Fun things to do in Montgomery

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Montgomery

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    Alabama State Capitol Building

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014

    The Alabama State Capitol, listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the First Confederate Capitol, is the state capitol building for Alabama. It is located on Capitol Hill, originally Goat Hill, in Montgomery. It was declared a National Historic Landmark on December 19, 1960.[2][3]
    Alabama has had five political capitals during its history. The first was the territorial capital in St. Stephens in 1817, followed by the state convention in Huntsville in 1819, then the first "permanent" capital in Cahaba in 1820. It was then moved to Tuscaloosa in 1826, until coming to rest in Montgomery in 1846. The current structure is the state's fourth purpose-built capitol building, with the first at Cahaba, the second at Tuscaloosa, and the last two in Montgomery. The first capitol building in Montgomery, located where the current building stands, burned after only two years. The current building was completed in 1851, although additional wings were added over the course of the following 140 years.[4]
    The current capitol building temporarily served as the Confederate Capitol while Montgomery served as the first political capital of the Confederate States of America in 1861, before being moved to Richmond, Virginia. Meeting in the Senate Chamber, the Provisional Constitution of the Confederate States was drawn up by the Montgomery Convention on February 4, 1861. The convention also adopted the Permanent Constitution here on March 11, 1861.[5][6] Over one hundred years later the third Selma to Montgomery march ended at the front marble staircase of the Capitol, with the marches and events surrounding them directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.[6]
    Architecturally, the building is Greek Revival in style with some Beaux-Arts influences. The central core of the building, as well as the east wing to the rear of the structure, is three-stories over a below-grade basement. The north and south wings are two-stories over a raised basement.[7][8] The front facade that is seen today is approximately 350 feet (110 m) wide and 119 feet (36 m) tall from ground level to the top of the lantern on the dome

    The first capitol building to be built in Montgomery was designed by Stephen Decatur Button of Philadelphia. Andrew Dexter, one of the Montgomery's founders, kept a prime piece of property empty in anticipation of the capital eventually being moved to Montgomery from Tuscaloosa. This property, atop what was then known as Goat Hill due to its use as a pasture, was chosen as the site for the new capitol building. Construction began in 1846, with the new building presented to the state on December 6, 1847.[4] Button credited much of his architectural inspiration to Minard Lafever's Beauties of Modern Architecture.[10]
    Button's building was stuccoed brick, with two full stories set over a rusticated raised basement. A two story monumental portico with six Composite columns, topped by a broad pediment, was centered on the middle five bays of the front elevation. A central dome, 40 feet (12 m) in diameter, sat directly on a supporting ring at the main roof level behind the portico. The dome was crowned with an elaborate lantern patterned after the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates. This first capitol building burned on December 14, 1849, little more than two years after its completion.[4] The ruins were cleared by March 1850, with a new building soon to follow

    The current capitol building was built from 1850 to 1851, with Barachias Holt as supervising architect.[4][7][8] Holt, originally from Exeter, Maine, was a master mechanic by trade. Following his work on the capitol he created a successful sash, door, and blind factory in Montgomery.[10]
    The new building utilized the brick foundations and general layout of Button's previous structure, with modifications by Holt. The modifications included a full three-story building over a basement and a three-story front portico, this time without a pediment. Holt's dome was a departure from the previous work also, this time the wood and cast iron dome was supported on a ring of Corinthian columns and topped with a simple twelve-sided glazed lantern. John P. Figh and James D. Randolph were the principal contractors. Figh had previously completed extensive brickwork on the William Nichols-designed campus for the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa. Randolph was in charge of the carpentry work, which was at least partially accomplished by subcontractors.[10] Nimrod E. Benson and Judson Wyman were the building supervisors.[4][7][8]
    The new capitol building was first occupied by the Alabama Legislature on October 1, 1851. The clock over the portico was installed in February 1852. The clock, along with a bell, was purchased by the City of Montgomery and presented to the state in 1852. In proportion to the capitol building, the clock appears as a square white box with black dials and crowned with a gabled roof. The dials are 10 feet (3.0 m) in diameter with 4-foot (1.2 m) minute hands and a 3-foot (0.91 m) hour hands. It has been criticized as architecturally inappropriate on various occasions since its initial installation. With the secession of Alabama and six other Deep South states and subsequent formation of the Confederacy in February 1861, the building served as its first capitol until May 22, 1861.[2] A commemorative brass marker in the shape of a six-pointed star is set into the marble floor of the front portico at the precise location where Jefferson Davis stood on February 18, 1861 to take his oath of office as the only President of the Confederate States of America

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    Walking around Montgomery

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014

    Gorgeous, well maintained fountain in the court square historic district. Although I was born and raised in Montgomery, I never knew the history of this landmark.

    I got further information from the Confederate Digest Blog:

    The Court Square Fountain in Montgomery, Alabama, was erected by the City Council in 1885 over one of the oldest city wells, known as "Big Basin." The fountain, made in Paris, France, is topped by a statue of Hebe, Goddess of Youth and Cupbearer to the Gods. Visitors have an excellent view of the Alabama State Capitol at the opposite end of Dexter Avenue, the heart of downtown Montgomery.

    This square served as the local Slave Market through the mid-19th century. It is reminiscent of old slave markets in other American cities such as Charleston, Boston, Providence and New York City.

    At these markets, slaves of all ages were auctioned, along with land and livestock, standing in line to be inspected. Public posters advertised sales and included gender, approximate age, first name (slaves didn't always have last names), skill, price, complexion and owner's name

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    Court Square Fountain in Historic District

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014

    The Court Square Historic District is a 17.6-acre (7.1 ha) historic district in downtown Montgomery, Alabama. Centered on the Court Square Fountain, the district includes twenty-seven contributing buildings and two objects. It is roughly bounded by Dexter Avenue, Perry, Court and Monroe streets. Architectural styles in the district include Italianate, Late Victorian, and various Revival styles. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 1, 1982. The boundaries were subsequently increased on August 30, 1984.

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    Montgomery Alabama Visitors Center

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 5, 2014

    I highly recommend everyone and anyone visiting Montgomery Alabama to start their day at the Visitor Center at the OLD UNION TRAIN STATION on the riverfront. If you go on Saturday, the parking is FREE here and every where downtown even the meters, so that is good to know. We parked and went inside. It opens at 9am and closes at 5pm.
    This building is the old UNION STATION and also the Train Shed for the Electric Street cars. There is a lot of history in the beautiful old building. The inside is lovely. It is full of brochures and ideas of what to visit. There is a brief video to watch, bathrooms, information and gift shop. So definitely stop. The two ladies inside was very helpful and gave us a really detailed map for walking or you can catch a bus for $3 and get off and on all you need to..
    History of the Union Station building:
    Union Station, also known as Montgomery Union Station or Montgomery Union Station and Trainshed, in Montgomery, Alabama was built by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad and opened in 1898. Erected of brick and limestone on a high bluff along the Alabama River, the station also served passenger trains of Atlantic Coast Line, Western Railway of Alabama, Seaboard Air Line, Central of Georgia, and Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad.
    The station had six tracks under a 600 foot shed, with a coach yard on the south end of the station as well as a Railway Express Agency facility. The station's design segregated passengers by race and incorporated Romanesque Revival elements
    The number of passenger trains using Union Station declined during the 1950s and 1960s. When Amtrak came into existence in 1971, it continued passenger service through Montgomery with a single train (the South Wind, later renamed the Floridian), operating between Chicago and Miami. However, this train was terminated in 1979 and Union Station was closed.
    After a period of disuse, Union Station was renovated for commercial tenants. The train shed still stands, although tracks under it have been replaced by asphalt parking. Declared National Historic Site in 1976
    Amtrak returned to Montgomery in 1989 with an extension of the Crescent called the Gulf Breeze from Birmingham to Mobile; but Union Station was not used. Instead, Amtrak contracted with a travel agent who occupied a former grain silo near Union Station. This Amtrak service was terminated in 1995, and Montgomery has had no passenger rail service since.
    Among other tenants, Union Station currently hosts the Montgomery Area Visitor Center.

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    River City Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 5, 2014

    Walking tour of Montgomery Alabama with My husband Tony Vanoy on Saturday January 12th, 2013 ...

    We were walking up Dexter Avenue from the town center fountain towards the Alabama State Capitol Building when we passed the Dexter Avenue United Methodist Church at 301 Dexter Ave. It is a large beautiful church located across from the Alabama Supreme Court building. It was not open to go inside, tried the door knob but I was able to take photos outside.

    History of the Church:
    The beginnings of Dexter Avenue United Methodist Church may be traced to the Session of the Alabama Conference of the Methodist Church, South, during December of 1887.

    Early in 1888, land was purchased at the corner of Dexter Avenue and Bainbridge Street. At this site was a building containing Dotzheim Grocery and Saloon. Dexter Avenue Methodist Church was formed in January of 1888 in the Saloon. The members met there several years. In 1890, the present site of the church was purchased. The cornerstone of the present building was laid in 1892. The present structure was completed and occupied in 1896.

    Dexter Avenue United Methodist Church has been a presence in downtown Montgomery for more than 124 years, "lifting high the cross of Christ at the crossroads of Alabama." Dexter, one of the most beautiful churches in Montgomery, has been at the forefront of being a strong presence in the heart of downtown Montgomery

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    Supreme Court and State Law Library

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 5, 2014

    Tony and I was walking around downtown Montgomery, Alabama and this lovely building is located on Dester Avenue (one of the main drags through town). It is lovely white in color much like the State Capital building.
    I enjoyed walking around the town!

    The Supreme Court of Alabama is composed of a chief justice and eight associate justices. As the highest state court, the Supreme Court has both judicial and administrative responsibilities.
    The Supreme Court has authority to review decisions rendered by the other courts of the state. It also has authority to determine certain legal matters over which no other court has jurisdiction and to issue such orders necessary to carry out its general superintendence over the courts in Alabama. The Alabama Supreme Court has exclusive jurisdiction over all appeals where the amount in controversy exceeds $50,000 and appeals from the Alabama Public Service Commission.
    The chief justice is the administrative head of the state's judicial system. The Supreme Court may make rules governing administration, practice, and procedure in all courts. Under this authority, rules of practice and procedure and judicial administration have been adopted to eliminate many of the technicalities which cause delay in the trial courts and needless reversals in the appellate courts.
    For qualification, election, and discipline of judges, please see the Appellate Courts Overview page.

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    Hank Williams Sr., Gravesite

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 5, 2014

    Tony and I went to Oak Wood Cemetery in Montgomery Alabama while visiting on Saturday, January 12th. It was such a lovely day, sunny and 78 degrees in January.
    We found the entrance to the Hank Williams Section of the Oakwood Cemetery in Montgomery, AL.
    We drove up the road that goes up hill, at the top the road circles around and and Hank is buried with his lovely wife Audrey Williams near the first turn of the back part of the loop, with a great view of the valley below.
    There is astro turf on his grave site and white marble..I took several photographs to share. There are some white stone benches to sit on and pray or show your respect.
    It was very peaceful up there and the cemetery itself is really large with lots of elaborate tombstones from by gone eras of Alabama.
    Pretty easy to find!

    If you are in the area, go show your respects!

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    Dexter Avenue King Memorial Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 3, 2014

    January 12, 2013, Tony and I was visiting in Montgomery Alabama and who can go to the State Capitol without stopping by one the most historical famous sites in Montgomery.
    The day was lovely and the weather so warm and mild for January. There was a lot of visitors because it is so close to his birthday celebration. It was a Saturday and it wasn't too busy downtown so it was enjoyable to walk around. We parked at the visitors center down by the river and walked through the town. It was a wonderful walk which we highly enjoyed.

    Some history about the wonderful church:
    Dexter Avenue Baptist Church is a Baptist church in Montgomery, Alabama. The church was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.[2][3] In 1978 the official name was changed to the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, in memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who helped to organize the Montgomery Bus Boycott in the church's basement. The church is located steps away from the Alabama State Capitol
    The Dexter Avenue Baptist Church congregation was organized in 1877 and was first known as the Second Colored Baptist Church. The church trustees paid $270 on January 30, 1879 for a lot at the corner of what is now Dexter Avenue and Decatur Street. The first church building was a small wood-frame building, it began to be replaced by the current structure in 1883. The new brick building was not completed until 1889. The church began serving the broader African American community on October 3, 1887 when it hosted the first registration of students for Alabama State University.[4] This community service continued into the 20th century with activities associated with the American Civil Rights Movement. Vernon Johns, an early leader of the Civil Rights Movement, served as pastor from 1947 to 1952. He was succeeded by Martin Luther King, Jr. He was pastor of the church from 1954 to 1960 and organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott from his basement office.

    Hours: Closed on Sunday. -
    Phone: (334) 263-3970
    Address: 454 Dexter Ave, Montgomery, AL 36104
    Architectural style: Victorian architecture
    website: http://www.dexterkingmem…

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    Dexter Parsonage Museum

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 3, 2014

    January 12, 2013, Tony and I visited Montgomery Alabama checking out all the historical sites and enjoying the city. It was a really nice warm and comfortable day, the weather was awesome and so clear..We enjoyed walking through town.

    After visiting the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, we visited the Parsonage home on Jackson Street. Just a few short blocks back. It was a really nice stroll from the church. Just think walking the same paths that the King family must have walked. Amazing experience!

    Brief history of the Parsonage:
    The Dexter Parsonage Museum, historic home to twelve pastors of the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church from 1920-1992, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. It was restored in 2003 by the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Foundation, Inc., under the direction of church members, acting as an Authentication Committee
    Hours: Tuesday - Friday
    10:00 a.m. -- 4:00 p.m.
    Saturday
    10:00 a.m. -- 2:00 p.m

    If you visit Montgomery, check out this historical site and enjoy a walk through the lovely old city.

    Noel Teel visiting on July 26th, 2013
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    First White House of the Confederacy

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 3, 2014

    January 12, 2013, Tony and I enjoyed a walking tour of Montgomery, Alabama. We parked at the Visitors Center down by the river at the Union Station Buidling (free on Saturday and Sunday) and we walked through the town. It was a great day for a walk. It was warm and clear and sunny. We enjoyed it very much!

    We stopped in at this great historical old home of the Confederacy. It was a home donated by the southern people for the President of Confederacy live...President Davis and his family with his children lived it. It is now sitting on the grounds or across the street from the Capitol building complex on donated land. It was moved from its first location down by the river to this spot. The Ladies Historical Society bought the home and had it moved to save it Historical value!!

    The house is lovely and furnished very well. When you go in your greet by a nice gentleman who is the caretaker. He gives you a brief tour of the all the rooms on the first floor and some of the historical facts and stories, then turns you loose. You can go upstairs and enjoy looking around at your own pace. There is a museum upstairs of items that belonged to the family. The original beds that the President and his family slept in.

    The tour was very reasonably priced. I would do it again when I am in the area. I am a history NUT so seeing things more than once is a must..just in case you missed something the first time!!
    Visiting Montgomery soon? Check out his great Historical Site!! you will be glad you did...

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    Old Alabama Town

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 3, 2014

    January 12, 2013, Tony and I did a self guided walking tour of Montgomery, Al. We had a great day. The weather was warm and lovely. We happened upon this 6 block historical section of old homes in Montgomery, Al. There are new homes here.
    Here is a brief history of the buildings:
    Tour the Authentic 19th Century Village Today
    There are no facades or newly constructed buildings here! Our 19th century village features completely authentic 19th and early 20th century homes and buildings that have been saved from demolition, carefully restored, and reopened to the public as a history museum. At Old Alabama Town, you will learn how early Americans of all backgrounds lived and worked in Central Alabama.
    History lives at Old Alabama Town, where six blocks of authentically restored 19th and early 20th century structures beckon you to step back in time to the days of one-room...

    Self-Guided Tours
    We offer self-guided tours Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The last ticket is sold at 3 p.m., though visitors are free to explore until 4 p.m.

    Upon purchasing admission at the Old Alabama Town Reception Center, guests will receive a property map to guide them on their walking tour of our Living and Working Blocks. Visitors are free to explore at their own pace and leave and return throughout the day. Costumed interpreters are available on each block to answer questions.

    A fully guided tour of the Ordeman House is also included in general admission. Tours of the Ordeman House are available Monday-Friday at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. Ordeman tour times are subject to change without notice. Call 1-888-240-1850 on the day of your visit to confirm times.

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    Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

    by Basaic Written Jun 5, 2013

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    The Dexter Avenue Baptist Church was organized in 1877 and the present building was built in 1885. It was the second Baptist Church in Montgomery. What really brought this small church out of obscurity, though, was the pastor who served here from 1954 to 1960; Reverand Martin Luther King, Jr. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was organized here as were some of the other early events in the fight for civil rights. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    There is a variation of the peace pole on the church grounds. "Peace Poles" are on display at many locations around the world to promote peace and tolerance for all.

    Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Peace Pole
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    Dexter Avenue United Methodist Church

    by Basaic Updated Jun 5, 2013

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    This beautiful church was completed in 1896 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It has long been an important part of all aspects of life in the community, and is a neat looking building.

    Dexter Avenue United Methodist Church
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    The Winter Building

    by Basaic Updated Jun 5, 2013

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    The Winters Building was built in 1841 to house the Montgomery Branch of the Bank of St. Mary’s. It was from the telegraph office in this building that the telegram authorizing firing on Fort Sumter was sent. This began the Civil War. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    The Winter Building
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    Governor Jones House

    by Basaic Written Jun 5, 2013

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    This house was built in 1855 and was the home of former Alabama Governor Thomas Goode Jones who served from 1890 to 1894. He was a noted jurist as was his son. They founded a law school in the rear of the house. The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Governor Jones House
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