Seward Favorites

  • Seward Visitors' Center
    Seward Visitors' Center
    by AlbuqRay
  • Display Inside the Seward Visitors' Center
    Display Inside the Seward Visitors'...
    by AlbuqRay
  • Jefferson Street and Third Avenue
    Jefferson Street and Third Avenue
    by AlbuqRay

Most Recent Favorites in Seward

  • 850prc's Profile Photo

    Calling all amateur geologists

    by 850prc Updated Mar 27, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Coarse volcanic beach sand, Kenai, AK

    Favorite thing: Alaska, due to its volcanic, seismic and glacial past, present and future has a very wide variety of geological treasures. Everywhere you look and walk, you'll find all sorts of colorful rock, crystals, sand and such. The sand under your feet on the beach may have formed deep within the earth from molten magma, or perhaps was born after millenia of sedimentary pressure.

    So if geology rocks your world, I think you're going to enjoy Alaska very very much.

    Was this review helpful?

  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Seward Waterfront Park

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jan 5, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View of Resurrection Bay from Waterfront Park
    3 more images

    Favorite thing: Seward Waterfront Park is located along Ballaine Boulevard, right on the beach of Resurrection Bay. It has paid camping (tents $8, RV's $12 , utility sites $25). To pay, use the self-registration stations at most campground entrances. It has water and electric sites or dry camping. There is a separate area for tents. There are picnic tables, fire rings, a shower house and restrooms. It is walking distance to the Small Boat Harbor and historic downtown. For more information the phone number is 907-224-4055 and campground@cityofseward.net is the e-mail address.

    Besides the camping facilities, a bike path runs the length of the park. The south end of Waterfront Park includes the Alaska Sea Life Center, Founders' Monument, Mile 0 of the historic Iditarod Trail, and the Old Railroad Depot (see separate tips on each). There is also a skateboard park near the south end of the park.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Camping
    • Fishing

    Was this review helpful?

  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Visitors' Centers in Seward

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jan 1, 2008
    Seward Visitors' Center
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: The current Seward Chamber of Commerce Visitors' Center is located at 2001 Seward Highway out toward the airport. The old visitors' center was a 1916 Pullman railroad car at Third Avenue and Jefferson Street. It is not in use now. The Kenai Fjords National Park Visitor Center (1212 4th Avenue, P.O. Box 1727, Seward, AK 99664; 907-224-7500) is located adjacent to the harbormaster building by the Small Boat Harbor on Fourth Avenue. The Kenai Peninsula Online provides a nice writeup on things to see and do in Seward.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • PA2AKgirl's Profile Photo

    State Flag

    by PA2AKgirl Updated Apr 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I was born in Pennsylvania and lived there most of my life. I know what our flag looks like but I can't tell you why it has 2 horses and is blue. Looking it up, I see there's things on it I had no idea were there. Corn and ships and eagles...there's just too much. But the Alaska state flag--probably one of the most familiar-- is among the nicest flags of the states. (My opinion--don't take offense if you're really in love with your own state flag). The point of all of this is the flag of Alaska has a good story, the design is simple and deserves a monument to the boy that created it. There's even a song about the flag. If you don't know the story, the flag was created by a 13 year old native boy named Benny Benson who lived in Seward at the time. Usually I don't take direct information from other sites when writing my own tips, but his reasoning for creating the flag he did is worth quoting:

    "The blue field is for the Alaska sky and the forget-me-not, an Alaskan flower. The North Star is for the future state of Alaska, the most northerly in the union. The Dipper is for the Great Bear—symbolizing strength."

    The monument is located in Seward by the lagoon coming in off the Seward Highway and 2nd Ave.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • PA2AKgirl's Profile Photo

    Off Season

    by PA2AKgirl Written Apr 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the empty downtown in April

    Favorite thing: The summer is short but the seasonal businesses open as early as possible to accomodate visitors. Many don't close down at all, which is wonderful for people like us who prefer to visit either on the shoulder or off seasons. Prices are much cheaper and while some choices may be a little more limited, you get more of a chance to interact with the locals and see what life is like without hoards of tourists. Granted, Seward doesn't get all the warm and they take the brunt of coastal storms, but it's quiet, friendly and has many places to hide from the weather. There are plenty of winter activities--guided or solo including winter fishing, snowmobiling (called snowmachining in Alaska), skiing and festivals.

    Was this review helpful?

  • PA2AKgirl's Profile Photo

    Moose Pass

    by PA2AKgirl Written Apr 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Coming in on the train or driving in on the Seward Highway from Anchorage, you'll go through Moose Pass before getting to Seward. A lot of times you'll see a town listed on a road map of Alaska, drive right through it and have no idea you did so. Or there are just a couple buildings along the highway and no place to stop. Moose Pass isn't like that...it's actually a village with some organization and character. It's not large--like 200 people live there but it's the type of town where everyone waves at you when you drive by. I love those places!! If it wasn't 100 miles away from Anchorage, it would be the perfect place for us to live. It has accomodations, an RV park and campground, a general store with a deli, a cute church, school and places to eat. Around the summer solstice, they have a festival with crafts, a triathlon, food and other activities. It's located on Trail Lake so it's setting is gorgeous. Quiet, pretty and friendly--it's a great place to stay if you really want an alternative to Anchorage or Seward. Even if you are staying in another place, you should make a stop at Moose Pass.

    Was this review helpful?

  • PA2AKgirl's Profile Photo

    Back Roads (ie Exit Glacier)

    by PA2AKgirl Written Apr 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Exit Glacier is a main attraction of Seward--it's the only part of Kenai Fjords accessible by vehicle. However, this road isn't maintained in the winter so you may feel a bit defeated having come all this way and not being able to drive the road. It is closed, technically. However, you are able to park your car at the gate and showshoe, snowmachine or ski out to the glacier in the winter. Throughout Alaska, the unmaintained roads have the sign you see in the picture and the advice is good--these roads receive the brunt of the fierce winter weather. Depending upon the road's location, there is information regarding the current status, how to access it and when it should open. Information for the Exit Glacier Road can be found at the Kenai Fjords website. Other back roads that aren't gated are marginally maintained but it actually may be easier to drive them when they're still partially frozen. When they thaw, it's usually a muddy mess of potholes.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    Otterly fun

    by annk Written Jan 29, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    sea otters

    Favorite thing: If you stroll along the harbor or anywhere along Resurrection Bay you are bound to see sea otters popping their little heads out of the water. They always appeared to be having fun, rolling over on their backs and perhaps consuming a tasty bivalve retrieved from the depths below.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • annk's Profile Photo

    Cruise Ships

    by annk Written Jan 29, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Radisson Cruise Line

    Favorite thing: From May through September, it's common to see cruise ships docked at the harbor. Seward is either a final destination or starting point for smaller cruise ships sailing the Anchorage to Vancouver route. Passengers are bussed to Seward or Whittier from Anchorage. Larger vessels sail out of Whittier.

    In general, Seward seemed like a quiet town until the cruise ships were docked and thousands of passengers were roaming the streets.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Whale Watching
    • Cruise

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Sea Lions

    by zrim Written Mar 9, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    fat happy sea lions

    Favorite thing: A colony of fat happy sea lions. A herd such as this is usually ruled by an extremely large and extremely dominate bull male sea lion. The fjords and bays off the Kenai Peninsula are chocked full of salmon and other tasty fish. I don't believe that these sea lions often go hungry.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Whale Watching
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Whales

    by zrim Written Mar 9, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    humpbacked whale

    Favorite thing: The great humpbacked whales are frequent visitors to the waters off the Kenai Peninsula. The best way to see the whales is to obviously get out on the water in a boat. The tour boats operated through the National Park are probably the best way to combine glaciers and wildlife. The captain of our boat was a grizzled veteran and knew where to find the seals, sea lions, puffins and sighted this whale well before any of the rest of us.

    Related to:
    • Whale Watching
    • National/State Park
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Eagles

    by zrim Written Mar 9, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the grand old bird

    Favorite thing: Wildlife is plentiful. Bears, seals, sea lions, otters and of course the great sperm whale. Anyone who feels a thrill when seeing the great American bird, the eagle, should definitely make their way to Seward. As we trolled out of the marina in the early morning, the eagles were lined up on dock posts much like pelicans in a Floridian harbor.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • National/State Park
    • Whale Watching

    Was this review helpful?

  • RSeppeler's Profile Photo

    A must do hike in Seward

    by RSeppeler Written Feb 25, 2003
    Bob,Pete & Jim on Mt Marathon

    Favorite thing: Climb Mt Marathon to the waterfalls. The walk is easy and the sight of Seward and the small boat harbor is well worth the hike. Take a camera and plenty of film, along with bear spray. Can never be to sure.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Though Seward is a pretty...

    by richiecdisc Written Sep 11, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Though Seward is a pretty town, the real reason to come to this part of the
    planet is to experience fjord land at its best.  There are numerous ways
    to do this and all entail some kind of monetary expenditure on your part. 
    Their season is short and tourist dollars pretty much make this town tick so
    forget about the costs and get ready to enjoy one of nature's fine displays of
    splendor.  You can do a cruise, flight seeing trip, or kayak your way with
    an experienced guide or solo if you so dare.  Whatever you decide, just
    enjoy.

    Fondest memory: Ina and I had been on a road trip that brought us from New Jersey through the
    western Canadian Rockies to the Inside Passage of southeastern Alaska. 
    We'd done numerous hikes including the multi-day Chilkoot Trail from Skagway
    into the Yukon and a week long solo kayak trip into Glacier Bay in that two
    month period. So, we had taken some time in Anchorage to recharge our batteries
    and act like tourists.  We set off on our drive down the Kenai with a loose
    plan to enjoy some nature but not do anything out of the ordinary. We wanted to
    do a short backpacking trip near Resurrection Pass, but we'd ruled out another
    kayak trip as too expensive, time consuming, and ultimately taxing on our
    already frayed nerves.   There was the Portage Glacier which
    is a tidewater glacier that is accessible by car but despite its beauty, it's
    really just a stop and snap a photo sort of place.  It doesn't lend itself
    to lingering and gets understandably crowded.  We'd been on the ferry for a few weeks so a
    cruise didn't appeal to us either.  I might have opted for a flight but
    they were steep in price and trying to keep the peace, I agreed with Ina that we
    forgo it and look for another alternative to enjoy the park.   And boy did
    we find one.  Kenai Fjords National Park is predominately an
    inaccessible mass of land that is best viewed by air to get the full picture of
    it's magnitude but for a close up inspection, a kayak is surely the best way to
    fully appreciate it's intricacies.  There are few ways to see much of the
    park without parting with a fair amount of money so for the budget traveler it
    can appear a daunting place to visit.  I had read about the one
    trail the mostly sea bound park offered months earlier and when we arrived at
    the visitor center on a bright sunny morning, the rangers immediately said that
    we'd lucked out with an extremely rare purely clear day and that the only
    thing to do was the hike to the Harding Icefield.   This 300 square
    mile mass of ice with the occasional peak jutting through is part of what you
    would see from the air and here was a chance to see some of it for free. 
    All it would take is some physical expenditure.  The trail is only 3.5
    miles one way but it climbs 3,500 feet in that distance so you know you are in
    for a good steep hike.  We set off a bit late for such an adventure but
    Alaska summers allow such casual regard for time and light.  We'd have
    plenty of time with the sun staying up until midnight.  The trail lacked
    the dramatic buildup of the Mt. McGinnis hike we'd done near Juneau but it
    passed through wild flower filled fields as it climbed steadily and then steeply
    the first two thirds of the trip.  The final portion was through a huge
    permanent snowfield.  Ah, nothing like hiking in shorts through vast white
    spaces with the sun shinning brightly.  Did I say, bring
    sunglasses?   As we pushed ever onward, those returning from the top
    walked by with obvious looks of glee on their lucky faces.  That gave us
    all the motivation we needed to make it ourselves.  Arriving at the hut, we
    talked to the ranger on duty and he was even giddy with enthusiasm.  I
    guess when you are up there in bad weather a good proportion of the time, you
    appreciate the good even more.  He reiterated that days like this were two,
    maybe three times a year and to just linger as long as we could.  We walked
    the short distance further to the edge of the Icefield and too excited to eat
    just yet, snapped some photos and soaked in all that nature had bestowed upon
    us.  At times like these, there's little question that we are just a small
    part of this thing we call the universe and yet enlightened enough to see our
    ultimate insignificance in it. 

    Was this review helpful?

  • seth0919's Profile Photo

    Walk, Hike, go out on a boat,...

    by seth0919 Written Aug 26, 2002

    Favorite thing: Walk, Hike, go out on a boat, hit the local eateries, and just really experience this awesome little town.
    This photo is of Resurrection Bay.

    Fondest memory: The amazing view during the July 4th fireworks show...the sky wasn't really dark at midnight; we were able to see all the way across Resurrection Bay. Mountains surrounding the town and they offered the perfect dark backdrop in the lit sky for the fireworks.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Seward

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

60 travelers online now

Comments

Seward Favorites

Reviews and photos of Seward favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Seward sightseeing.

View all Seward hotels