Spanish Fort Travel Guide

  • blakeley battlefield state park
    blakeley battlefield state park
    by doug48
  • spanish fort tourist office
    spanish fort tourist office
    by doug48
  • blakeley battlefield
    blakeley battlefield
    by doug48

Spanish Fort Things to Do

  • blakeley cemetery

    pictured is the blakeley cemetery. the town of blakeley began as a 18th century plantation. by the 1820's blakeley was a booming riverfront town. the town of blakeley was the site of the last battle of the civil war. after the civil war the town declined and it's residents moved on to other locations. today the last remaining remnant of the town is...

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  • blakeley state park

    located on SR 225 just north of spanish fort is the blakeley battlefield state park. the battle of blakeley was the last major battle of the civil war. at the park you can see remnants of breastworks, battery sites, redoubts, and rifle pits. a very interesting place to visit for those interested in civil war history.

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  • tourist office

    a good first stop is the spanish fort tourist office. it is located a block north of the I-10 spanish fort exit. here you can get information on the attractions of spanish fort, mobile, and other alabama locations.

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  • tensaw river

    at blakeley park you can tour the tensaw river on the delta explorer tour boat. blakeley state park has much to offer the tourist. the park offers hiking and nature trails, camping, fishing, and horse trails. see their web site for more information.

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  • Take A Water Tour

    There is a tour will take you through the wetland areas as well as passing historic sights such as the Civil War batteries Huger and Tracey. It will also stop at Blakeley State Park.

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  • The Hanging Oak

    This is one of the landmarks in the park. The Jury Oak or Hanging Tree was said to have been the site of a hanging after the first court session at Blakeley.

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  • Saluda Hill Cemetary

    The Saluda Cemetary is just along from the entrance to Blakely State Park on the main highway 225. The Historical Marker says it all "“Saluda Hill Cemetery is a private historical cemetery established in 1824. Among the graves here is that of Zachariah Godbold, the only known Revolutionary War veteran buried in Baldwin County. Many Blakeley...

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  • Mobile-Tensaw River

    The Mobile-Tensaw River Delta is like a wilderness area in coastal Alabama. Encompassing 260,000 acres of wetland habitats, it is the second latest delta system in the United States. The River borders Blakeley State Park.There is a quarter mile of waterfront boardwalk with two observation decks on the Tensaw River as well as an observation kiosk...

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  • Imagine the Scene

    While driving around (and on sometimes track type areas) you can almost feel the battle strategy. You can see the ravines, redoubt and battery sites, all clearly marked out to correspond with your map and the info given for each spot.

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  • Spanish Moss

    Some of the giant moss-draped live oaks in this region are estimated to be over 800 years old and were already mature trees when the Spaniards arrived in 1519..

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  • Blakeley Cemetary

    This old cemetery is where many of the original Blakeley settlers, victims of yellow fever were buried..

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  • Blakeley State Park

    Blakeley State Park is the largest national historic register site east of the Mississippi River. The park encompasses 3,800 acres leading right down to the banks of the Tensaw River. This area is the site of the last major battle of the Civil War and has been kept in excellent condition, preserving the various areas where the battle took place....

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  • The Wonderful Homes

    If you take a drive around the streets surrounding Blakeley State Park in Spanish Fort you will see delightful homes set amongst the trees in really tranquil settings. The areas we drove around were so lush and pretty..

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  • The Water Dwellers

    Should you decide to explore the Mobile-Tensaw Delta you would most likely see alligators, wading birds, raptors, wildflowers, cypress stands and pretty much everything else the Okefenokee offers. .This was a little crab I came across..

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  • The Hiding Tree

    This large water oak with a hollowed base around the roots was said to be the hiding place for Confederate soldiers fleeing after the Battle of Blakeley..

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Spanish Fort Hotels

Spanish Fort Restaurants

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    by keeweechic Updated Jan 14, 2003

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    We found this place driving from a Walmart store back to the highway - Spanish Fort was on the other side of the Freeway. I saw the sign for sandwiches and salads and that suited us for lunch. It was Sunday and pretty quiet.

    They have a very good choice of sandwiches, pastries and salads... but the coffee...ah.. it is great! In fact, when we were passing back through Mobile from the Florida coast, we made a special point of stopping back at PJ's for lunch again especially for the coffee. I even came away with a bag of it to take home.

    Its a New Orleans Company... what more can I say.
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Spanish Fort Transportation

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    by keeweechic Updated Sep 8, 2006

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    On I-65, take exit #33 (the exit for State Hwy 225). Travel south on Hwy 225 until the signs for the park entrance appear on the right.

    If you are on I-10, take the Daphne exit and go left or west on Hwy 98. Continue going straight and Hwy 98 will become Hwy 90. You will reach a T intersection in Spanish Fort. Go right on Hwy 31. Move into the left lane to take a left onto State Hwy 225. On 225 go north for 4.5 miles. From there follow the signs to the park headquarters.

    Blakeley State Park is located north of Spanish Fort.

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Spanish Fort Local Customs

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    by keeweechic Written Oct 15, 2002

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    The climate of the lowlands of Alabama is almost subtropical. The highest amount of rain hits the region as afternoon thunderstorms in July, August and September. Summers are usually extremely hot and humid with temperatures often reaching above 100 F. The Winter temperatures are mile and rarely get below 40F. Spring and Fall are pleasant for visiting. We visited in Fall (Autumn) and it was short sleeves even in the evening.

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Spanish Fort Warnings and Dangers

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    by keeweechic Updated Oct 15, 2002

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    As you are driving around the park, beware of the Turtles. Usually slow moving, then can get pretty fast when being pursued by a camera:-) The Alabama red-belly is a large freshwater turtle that grows up to about 13 inches in length. This however was just your plain grey variety.
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