Kayenta Off The Beaten Path

  • Heading South on Hwy 160
    Heading South on Hwy 160
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  • Heading North on Hwy 160
    Heading North on Hwy 160
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  • Off The Beaten Path
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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Kayenta

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    Navajo Shadehouse Museum

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    This is between Hampton Inn and Burger King on Hwy 160 in Kayenta.

    It is a self guided tour of some examples of Dine structures. There are some signs explaining the tradition and the reason for the design. The signs are fading some. One of the Hogans you can walk into with some nice displays of traditional Dine living. So, take some time to stop and explore them. Very interesting.

    One of the structures is a hogan that is a sacred home for the Diné (Navajo) people who practice traditional religion. Every family -- even if they live most of the time in a newer home -- must have the traditional hogan for ceremonies, and to keep themselves in balance.

    The Navajos used to make their houses, called hogans, of wooden poles, tree bark and mud in a cone shape. The doorway of each hogan opened to the east so they could get the morning sun as well as good blessings.

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    Code Talkers Museum in Burger King

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    6 a.m.-11 p.m. daily.

    This exhibit is Free.

    There is a wonderful little musemm located inside the Burger King. My hubby ran in here to get the boys some snacks for our next leg of adventure and he was all excited about finding this treasure. I did not get the chance to see it, but he enjoyed it.

    The Code Talkers where Native Americans to transmit coded messages goes back as far as World War I, when troops with the 30th Infantry Division used Cherokees as radio men while fighting alongside the British in France. A few Choctaw soldiers performed similar duties in 1918, and members of the Comanche and Meskawi tribes worked as radio operators in World War II.

    But the Navajo Code Talkers turned this method of communication into a science. The code contained as many as 400 words. The Japanese were skilled at breaking code, they remained baffled by the complexities of the Navajo tongue and thus were unable to decipher the messages. One estimate at the time indicated that fewer than 30 non-Navajos, none of them Japanese, could understand the language well.

    In 1942, there were about 50,000 Navajo tribe members. As of 1945, about 540 Navajos served as Marines. From 375 to 420 of those trained as code talkers; the rest served in other capacities.

    Navajo remained potentially valuable as code even after the war. For that reason, the code talkers, whose skill and courage saved both American lives and military engagements, only recently earned recognition from the Government and the public.

    Hwy U.S. 160 in Kayenta, about 300 miles northeast of Phoenix. Take Interstate 17 north to Flagstaff, U.S. 89 north to U.S. 160 (the Tuba City turnoff), then U.S. 160 east to Kayenta. The Burger King is on the northern side of the road.

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    Comb Ridge

    by Yaqui Written Dec 28, 2008

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    Comb Ridge is a large formation of Dine Sandstone that is first seen just North of Kayenta and parallels the highway for many miles until it turns North towards Utah. The ridge is a exposed rock layers that have been bent at the Comb Monocline. These layers of rocks appear angled charply upward at a horizontal level. They have weather into bare rounded surfaces. The teeth seen in the ridge are fairly rounded due to the errosion of exposure of the wind, sand, and rain.

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    Baby Rocks

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    Composed of sandstone, siltstone and clay, this dark red cliff has been eroding by wind and rain leaving what looks like thousands of baby rocks.

    When traveling North or South along Hwy 160 you will see the sign. Just North of Kayenta.

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    Church Rock

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    Heading South on Hwy 160
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    Church Rock stands 300 ft. It is a natural rock that looks like a church steeple. It is actually a volcanic rock, called a plug and was carved out by the winds. Located on the Navajo Reservation just south of (Tse' Biindzisgaii) Monument Valley, on Hwy 160 just 10 miles east of Kayenta.

    A prominent feature north of US Route 160 a few miles west of the Indian Reservation Route 59 intersection. If your on the way to or from Four Corners on Hwy 160, you cannot miss it either.

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Kayenta Off The Beaten Path

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