Fauna & Flora, Grand Canyon

8 Reviews

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  • Fauna & Flora
    by painterdave
  • Fauna & Flora
    by Jplummer
  • WARNING: This scenery contains rattlesnakes
    WARNING: This scenery contains...
    by AKtravelers
  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    Rattlesnakes: Overrated

    by AKtravelers Updated Dec 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    WARNING: This scenery contains rattlesnakes

    If the one thing that is stoppping you from hiking the Grand Canyon is the fear of poisonous snakes, think again. Though the Grand Canyon is home to lots of venomous reptiles, they are of minimal danger to humans. As long as you wear thick sturdy hiking boots, your feet should be safe. The precautions one should take is to never stick your hands where you can't see them (i.e. climbing onto a ledge) and, should you see a snake -- don't antagonize it. For the most part, rattlers and other snakes don't want to attack you -- which is why they give off that rattling warning in the first place. Remember, the primary purpose of their venom is to kill prey -- if they waste their venom on you they have to wait a long time until they can go hunting again, and they might go hungy. You're neither small enough nor appetizing enough for a rattler to eat, so he won't bite you unless you make him!

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Better Not Close Up!

    by painterdave Written Jul 17, 2013

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    The elk in the park seem tame, they are not afraid of the tourists, and the tourist's cars. They love to munch the grass in the evenings. My best advice is for you NOT to get too close. If it is rutting season, they can be quite nasty all of a sudden. You don't want to get poked by those antlers.
    This elk put on a show for everyone, and we saw him several different evenings. We also saw a small group in the mornings near the train track.
    And yes, there are no bears in the park. There had been one that came down during a past drought, but went back when the weather changed.
    Look for condors...big horn sheep, and don't go reaching under rock ledges without looking first.

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    DONT FEED THE ANIMALS

    by dila Written Jan 13, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    coyote

    dont feed the animals.
    one warning because people feeding the squirrels there is now also an bobcat who has nice snacks (the squirrels) nearby the condors who have maybe a nest.
    so again dont feed wild animals!!!!!!!!
    also when we drove out of the (stil in the park) a coyote came to the car. i opened the window and it came closer because it thought it could get food but i opened the window because i wanted to take pictures.
    if i had given it food (i think others did it already) the next time it thinks car is food and than it will be hit by a car.
    the story from the bobcat i heard from the people who work there. they are affraid it will go to the nest of the condors.

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  • azcanyondreamer's Profile Photo

    Don't Bust the Crust

    by azcanyondreamer Written Apr 2, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cryptobiotic soil abounds here in the desert. It takes a long time to recover if you even step on it. You will notice it on the ground that looks like it has been shaped by heavy rains or something. It often has raised areas and is dark in color. The cryptobiotic soils in the desert help control erosion. Keep to the trails, DO NOT cut switchbacks they are there for a reason.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Desert
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Russophile's Profile Photo

    Traveling with dogs

    by Russophile Updated Aug 13, 2003

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    Dogs are not allowed below the rim of the Grand Canyon. The campground allowed them as long as always it is never left unattended. That is my dog Laika in the picture. She looks like she is contemplating going below the rim, the little felon.

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  • Jplummer's Profile Photo

    Trails & Animals

    by Jplummer Updated Sep 29, 2004

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When walking trails, keep in mind that you have to walk back. There have been fatalities of people walking down the Canyon until they are so exhausted that they can not walk back up. Do not walk steep and strenuous trails on your own. No one would know if you fell. Be prepared with water and food.
    Do NOT touch the animals. Even squirrel bites can be deadly, they can carry disease. The animals can walk around and not notice your presence, do not instigate them.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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  • Wildlife ... there are...

    by dzni Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wildlife ... there are rattlesnakes and scorpions here. WATCH OUT WHERE YOU PUT YOUR HAND! They're not that big, the scorpions, so you have to be careful... just slightly bigger than a spider, some of them. Also, there are cacti here, so be careful with that too.

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  • silvia-m.b's Profile Photo

    Please don't feed squirrels...

    by silvia-m.b Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Please don't feed squirrels !!!!!!!! This animals cannot eat fried potatoes, hamburgers or 'burritos'. Sometimes this animals can bite and is not funny. Now seriously: for their health is not good. The same with the poor deers. Please, don't give them food. Animals should eat grass, nuts,...we are doing a very bad action trying monopolize their attention. Keep in mind please!!!!!!!! Save nature!

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