Lost Dutchman State Park Things to Do

  • Superstition Mountains
    Superstition Mountains
    by Basaic
  • Superstition Mountains
    Superstition Mountains
    by Basaic
  • Superstition Mountains
    Superstition Mountains
    by Basaic

Most Recent Things to Do in Lost Dutchman State Park

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    See the Beautiful Superstition Mountains

    by Basaic Written Dec 4, 2008

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    Superstition Mountains
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    One of the big attractions to Lost Dutchman State Park are the spectacular views of the Superstition Mountains. The Superstition Mountains were formed starting about 40 million years ago as the last of the sedimentary layers was worn away exposing the Pre-Cambrian Granite Base below. About 25 million years ago a series of steam eruptions and collapses formed a huge caldera filled with rhyolite rock formations. Later renewed pressure from magma below pushed the solid rhyolite interior 200 feet into the air in a geologic phenomena called a "resurgance". This caused a resurgent dome which the wind and rain eroded into what we see today.

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    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel

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  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Park Facilities

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 25, 2007

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    Pausing to rest at a bench along a nature trail
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    There is much to do at Lost Dutchman State Park. The park is well developed with modern ammentiies which include:

    Visitor Center with maps and publications for sale.
    Picnic areas with tables and grills
    Group use areas
    Restrooms with showers
    Hiking and nature trails
    Campground with 35 electrice sites
    Dump station

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  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Green Boulder

    by Stephen-KarenConn Written Feb 25, 2007

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    The Green Boulder
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    Another dramatic rock formation, and one which hikers may easily walk around, is called the Green Boulder, no doubt because of green algae which grows on its side. This huge rock, soaring several stories high, is at about the half way point on the 2.4 mile Treasure Loop Trail, and near the junction with the Prospector's View Trail.

    The Treasure Loop Trail actually goes behind and above the Green Boulder which is at 2,580 feet above sea level. From here there is an outstanding view. In one of the photos Karen and I can be seen posing above the Green Boulder, overlooking an inspiring desert landscape which seems to go on forever.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Praying Hands

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 25, 2007

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    Praying Hands
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    Perhaps the most dramatic of several interesting rock formations visitors to Lost Dutchman State Park may see is the "Praying Hands." The formations consists of two rock spires pointing skyward. They may be found on the northeastern slope of the mountain beneath the dramatic peak called "The Flatiron."

    No trail leads all the way to the Praying Hands, but hikers on the Treasure Loop Trail will approach near enough to take a photo - such as the ones seen here. A telephoto lens helps.

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    Continue Along the Apache Trail

    by kazander Written Jan 20, 2006

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    Tonto National Forest
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    Lost Dutchman is actually at the beginning of a wonderful journey along the Apache Trail. Route 88 offers up a spectacular array of scenery, so while you are out this way enjoy it!
    Just across the road from the entrace to Lost Dutchman is the Old mining town of Goldfield. It's a little kitchy and touristy, but a fun place to visit. (The kids would like the train ride) It's mostly little shops and tours, the train ride the mining tour, ect. There are also a couple resturants including an Ice cream shop and a bakery. After leaving Lost Dutchman and Goldfield continue East on RT 88, you will have enter into Tonto National Forest. If you have time, pull off and do a bit of hiking. Back in the car, continue on the winding road and you will come to Canyon Lake. A gorgeous spot with steep rock faces on one side of the lake and sandy beaches on the other. Boat rentals are available. By this time you may be a bit hungry. you could stop off at the lakeside dining resturant or push on to the funny little town of Tortilla Flat (population 6) there is but one little resturant, a gift shop a post office and a tiny motel here (as well as campgrounds). This is where we ended our Apache Trail trip(we were pressed for time) but you could continue on to Apache Lake, Roosevelt Dam and Lake and Tonto National Monument. Tonto National Monument is a Native American dwelling built into a cave on a cliffside. I will definately be heading that way next time I travel the Apache Trail!

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    • Road Trip

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    Cacti at Sunset

    by kazander Updated Jun 3, 2004

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    Cacti at Sunset

    We stayed in the park until sundown to get some great sunset shots. The park closes at 10pm but I wouldn't recommend hiking in the dark, unless you had a flashlight, even then I would think it would be best to wait until the next day.
    The park has camping facilities, but no hookups for RV's. There is a separate fee for camping in the park.

    The park is open 365 days a year from sunrise to 10pm.

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    everything here is a must see!

    by kazander Updated Jun 3, 2004

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    California Quail

    Unfortunately we did not see much wildlife in the park. The only thing we saw was this one bird. We fought over who got to take the picture for a minute,(we figured 2 of us would definately scare it away) but in the end it was Lou who took this amazing shot of a California Quail.

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    a beautiful view

    by kazander Updated Jun 3, 2004

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    Lost Dutchman State Park

    There are many trails around this park ranging from easy to difficult. Most of the concentrate on the relatively flat land in front of the Suspicious mountains. (It's farther than you think!) But the trails labled difficult will take you you to the rock face and will involve climbing. It was getting late when we were there so we did not mange to climb around on the rocks, but we did get quite close to them. The trails connect with one another, you may want to bring a map to help you navigate. The visitors center will provide you with one.

    Park Hours
    The park is open 365 days a year from sunrise to 10pm.

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    • National/State Park

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Lost Dutchman State Park Things to Do

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