Globe Things to Do

  • Roof Construction
    Roof Construction
    by Basaic
  • Roof Construction
    Roof Construction
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  • Ceremonial Room
    Ceremonial Room
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Best Rated Things to Do in Globe

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    Don't Miss Besh Ba Gowah

    by Basaic Written Nov 21, 2008

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    One place in the Globe area you should not miss is the Besh Ba Gowah Archeological Park. This park shows how archeologists discover, recover and can rebuild sites. They have restored parts of a 1200 Salado Village. While doing the excavation and study of the area they also discovered the remains of a 900 AD Hohokam Settlement. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for seniors. Children under 12 are free. Hours are 9 AM to 5 PM year round.

    Besh Ba Gowah Sign Besh Ba Gowah Sign
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    Besh Ba Gowah Roof Construction

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    The roof of the buildings in Besh Ba Gowah were built using wood logs that were intercrossed then supplemented with yucca fibers and reed mattings. This was then covered over with several layers of mud. The roof was commonly used for food storage, grinding grain, and other activities, especially during the hot summer months.

    Roof Construction Roof Construction
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    Besh Ba Gowah Ceremonial Room

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    Of all the rooms excavated at Besh Ba Gowah, this is probably the most interesting. It is the largest room on the site and because of the very unique features, the types of artifacts found inside and the small storage rooms surrounding it, this is believed to be a Ceremonial Room. This is the first Ceremonial Room ever scientifically excavated at a large Salado settlement. Entrance to the room was through a central hatchway in the roof and down a long wooden ladder. Three sides of the room had built in benches where participants in the ceremony would sit. On the east side of the room was an altar with a smoke and echo chamber above it. Below the altar is a square hole called a Sipapu. This Sipapu was filled with ground turquoise and sealed off with a large quartz crystal. It is believed this Sipapu represented a navel of the earth where spirits could traverse from the middle earth to this one.

    Ceremonial Room Ceremonial Room
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    Globe Historic District

    by Basaic Updated Dec 1, 2008

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    Globe has a fairly extensive Historic District with over 40 buildings of interest. The district is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Since they frequently have the prettiest architecture, I will begin my coverage with the churches. First is the St John's Episcopal Church which was started in 1904 and was built in the Gothic Revival Style of architecture. It is the oldest church in continuous use in the county and is listed individually on the National Register of Historic Places. Next is the First Presbyterian Church which was built in 1911 by famed architect E. Fruin. The church organ was a gift from James H. "Rawhide Jimmy" Douglas one of the most respected mining men in the country at the time. Third is the Holy Angel's Church and Rectory which was designed by New Jersey architect James Pigott and was built in 1918. It too is on the National Register of Historic Places. The last church I'll cover is the St Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church built in 1928 in the Mission Style. The congregation was formed in 1880 and is the oldest in the county. The current building was built to replace one that was destroyed in a fire. The cornerstone was recovered from the original structure and was placed by Governor George W. P. Hunt.

    St John's Episcopal Church First Presbyterian Church Holy Angel's Church and Rectory St Paul's
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    Globe Historic District 2

    by Basaic Written Dec 1, 2008

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    The first two buildings listed in the Historic Downtown Globe Walking Tour brochure are the McKevitt Building and the International House. The McKevitt Building was built between 1899 and 1906 by C. E. Fruin. The bottom floor housed shops owned by Yugoslavian immigrants. The building next to it (left) is the International House, which was built in 1902 by Pascual Nibro. This was the first Mexican-American owned business in Globe. The brochure lists it as the largest Adobe structure in Arizona (but Schieffelin Hall in Tombstone claims that too). It also used to house the International Saloon. Today it houses the longest continually operating saloon in Globe. It is listed individually on the National Register of Historic Places. The next two buildings are the Quihuis Saloon Building and the Sang Tai restaurant. The Quihuis Saloon was built between 1929 and 1932 in the Vernacular Art Deco Style. This is one of the few Art Deco buildings surviving in Globe and it still has the backbar with stained glass décor. The Sang Tai Building was built in 1905 in the Vernacular Commercial Style and was a Chinese Restaurant. Next we see the Van Slyck & Meyers Building, which dates from 1889 but was rebuilt after the big fire in 1896. It originally housed the infamous St Elmo Saloon. The pressed metal ceiling is the only thing that remains of the saloon. Next is the DeLacy Hotel which opened in 1910 as the Old Dominion Hotel. It was built in the Neoclassical Revival Style. It is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Last is the Elk’s Building which was built in 1910. It has the distinction of being the tallest three story building in the United States and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

    McKevitt and International House Buildings Quihuis Saloon and Sang Tai Buildings Van Slyck Building DeLacy Hotel Building Elks Building
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    Besh Ba Gowah

    by Basaic Updated Nov 21, 2008

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    The first photo here shows the entrance to Besh Ba Gowah. This was originally a long roofed corridor which led to the largest structure and the central plaza. Jewelry, pottery and other artifacts found here indicate the central plaza was one of the main areas for trading and gathering with the other villagers. Photos 2 and 3 show the restored largest structure in the park. Photo 4 shows another restored home. Several tips giving more details about Besh Ba Gowah follow.

    Entrance to Besh Ba Gowah Besh Ba Gowah Besh Ba Gowah Other Structures
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    See the Visitor's Center/Museum

    by Basaic Written Nov 21, 2008

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    Your first stop will be the Visitor's Center where you can pay the entrance fee. They also have a short informative film, a nice museum and gifts and souvenirs you can buy. Photo 1 shows some of the Salado Artifacts found in and around Besh Ba Gowah. Photos 2 and 3 show tools and arrowheads used by the Salado. Photo 4 shows a representation of how archeologists believe Besh Ba Gowah looked at its peak. Photo 5 shows some typical Hohokam Red on Buff Pottery from around 900 AD.

    Salado Artifacts Salado Tools Salado Arrowheads Model of Besh Ba Gowah Hohokam Red on Buff Pottery
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    Salado Pottery in Museum

    by Basaic Written Nov 21, 2008

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    Besh Ba Gowah has the largest collection of Salado Pottery. The most wide spread form of Salado Pottery is the Gila Polychrome (or multicolored) Pottery. Photo 5 shows a few good examples of the other main type of Salado Pottery, the Roosevelt Black on White Pottery.

    Salado Gila Polychrome Pottery Salado Gila Polychrome Pottery Salado Gila Polychrome Pottery Salado Artifacts Salado Roosevely Black on White Pottery
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    Besh Ba Gowah Inside Largest Structure

    by Basaic Updated Nov 21, 2008

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    You can enter the restored largest structure and climb to higher floors via ladders. Originally the structure was three stories high with an access to the roof. Here you can see the inside of the structure. Be careful when using these ladders.

    Besh Ba Gowah Ladder Ladder Inside the Structure
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    Besh Ba Gowah Floor Levels

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    Scientists can determine what they believe to be the uses for many rooms and sites in places like Besh Ba Gowah, and even why some rooms are constructed the way they are. Features of the rooms, artifacts found in and around them, their placement in the site, even the customs and traditions of todays Native American Tribes can give us clues to the past. Some things, however, remain a mystery. In Salado settlements, unlike many other tribes, the floor levels vary quite a bit. Even the experts cannot determine why the floor level of the room you see here is so much lower than the rooms around it.

    Salado Room Salado Room
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    Besh Ba Gowah Foundations

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    The Salado used three main designs for forming the foundations of their rooms and buildings. The first one was using single row of large flat stones. The second alternated vertical slabs of rock with wooden wall support posts. The third main style combines the first two styles.

    Foundation for Room Foundation for Room
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    Besh Ba Gowah Small Stone Mound

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    Another mystery at Besh Ba Gowah is this small stone mound. Large mounds that this have been found at over 40 other sites in South Central Arizona. Some of them were 1 to 2 stories high and supported entire 50 room pueblos. It is believed they may have been used to support the residences of the elite members of the village. What do you suppose was the purpose of this much smaller platform?

    Small Stone Mound
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    Central Plaza

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    This is the Central Plaza for the Besh Ba Gowah Village. It served as the center of day to day life for the village. Food was prepared here, family and friends socialized here, and ceremonies were held here. It was also the main burial area for the village. Over 150 burial sites were recovered here including the town leaders whose elaborate burial tombs denoted their status.

    Central Plaza Central Plaza
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    Besh Ba Gowah Reconstructed Room

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    This is a reconstruction of a typical room from Besh Ba Gowah. Typical rooms had little or no windows and a small door. They also had a hatchway in the roof which served as an entranceway, a place for the smoke to get out, and provided natural light.

    Reconstructed Room Reconstucted Room
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    Globe Botanical Garden

    by Basaic Written Nov 22, 2008

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    If you continue on the same trail that leads from the main part of Besh Ba Gowah Archeological Park to the Ethnobotanical Garden you will find the Globe Botanical Garden. It features several varieties of cacti and flowers.

    Flowers Flowers Prickly Pear Cactus Staghorn Cholla Staghorn Cholla Buds

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Globe Things to Do

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