Hiking Hazards, Grand Canyon National Park

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  • Needed help  getting close without losing balanc
    Needed help getting close without...
    by BruceDunning
  • Riders cannot control the mules duty
    Riders cannot control the mules duty
    by BruceDunning
  • Wearing flip flops for 3 mile hike
    Wearing flip flops for 3 mile hike
    by BruceDunning
  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Be Prepared and IN Shape

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 23, 2009

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    Hard to walk far
    2 more images

    I noticed a number of people at Grand Canyon that literally could not walk 50 feet without making a stop to rest. This is a park for all, but it is beyond me how people cannot hardly function and then come to places that could be dangerous to their health because being out of shape, let alone the grief some people have to contend with to assist. Many do not even have proper attire to be ready for the short walks. These pictures are not to make fun of these people, but to show how "out of shape" really means

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    Mules on trails Leave Residual

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 23, 2009

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    Leaving a trail to follow
    2 more images

    The hike on some trails are not too appealing if you have to maneuver around piles and fresh urine. This happened to me on two hikes, and in a confined trail area, if leave a smell not soon to forget. Not many trails have mules also use them , so you may want to check first which do. I guarantee on a hot summer day, you literally could pass out from the stench.
    The guides recommend to stay off the trail for 50 feet before and after they get by you. Maybe it is to stay out of the way of a whiff.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    If hiking down, remember the...

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 5, 2009

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    stepping to the outside is a good choice here

    Hiking protocol at the Grand Canyon is mules have the right of way. It's a good idea not only because the people riding the mules are paying a lot of money or because the poor mules are carrying a lot of weight. These big, strong beasts of burden are not something you want to get in the way of. Listen to what the mule driver tells you to do and just do it as quickly as possible.

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    If you do the hike later in...

    by richiecdisc Updated Jun 5, 2009

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    yup, the Grand Canyon can get icy cold

    If you do the hike later in the fall or early winter, you may need crampons for the descent. The ice does dissipate as you go down in elevation so if you don't need them early on, you probably won't need them at all. This shot is from my first visit in 1994 when I aborted the day hike to the canyon floor due to the icy trails. I returned a year later to tackle the rim to river to rim day hike a month earlier in the season.

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    Don't attempt to hike to the river & back in 1 day

    by goingsolo Written May 5, 2004

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    Grand Canyon

    Many people underestimate how difficult it is to hike back up, especially after hiking down. It takes the average person twice as long to hike up as it does to hike down. It is usually much hotter in the afternoon during the return trip than it was on the descent, which leads to fatigue and dehydration. Take heed of the warning signs posted by the rangers at the start of the trail and do not attempt this.

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    Flash floods

    by goingsolo Written Apr 20, 2004

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    avoid slot canyons and any area where water can bu

    Flash floods are common in the Grand Canyon, especially during monsoon season which runs from about June through September. Storms can come from out of nowhere and create a powerful runoff which can easily carry away people, tents and in some instances even pick up trucks. Be very careful during this time of year and never go exploring in a slot canyon.

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  • ceswho's Profile Photo

    Hiking health hazards!

    by ceswho Written Jul 26, 2003

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    Moderation is the key to having an enjoyable hike. Hike within your ability, maintain proper body temperatture, balance yoyr food and water intake, and rest often. Emergency situations include:
    HEAT EXHAUSTION,
    HEAT STROKE, HYPONATREMIA,
    HYPOTHERMIA.

    Trouble on the trial:
    Rangers are prepared to respond to problems of all kinds and will, if available, provide a necessary and appropriate level of assistance.
    Helicopter evacuations are an ambulance service only. Evacuations are very expensive. Flying a helicopter in the canyon is risky given the uneven terrain for landings and the odd wind currents.

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    Elevation Sickness

    by ceswho Written Jul 26, 2003

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    The Grand Canyon elevation 7000 feet above sea level. The temperature can soar .
    Use caution near the edge.
    Avoid shocking experince when there is a thunderstorm.
    Hiking tips brochure available at the Visitor center.

    Use common sense! and Enjoy!

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    Rockslides

    by goingsolo Written Apr 20, 2004

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    Rockslides are another hiking hazard. Although rare, they can happen. Listen closely while hiking and if you hear the sound of falling rocks, be prepared to move very quickly

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