Fauna & Flora, Grand Canyon National Park

2 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Desrt Bigihorn camoflagued on the banks above
    Desrt Bigihorn camoflagued on the banks...
    by mtncorg
  • Springs bursting forth at Vasey's Paradise
    Springs bursting forth at Vasey's...
    by mtncorg
  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    DESERT BIGHORN SHEEP

    by mtncorg Written Nov 6, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Desrt Bigihorn camoflagued on the banks above

    At the bottom of huge fearsome cliffs, you can, on occasion, run past desert bighorn sheep. They are watching you as you float by watching them.

    There are rattlesnakes of different varieties - the Grand Canyon rattlesnake being the most common. Rarely there are mountain lions and bobcats. Commonly, there are bats. You will know evening is drawing on when the first bat flies over your camp.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Rafting

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    VASEY'S PARADISE

    by mtncorg Updated Nov 6, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Springs bursting forth at Vasey's Paradise

    There are several places along the canyon where springs burst directly out of the cliff walls. This is the first big one you see going downstream. Where there is water there is plantlife and a profusion of green contrasting with the red rocks around. These springs are in close proximity to the Anasazi dwellings in the last tip. The springs were named after a prominent botanist of the 19th century by the explorer, John Powell. Poison ivy is also within the profusion of green so remember to watch for leaves of three! You have come 32 miles.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Rafting

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Grand Canyon National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

88 travelers online now

Comments

View all Grand Canyon National Park hotels