Navajo Travel Guide

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by cbear
  • Navajo
    by cbear
  • Lake Powell looming above Page, AZ
    Lake Powell looming above Page, AZ
    by cbear

Navajo Things to Do

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    by cbear Updated Sep 5, 2008

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    - LAKE POWELL five miles north of Page, Arizona (north-central border of Arizona/Utah)

    - ANTELOPE POINT/CANYONS five miles northeast of Page, Arizona. Check out the 'skinny-caves' or slot-canyons.

    - HORSESHOE BEND five miles south of Page, Arizona.

    - MONUMENT VALLEY east of Page, Arizona & north of Kayenta, Arizona (north-east border of Arizona/Utah)

    - CANYON DE CHELLY southeast of Page, Arizona & south of Monument Vally (in the heart of Navajoland)

    - THE GRAND CANYON southwest of Page, Arizona.

    Lake Powell looming above Page, AZ
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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    by sourbugger Updated Nov 15, 2005

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    "That is some landscape out there, I would love to paint it, so many interweaving colours"

    "Unfortunately we don't have time on this trip, so you will have to take all your views from the highway"

    "Odd, isn't it, we want to have a good look round and get to know the place, whilst earlier travellers across this area must have wanted to get the hell outta here as soon as possible"

    "mmm.I suppose so. They certainly didn't spend alot of time nameing these areas. On this side we have the painted desert, and on the other the Petrified Forest"

    "It does exactly what it says on the tin"

    Next>>>

    old postcard of the area
    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

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  • Navajo Hotels

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Navajo Local Customs

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    by cbear Written Oct 4, 2002

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    Ask for permission from the natives before taking pictures, a 'token of appreciation' may be included (a dollar or so). Bear in mind there are twenty-one different tribes in Arizona alone and their cultural lifestyles vary.
    Navajo Indians consider direct eye contact to be disrespectful. They are generally soft-spoken and shake hands lightly as a way of greetings and even parting salutations.
    Once they get to be comfortable with you, their sense of humor may be received as sarcastic, they are generally just joking.
    If you are traveling through open-range areas, be aware that livestock is a staple to their lifestyle, Don't disturb grazing areas, and leave if asked to.
    The Navajo language is a difficult language to speak let alone learn, remember the Navajo language was used as a code by honorable Navajo Indian 'Codetalkers' during World War II.
    The traditional lifestyle of Native American Indians is based on spiritual connection with nature and the environment, the circle is sacred, like the sun and earth.

    Navajo ranch hand
    Related to:
    • Travel with Pets
    • Horse Riding
    • Arts and Culture

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Navajo Warnings and Dangers

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    by cbear Written Oct 4, 2002

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    It can get HOT in Arizona, Bring/wear sunscreen, a cap/hat and drinking water. Know where you are going, let people know your destination/route and return date and time. Consider taking a cellphone.
    Beware sudden FLASHFLOODS. It may not be raining in your vicinity, but there are many washes and 'skinny-caves' that look dry but can quickly turn into dangerous, strong & fast muddy rivers!
    Watch for ANIMALS, both your own and mother nature's; rattle-snakes, coyotes, scorpions frequent the back country and the highways, especially at night when it is cooler. Consider checking for a boarding kennel locally (928) 645-3633 as you do daytrips/tours, bring copies of your pet's health records.
    The roads can be PRIMITIVE in some areas. Dirt roads can turn into mudpots very quickly. Four-wheel drive vehicles are recommended or hire a local guide/tour. Call Navajo Parks & Recreation (928) 698-2808, (928) 691-1438, or (928) 871-6636.

    Glen Canyon to Lee's Ferry
    Related to:
    • Travel with Pets
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Desert

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Navajo Off The Beaten Path

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    by cbear Updated Sep 5, 2008

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    Check out the 'TRADING POSTS' new and old, but inquire about some of the old traders and their stories. Access to many of the old trading posts are bad with not much to offer. But, there are some close to the bordertown communities. For, instance in Page, AZ., I recommend www.blairstradingpost.com *

    Head out to the big POND of Lake Powell. Rent a boat from Antelope Point Marina (928-645-5900) and tour the 2,000 miles of shorelines of the canyons on the lake. Grab a fishing pole (and license too) and go FISHING, or hire a guide service. I recommend Captain Jim at www.bubbasguide.com (note: good local link site) and tell him his crew was recommended by the Andersons Feed Co. www.abearco.com or email cbear@virtualtourist.com *

    Check out the Cow-POKES at a RODEO, there are a couple rodeos held in the area Navajo Indian reservation as well as within the City of Page, Arizona. Or visit a local ranch and inquire about being a 'cow-poke' or sheepherder for a day. Check with the local feed company, Andersons Feed & Fence, email iamavt@abearco.com *

    HIKING paths/trails are plentiful, but use established trails and only take pictures/memories with you. Some rocks or plants are protected by law(s).

    Don't forget to watch the SUNSETS. Great photography opportunities. Check-out local talent and their galleries. Look at www.dejolie.com

    Related to:
    • Farm Stay
    • Adventure Travel
    • Family Travel

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Navajo Favorites

  • shiran_d's Profile Photo

    by shiran_d Written Oct 4, 2002

    Favorite thing: If you visit the Four Corners Area, find out what's going on.

    Go see a Pow Wow. The Fair grounds in Bluff are only 1/2 mile from my home. When Bluff holds it's Pow Wow, you can hear the drums beating well into the night.

    Imagine yourself, 150 years ago, listening to the drums.

    What visions does this invoke in your imagination?

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