Fun things to do in Grand Canyon National Park

  • Lookout Studio-view of Bright Angel
    Lookout Studio-view of Bright Angel
    by BruceDunning
  • Supai Tunnel carved out of rock
    Supai Tunnel carved out of rock
    by BruceDunning
  • View of roling buttes on horizon
    View of roling buttes on horizon
    by BruceDunning

Most Viewed Things to Do in Grand Canyon National Park

  • kahnjetta's Profile Photo

    Incrediable Hiking!!

    by kahnjetta Written Nov 7, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Grand Canyon National park is one of the most amazing hikes to try. Experience breathtaking scenery, camp under the stars. Witness wildlife, learn about the fascinating natural and cultural history of the Canyon, and challenge yourself physically. You will learn about the geologic and cultural wonders as you hike through one of the most famous and breathtaking landscapes in the world! We had the best time, it was a bit challenging due to the heat in June, the temperature got up to 104. Bring plenty of water, have comfortable hiking shoes, healthy snacks and get a good night sleep. When you get to the bottom of the canyon you can stop for lunch, and then back to the top.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    South Rim: Wheelin' around

    by goodfish Updated Oct 26, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Having some wheels to get around the park makes it easy to create your own itinerary, and that doesn’t mean having a car. Bright Angel Bicycles has rentals for both big and small pedalers, and trailers for hauling the tots. They also provide narrated bike tours, and return shuttle service for rides out to Hermit’s Rest: a road closed to private vehicles most of the year. Miles of park routes provide rides as short as a couple of miles to combining several for round-trip treks of nearly 40. All rentals include helmets, and a map of recommended itineraries, including points of interest and safety guidelines, can be downloaded from their website:

    http://bikegrandcanyon.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/websiteversion3.pdf

    Do note that biking isn’t allowed on pedestrian-only walkways (noted on the map) or trails below the rim…not that you’re crazy enough (I hope) to want to huff a two-wheeler up South Kaibab anyway? :O)

    Wheelchairs and strollers can also be rented here as well as adult tricycles and tandem bikes. Stop into their cafe for a morning coffee before your ride, or to pick up sandwiches, granola bars and whatnot for refueling along the way.

    This was a VERY busy place the day we came by so get there early or reserve your bikes in advance, if at all possible, during high season!

    If you’re not interested in their shuttle packages, the park’s free shuttles are equipped to handle 2-3 bikes on racks mounted in front of the buses. You are required to load, secure, and unload your wheels yourself.

    Bright Angel Bicycles
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Cycling
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mayzhou100's Profile Photo

    Annimals in the Grand Canyon

    by Mayzhou100 Written Jun 2, 2014

    It was so great to see the wild animals closely. They are cute, pretty and can stay easy and calm when people get close or cars pass by. Just remember don't feed them. Let's keep it naturally as it is.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mayzhou100's Profile Photo

    Grand Canyon-South Kabob Trail Hiking

    by Mayzhou100 Updated Jun 2, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We only hiked South Kabob Trail to Ceder Reach about 1.5-2 miles. The winter hike was not bad at all. It was very sunny and warm that day (Dec.23,2013) and daytime temperature was about 40-50 F. when we got to Ceder Reach, birds were flying around us chirping.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mayzhou100's Profile Photo

    Grand Canyon Sunrise and Sunset

    by Mayzhou100 Written Jun 1, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The air of Grand Canyon in December was very clear but cold. It made the sun rise and sun set remarkable scenes. You can see the bright red Canyon stones and white snow, purple sunlight floating above the horizontal line. Very impressive.The best place for sun rise viewing is at Yaki Point by 7- 8 am. The best view point for Sunset is at Hopi Point and Bright Angel Lodge around 4:30-5:30.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nicckie's Profile Photo

    Fishing for Trout

    by Nicckie Written Dec 23, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was so excited when I heard there was fishing at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. I'm not a bigger fisher person - I don't have my own poles and I don't always like hooking the bait on myself, but its an activity I always enjoy and like to try whenever the opportunity presents itself. Being at the bottom of the Grand Canyon is a bit different than being out on a chartered boat from the marina, though and I soon realized this may not be the activity for me. You need to bring your equipment with you. If there are rentals available, I didn't see any. But also be prepared to do some paperwork before leaving. You need to get a fishing license from Arizona and it must include a trout stamp, which runs about $50. So while it initially sounded fun, it quickly disappeared off my to-do list for this trip. However, we were in the same group with our buddy, Romano. At the ripe young age of 85, this was Romano's 40th (yes, that is not a typo) trip to the canyon. He was clearly well prepared, with his grappa in his pocket and his fishing pole in tow. He caught 17 fish while we were there! Nice job for a day's leisure activity...

    Romano's successful day! Trout anyone? Proud display Cleaning up!

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    SAnta Fe Railroad-Amtrak

    by BruceDunning Updated Nov 30, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is still in use, and a number of people come to the park on a train. The ride is from Williams Arizona (60 miles south) to Grand CAnyon. This was built in 1901 by Atchison, Topeka and Santa FE RR which had a newer track coming west and to here then. It wanted to promote tourism to the park, and aligned with Fred Harvey for hotel and eateries. The depot is two story and of original wood made in log cabin style. It is only one of three still remaining. It is used by Amtrak today.
    The train operated until 1968, and later revived by a group in 1989 to bring back the railway rides. Cost to rework was $2 million. It carries over 200,000 visitors annually now.
    The RR line closed in 1968, but revived in 1989 and now carries over 200,000 passengers annually.

    Entrance from track side Map with location View from the east
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    North Rim -Lodge

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 23, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is 80 years celebration of the finishing of the lodge. It is not changed at all; maybe some upgrades, and the new lodge that was built over the first in 1937 after a fire in 1932. It totally destroyed the old lodge. The huge wood beams make the inside seem as rustic as it is. Gilbert Stanley Underwood made the back porch area a spectacular view for the guests/tourists. The views never did change, though

    CAbins by the lodge
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Bright Angel Lodge

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 23, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the main anchor of where people come and congregate. It gets very clustered around the back door on the trail. Many buses come here and drop off tourists for short stays of 1-2 hours and that brings in another 100-200 at one time. I had a hard time just getting through the crowd to see the hotel. The lodge has an ice cream shop, gifts shops, 2 restaurants, and a history room. The history room is a lot on Fred Harvey era, who had the concessions for food and operated the hotels. In 1935 Mary Colter designed the lodge and Fred Harvey built it.

    Front entrance to hotel Rear area with shops-people Inside main lobby area Rooms-modern day look
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Luxury Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Kolb Studio-Lookout Studio-O'Neil cabin

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 23, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These are three sites near the Bright Angel lodge and worth the walk along rim trail to get to see the insides. The Kolb Studio is now a gift shop, was built in 1904 by Ellsworth and emery Kolb. they loved the park and every day, in good weather they took tourists down the Bright Angel trail a way and took photos of them on mule back. They did not work every day, so in the interim, they hiked all around the canyon. Daily, they went down to the canyon floor to process the photos. That takes going down in 4+ hours and getting back up same time. A long day. In 1911, they decided to follow the route of John Wesley Powell and explored the Green and Colorado rivers over 3 month period. They were close to losing their lives more than once. The result was they made a film and showed it for a fee to tourists in the studio, and later on road shows. The Lookout studio was designed by Mary Colter in 1914. Bucky O'Neill cabin is from 1895 and when he was a miner used it for shelter. later he became a judge, politician, and author. The building is the original.

    Kolb Studio entrance Gifts inside Kolb Studio Lookout Studio-view of Bright Angel Bucky O'Neil cabin
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Hopi House-VErkamps Curios

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 23, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These have a lot of history form the days of old. Mary Colter designed and helped build Hopi House in 1905 and the theme was patterned after the Hopi name of Orabai, meaning Hopi village. It is two story and chuck full of gifts to buy. The Hopi Indians used to sell the goods themselves here when it first began. The Verkamp Curious was a gift store and from 1905 John and later family ran the store until 2008. It sold out to the park service. It is now the visitor center for main information.

    Outside ruin look of Hopi house Hopi look house Gift pcking the inside of Hopi HOuse Verkamps-now visitor center
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    South-El Tovar Hotel

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 23, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It was built in 1905 by Charles Whittlessey, and famed architect who also designed other structures for Fred Harvey group. This is a four story hotel and has 79 rooms. It is in the same condition as when built, but some porches were added. The lobby has open faced log supports. There is a gift shop, restaurant, and lobby relaxing area. It is a luxury hotel, and has been that since the Atchison, Topeka, SAnta Fe RR brought people here on its tracks back in early 1900's

    Front view of hotel The end with rotunda overlook North end view of hotel Dark view of the lobby Map of location
    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Tusayan Indian Ruins

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 23, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a great place to stop and see the exhibit inside the old structure as well as the ruins on the trial outside. There are Ranger programs every 1/2 hour to walk along the trail and explain the history of the Tusayan Pueblo Indians settling here and how they lived over 800 years ago. They had a good environment to find food, hunt, access to water and shelter in this area, and on a flat plateau, with suburb views. The living quarters were about 1 mile form the cliff edge, and in a forest area. Archeologists believe they lived here in late 1100's. These ruins are as they were found in 1930's when excavated.

    Tusayan Information Main visitor center and museum Ruins in the grounds Kiva for ceremony
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Western Bluebird

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 6, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Western Bluebird is amongst many different birds that call the Grand Canyon home at some point during the year. Since the canyon has many different terrains, bird variety is unsurprisingly large. The bluebird is in the thrasher family that feeds on insects and berries. This particularly colorful male was putting on quite a show for us at El Torvar one afternoon.

    putting on his colorful show
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Tusayan Ruins

    by richiecdisc Written Jun 5, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Tusayan Ruins are the National Park's concession that indeed Native Americans once called this area home around 1185 which is little surprise considering its beauty. This is just one of 4300 such recorded sites within the park's borders. The Grand Canyon does extend beyond the park's borders and there are Native Americans still living in some of those areas. They can be visited but are not part of the National Park pass system. The ruins here are not the most elaborate but are interesting to see if you have the time. We visited them on our way out of the park. It was an overcast day and it was a nice break from all the Grand Canyon splendor of the proceeding days. Remnants of the circular kivas are easy to see though not as well preserved as what you can see at Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. There is also a free small museum on site to help explain what you see.

    remnants of a kiva
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

Grand Canyon National Park Hotels

  • Yavapai Lodge

    We decided to go to Grand Canyon on a labor day weekend within the same week, on that Wednesday...

    more
  • Phantom Ranch

    With only 1 place to stay at the bottom of the canyon in a national park that has over 5 million...

    more
  • Bar 10 Ranch

    Parashant National Monument, PO Box 910088, St. George, UT 84791-0088, Arizona, United States

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Business

Latest Grand Canyon National Park Hotel Reviews

Yavapai Lodge
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 6 Reviews
Trailer Village
2 Reviews
Moqui Lodge
1 Review
Mather Campground
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 4 Reviews
North Rim Campground
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 3 Reviews
Grand Canyon Lodge - North Rim
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 6 Reviews
Phantom Ranch
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 4 Reviews
Bright Angel Campground
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Cottonwood Campground
1 Review
Indian Garden
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Thunderbird Lodge
1 Review
Kaibab Lodge
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review

Instant Answers: Grand Canyon National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

21 travelers online now

Comments

Grand Canyon National Park Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Grand Canyon National Park locals.
Map of Grand Canyon National Park