eight million pairs to the army alone.

    During the peak of operation, W.B. Davis employed approximately 1,100 people. They were paid from $.10 to $.17 per hour in the early days. Although a dime an hour seems extremely low at this time, there were no other industrial jobs in Fort Payne and men working on farms were paid as little as 50 cents a day. Money was so scarce that employment at the mill was often considered a great opportunity.

    Today the hosiery industry has countless machines operating in over 100 plants around the county.

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    Wills Town Mission

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014

    Inscription. The mission was established in 1823 by the American Board of Missions to further education and Christianity among the Cherokee Indians. Mission operated until the Indian removal in 1838.

    Grave site of Reverend Ard Hoyt, first superintendent, marks the location of the mission near the corner of 38th Street and Godfrey Avenue.

    Erected 1983 by Alabama Historical Association.

    Location. 34° 26.615′ N, 85° 43.199′ W. Marker is in Fort Payne, Alabama, in DeKalb County. Marker is on Gault Avenue North (U.S. 11) east of 4th Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located in Union Park near the water fountain. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Payne AL 35968, United States of America.

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    Fort Payne's Fort

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014

    Inscription. The fort, consisting of a log house and large stockade, was built in 1838 by order of General Winfield Scott, commander of military forces responsible for the removal of Cherokee Indians.

    Soldiers occupying the fort were commanded by Captain John C. Payne, for whom the fort was named.

    Indians in the DeKalb County area who refused to move westward voluntarily were gathered and held in the stockade pending their forceful removal to the Indian territory.

    Chimney still standing on site of fort near the railroad at 4th Street S. E.

    Erected 1983 by Alabama Historical Association.

    Location. 34° 26.615′ N, 85° 43.199′ W. Marker is in Fort Payne, Alabama, in DeKalb County. Marker is on Gault Avenue North (U.S. 11) east of 4th Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located in Union Park near the water fountain. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Payne AL 35968, United States of America.

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    Historic DeKalb Theater

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014
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    The DeKalb Theatre was listed in 1941 with a seating capacity of 350. In 1950, it is listed with with a seating capacity of 500. It is still in use and has been gracefully restored as a multi-purpose venue.

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    Fort Payne Opera House

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014
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    The Fort Payne Opera House, located at 510 Gault Avenue North in Fort Payne, DeKalb County in the U.S. state of Alabama built during the industrial boom in 1889. The Fort Payne Opera House is the only one in the State of Alabama still in use. The establishment has been used as a movie theater, live theater and a public forum. The Opera House still hosts live theatrical events and is on the National Register of Historic Places and the National Register of 19th Century Theaters in America. Completely restored, the Opera House is a cultural center of the community.

    Located on Fault Avenue (main street down Fort Payne)

    The Fort Payne Opera House is a historic building in Fort Payne, Alabama. It was built in 1889 and continues to be in use today, thanks to regular maintenance and upkeep.

    Completed during the region?s industrial boom, the Fort Payne Opera House is the oldest theater in Alabama that is still in use today. Through its more than a century of existence, it has already been used for various purposes including as a movie house, a live theatre, and even as a public forum. It has truly contributed a lot in the development of the area.

    Today, the Fort Payne Opera House is still open to the public. It still hosts live performances, and tours can be arranged for those interested in exploring this historic site.

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    Fort Payne Historic Depot Museum

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 5, 2014
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    Sunday, March 2nd, Tony and I stopped at the Old Depot. It was closed. would have loved to go inside but at least I got to walk around and take some gorgeous pictures of the old depot.

    History:
    The Fort Payne Depot Museum is one of the few surviving nineteenth-century railway terminals in Alabama. Located on the main thoroughfare in Fort Payne, DeKalb County, it features a large collection of Native American artifacts as well as holdings that illustrate the history of the region and the railroad era.

    The Fort Payne Depot was constructed in 1891 by the Alabama Great Southern Railroad. Fort Payne was a main stop on the line, with two express mail trains and as many as six passenger trains daily. The depot was a passenger station for 79 years. Among the most notable people to use or pass through the station were Milford Howard, one of the nation's leading populists

    The depot served passengers until 1970, when passenger service was dropped. After that, it served trains hauling freight only and housed an agent. The following year, the Alabama Historical Commission, Landmarks of DeKalb County, and the City of Fort Payne worked together to have the landmark placed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1973, a local group called Landmarks of DeKalb expressed interest in obtaining and preserving the depot. Railroad officials agreed to trade the depot to the organization in exchange for a building in another location.

    In July 1983, freight service was halted by approval of the Public Service Commission, and the depot remained empty for a year. In 1986, the nonprofit Landmarks of DeKalb Inc., and its board of directors was created to save the depot building after it was threatened with being torn down. The group decided to put a museum into the building. To fund the building's renovation, Landmarks of DeKalb Inc. and the City of Fort Payne were able to secure funding through grants. The exterior of the structure was renovated that same year; it is constructed from pink sandstone with a copper roof, and the interior is finished in native pine and plaster. On October 12, 1986, the depot was dedicated as a museum. Five years later, on October 13, 1991, the depot celebrated its 100th anniversary.

    Also on the grounds is a 30-foot trailer that contains a collection of 94 dioramas, small, intricate scenes created by Italian artist Steve Fiora between 1915 and 1934 out of plaster of Paris and wire mesh. The dioramas, donated by L. A. Shankles, feature characters and settings from fairy tales, historical scenes, and scenic representations.

    The museum is run by a 12-member board of directors and is funded through grants, donations, and the City of Fort Payne. The museum has a curator and one staff member, as well as several volunteers.

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