Flagstaff Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui
  • South San Francisco Street and Butler Street.
    South San Francisco Street and Butler...
    by Yaqui
  • 18 N. Leroux Stree
    18 N. Leroux Stree
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Flagstaff

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    Downtown Murals

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 30, 2012

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    South San Francisco Street and Butler Street.
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    As we wondered around a bit, I came upon just a couple of murals. I am sure this lovely city has more. So the time next I visit I will explore more and add them.

    Artist jetsonorama “The San Francisco Peaks Are Sacred” located behind McGaughs Smoke and Bootle, South San Francisco Street and Butler.

    One of the funkiest murals I have seen was located in Heritage Square by Artist Joe Sorren title "The Veridic Gardens of Effie Leroux," on Aspen Ave between Leroux St. and San Francisco St.

    The other is by Artist Joe Sorren again and located on 23 N. Beaver St., Midgley's 1926 Building - A "Noah’s Ark" mural. I like it!

    Located on 18 N. Leroux Street by Artist Joe Cornelius aka www.muraljoe.com is a great mural of "NAU" pride.

    Just across from the NAU pride 18 N. Leroux Street is another, but I don't know the artist name is a lovely representation of turn of the century ladies and gentlemen strolling downtown.

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    Barringer Meteor. Crater Arizona

    by PeterVancouver Updated Feb 19, 2012

    Probably one of the most perfect meteor crater in the world

    Almost 2.5 miles in circumference and was created by an impact event in excess of the power of 150 atomic bombs leashed on Japan during WWII

    Directions to the Crater centre

    Meteor Crater is located off I-40 at exit 233, then 6 miles south on the paved road. 35 miles east of Flagstaff, 20 miles west of Winslow, in Arizona, USA

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    Hwy 89A-Red Rock Canyon Road

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 21, 2009

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    Silver eagle making flight-not real
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    This is a wonderful highway for views and also to stop and enjoy the small shops, see cabins and campgrounds along the way and some unique art. These are some of those. The whole area is like going back into the 1950's, and nothing has changed. NO chain restaurants, or motels' just good folk liking you to stop by.
    The major views start after the Oak Creek Vista-about 5 miles south of Flagstaff. then maneuver switchbacks to get into the valley and then wind around the highway for 20 miles all the way to Sedona. There are a few restaurants, and gas; but not much. Along the way are 5 campgrounds, the main purpose for coming to the canyon, and Slide Rock State Park. It was packed the day I tried to get in, and actually full. This was apple celebration day.

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    Sedona Views

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 20, 2009

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    Red rocks on the mountains
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    The main reason to come to the town is to see the mountains surrounding it; or maybe to shop, or maybe to see artists work, or maybe get your vortex in line. Whatever reason, there are some very nice views to note and take pictures of.

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    Sedona-Maps

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 20, 2009

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    Map of the town streets
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    This town is about 28 miles south of Flagstaff on Hwy 89A. That is the most logical way to come because taking US 17 from Flagstaff is 65 miles, and you would miss most of the scenery along the way. The town has two main arteries going through it; one Hwy 89A going east/west, and 179 going to the south and connecting to I-17 15 miles away.
    The town got its foothold back in 1876 with J.J. Thompson setlling here and framing. Later Schnebly family came here and bought an 82 acres of ground to farm. The town got named after his wife; SEdona

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    Red Rock Country

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 20, 2009

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    Eroded red rock on the mountaintop
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    The scenery along Hwy 89A, the main route to Sedona is called Red Rock country because-of course, what would you think it would be called. Besides the red rock, there are wonderful settings of the clouds and sun in the area. This red rock area covers most of the surrounding terrain of Sedona for 20 miles around, and Red rock State Park on Red Rock Loop Rd is where a lot of people come to see the sites. I started to do so, but then found out besides a national park pass, there is a $4 entry fee, and another $8 if you wanted to hike. For what I asked?

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    Coconino National Forest

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 20, 2009

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    Vendors selling Indian items
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    This forested area is a National Forest Service park along Hwy 89A on the way to/from Sedona. It is a nice trip, even though the switchbacks can get tedious with slow traffic in front of you. The park starts about 5 miles south of Flagstaff and connects with other park systems at Sedona around 20 miles further. Along the way is Slide Rock State Park, and a number of camping sites and campgrounds, and cabins to stay in the forested area.
    Oak Creek vista is the more outstanding for pictures of the pine trees, and canyon valley and switchbacks to take going down/up from there. The local Indians set up tables to sell wares at Oak Creek. YOu get a pass from the Ranger for $5, unless you have an annual or lifetime park pass. This then is also good for parks in the Sedona area, except at Red Rock Loop park it costs ANOTHER $8 to enter.

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    Grand FAlls

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 20, 2009

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    Road not worth the ride

    This sounded like a great drive to go and see the falls on the Navajo reservation. Well, that idea changed after driving down the road on the reservation that was sheer madness-ripple-ripple- for the washboard road. It would have been nearly 10 miles of this, and I had enough after one mile. To get here, I drove 15 miles east on I-40, then took Leupp Rd north 2 1/2 miles, then drove another 20 miles to end up at the turn off for the gravel washboard road. It was a long drive for naught. If you have a 4x4 you may enjoy it a bit more.
    The falls do not run freely until spring going into summer usually, but thought I would look and see for myself. The attached my entice you to make the drive

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    Church of the Nativity

    by Yaqui Written Apr 14, 2008

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    When wondering around, this beautiful grey stone Catholic Church caught my eye. I could tell immediately that it was very historical due to its Gothic architecture. The original church was built in 1888 on Beaver and Ellery Street with much of the brick lying was done by Father Carlo M. Ferrari. The first service was held Christmas Eve in 1888 and hence came the name, “Church of the Nativity.” Yet, as the town grew, so was the need for a larger church. So around 1911 the structure was moved to another temporary site and then to its present day site and was completed in 1930.

    Tours are very welcome and still hold regular masses.

    Corner of Cherry Avenue & Beaver Street

    Exit onto from Route 66

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    Orpheum Theatre

    by Yaqui Written Apr 14, 2008

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    I am never so happy to see old theatres being revitalized and maintained. There are almost like a time capsule when you walk into them. I know the Fox theatre in Bakersfield and a couple of historic theatres in the Sundance Square in Fort Worth, Texas are so beautiful inside. You can almost hear past whispers of the people who frequented them during their heyday. Originally called the Majestic Opera House in 1911, this theatre was owned by John Weatherford who also owned the beautiful Weatherford Hotel next door. It was thoroughly enjoyed by the city of Flagstaff with showing of movies, but in the winter of 1915 New Years morning the roof fell in from the overload of snow. The theatre did find temporary quarters until in 1917 when it was rebuilt in grandeur and renamed the Orpheum Theatre. Unfortunately, like many old historic theatres, the Orpheum fell on hard times and the doors closed in 1990’s. There she sat for some time, until someone would love and restored her to her old self in 2002. Now she is enjoyed by a whole new generation and hopefully into the future.

    15 W. Aspen St - Flagstaff, AZ 86001

    Between Leroux and San Franscico Street off of Route 66, just behind Weatherford Hotel

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    Flagstaff Arizona Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Written Apr 14, 2008

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    The marker reads” Named for a pine tree stripped of its branches by a party of immigrants and used as a flagpole for a patriotic celebration on July 4, 1875. Nearby Antelope or Old Town Spring provided water and lead to the establishment a railroad construction camp when the Atlantic & Pacific pushed west in 1882.”Arizona Development Board 1961

    Located on the corner of Beaver St and Route 66 next to the Chamber of Commerce Buidling.

    Be careful, lots of traffic on this corner!

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    Logging Wheels

    by Yaqui Written Apr 14, 2008

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    These wheels were restored in 2003 by the Arizona Historical Society Pioneer Museum. Originally built by S.C. Overpack Carriage Works of Manistee, Mich., between 1880-1910.

    Logging wheels were first used by farms around 1870 to clear the trees from there land. Then when the lumber industry began around 1880’s along with a team of horses, once the trees were felled, cut down, the wheels were backed over the logs and horses were disconnected. The tongue of the wheels was then lifted into the air and chain was run under the logs and up to hooks on top of the axle. As the axle was pulled back down, it lifted the logs off the ground. A chain was then run around the front of the logs and the tongue to prevent the tongue from flipping back up. The horses were then re-harnessed to the wheels and the logs were pulled out of the woods to the railroad for shipment to the mill.

    Please read the plaques that many displays have, you learn so much from them. Its where I get much of my information.

    Burlington-Santa Fe Railroad depot on South Beaver Ave and Route 66

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    Baldwin Steam Engine No. 25

    by Yaqui Updated Apr 14, 2008

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    Engine No.25 was purchased in 1917 by the Arizona Lumber and Timber Company, which it proudly served. It was eventually purchase in 1995 by the city of Flagstaff and now serves as a reminder of all those who worked so hard to make Flagstaff what it is today. This is a really nice display and you can tell the volunteers took their time and lovingly restored her to her former glory.

    Located right off of Route 66 just down from the Visitor Center

    Visitor Center
    One East Route 66
    Flagstaff, Az 86001

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    Freight Depot (Original Railroad Depot)

    by Yaqui Written Apr 14, 2008

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    This lovely stone building was built around 1883-89 as another depot for passengers and freight, when the railroad decided it was prudent to move it from the original town site half a mile east to its present day site, so the trains did not have to start up on the steep hillside. What was so significant about this was many merchants moved their businesses across the road so they could capitalize on attracting potential customers arriving from the trains and the convenience of supplies. This prompted a whole new town site and soon became the main town site after the old town site was devastated by a fire in 1884.

    There is a lovely little courtyard right on the corner with a wonderful statue and benches to enjoy the day.

    One East Route 66
    Flagstaff, Az 86001

    On the corner of San Francisco St. and Route 66.

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    Heritage Square

    by Yaqui Written Apr 14, 2008

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    When we were strolling along, we came upon this huge square. It had some lovely benches to sit on. A couple people were enjoying them by reading a book in the warm sun that day. I found out they have concerts here during the summer months, plays, and movie nights too. Seems like a great area to just hang out in.

    On Aspen Ave between Leroux St. and San Francisco St.

    Exit off of Route 66 onto either Leroux St. and San Francisco St.

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