Page Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Cristian_Uluru
  • Things to Do
    by Cristian_Uluru
  • Things to Do
    by Cristian_Uluru

Most Recent Things to Do in Page

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Page-Rim Trail hike

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 24, 2009

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    View of the rim trail around the city
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    This is an open area that surrounds the whole town, where people can hike the rim and see wonderful sites of the landscape and down into the town proper. Elevation is 4250 feet, so the views are not obstructed, and you can see for 30-40 miles on a clear day. The trail overall is 8 miles. Best views are the north to look over the lake area and the desert. The south is more open and views are of Navajo Reservation terrain. Main access points to the trail are at N. Navajo Drive by the school, or where it crosses Lake Powell Blvd to the northeast side, or two places south off Lake Powell Blvd or Coppermine

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Lake Powell Dam Overlook

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 24, 2009

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    DAm valley
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    There is an overlook area off Hwy 89 that has some fantastic views of the dam and surrounding area. In addition. The short hike of 1/2 mile takes you through some great layered rock formations. The dam is 710 feet high at this point and the base of the concrete is 300 feet. It expands across the canyon 1560 feet. The turn off on Hwy 89 is first right past the Walmart from the east sideand between National Park Service building and Denny's. This is a loop road

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Hanging Gardens-Chains Area

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 24, 2009

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    Gardens in the cove ledge
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    This is a hidden spot that takes you behind the dam wall and to some beautiful scenery and rock formations. The area is just to the est of the bridge about 100 feet for a turn off at the right. Park there, and hike in to the hanging gardens. It is called that because there are green foliage on a lush oasis that is thriving in the desert mesa. They gardens are fed by a little spring by some rock ledge overhang. The hike is about 1 1/2 miles, and some areas may be hard to find the direction, but look for the cairns on the horizons. After about 1/2 mile on the trail take a right up the rock face and climb to the butte. From there, look hard for the cairns to the right that direct to the gardens. You walk over some sand trail for half the distance, and then climb the slide rock face to the top. the gardens continue for quite some way. You could hike further if desired.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Horseshoe Bend

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 24, 2009

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    View looking down to the bend
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    This wonderful view of the Colorado River winding its way around a bend in the rock is worth a short hike. The hike is about one 1/2 mile round trip over sand and steps. The first part of the hike is up a steep side of a sand dune. The overlook views are the reason form the hike. Taking a full panorama picture of the bend is difficult because of being close up to the bend and not able to perch higher for a wider range shot.
    Location is 4 miles to the southeast of Page, off Hwy 89. The Colorado dam is around 8 miles upstream. A sign on the highway directs you to it.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Carl Hayden Visitor Center

    by BruceDunning Written Oct 24, 2009

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    Visitor center on the right
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    This center is across the bridge just on the right going west on Hwy 89 from Page. About 3 miles away from the town center, the views along the visitor center area are good. Tours of the dam inner workings and to see the turbine power generators are offered every hour for a fee of $5. I did not have time, otherwise the tour would be informative. You need a reservation at most times since only 20 people are allowed at once time. The center has a good topo map of the area the lake covers, and also a good exhibit of the evolution of the terrain that one time was a sea bed. The Colorado Plateau rose up over time and created this area into a high desert region.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Lake Powell DAm Power-Information

    by BruceDunning Updated Oct 24, 2009

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    Lake expands way up to the north
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    The dam is at the near north of the town of Page. It is the nucleus of activity and recreation for the town, both the serve locals and tourists. The water area behind the dam is extremely long. It is 186 miles long and very narrow. Depths go to 500 feet. There is 1960 miles of shoreline. There are 96 side canyons that can be explored on the lake perimeter, and there are two main recreation areas to boat, or relax.
    The dam is 710 feet deep at its highest point and 1,560 feet across. It took 400,00 buckets of concrete, or 10 million tons of concrete. The dam itself is 25 feet thick at the top part and 300 feet thick at the base. The height at the peak form the Colorado river floor is 583 feet. It provides power to 650,000 homes, and controls water flow to the downriver areas in Arizona to California.
    Environmentally it may not be too successful. There has been talk to blow up the dam and let the river flow naturally. There are 1 million gallons of water wasted that leach into the rock formations annually and that cannot be used for power generation then. There are many risks discussed with the dam and sediment is filling the upstream section with great vigor. Eventually that gets to the dam base itself-80-100 years estimate.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Glenn Canyon Dam

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 6, 2009

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    View from the damn visitors center
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    The Glen Canyon Dam was completed in 1963 to help control the irregular, seasonal flow of the Colorado River. The dam cost just $273 million to build (cheaper than most professional sports venues) and is being repaid by the electricity generated by the dam. The top of the Glen Canyon dam is 587 feet above the river, 1,560 feet long, and 25 feet thick; at the bottom of the dam, it is about 300 feet thick. Eight hydroelectric generators enable it to produce 1,300 MW of electricity, equivalent to an average nuclear plant.

    There is a damn visitors center above the dam near the bridge, but they required an airport-style strip search and *** probe, so I declined. I never knew the threat of terrorism was so high at a visitors center 100 feet or so above above a dam.

    Behind Glen Canyon Dam stands Lake Powell.

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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    Rent a Houseboat for $5000+ a week on Lake Powell

    by jumpingnorman Written Mar 15, 2009

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    Wife a few weeks after giving birth, Lake Powell

    Families, friends and business companies have split up the price tag of $5000- 8,000 for a whole week of fun on a houseboat that can accommodate over a dozen people and sometimes equipped with jetskis! Just imagine how much fun that would be!

    The views are absolutely photogenic and while taking your pictures, enjoy swimming, fishing, scuba diving, snorkeling, water skiing, hiking --- sleep in the boat and do it all over again the next day! The only warning though is to do this during the summer months (June to October) so that the waters are still warm (70 degrees).

    But if you just want to tour the lake though for a few hours, then just go to the Wahweap and Bull Frog marinas of Page, Arizona which offer year-round one to seven hour boat tours.

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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    See Lake Powell - Second Largest Man-Made Lake!

    by jumpingnorman Written Mar 15, 2009

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    Our Brazilian friend at Lake Powell, Arizona

    Page is proud to have this wonderful lake which is partly in Arizona, but mostly in Utah. But sharing the southern part of this man-made lake is enough for 3 million tourists to visit Page annually! The azure waters of the lake set against a backdrop of spectacular mountains and canyons are enough to attract eager swimmers, fishing aficionados, kayak lovers, and snorkeling adventurers who enjoy the clear waters even at 15 feet below.

    The lake has over 2000 miles of shoreline and is the second largest man-made lake, built 17 years and completed in 1980. It was named after John Wesley Powell, a one-armed American Civil War veteran who explored the river via three wooden boats in 1869. He would be happy to see that people are now enjoying this wonderful dam and that his name lives on in history!

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  • Antelope Canyon:more crowded than Tokyo Subway!

    by Schoukroun Written Aug 28, 2008

    My family and I visited Antelope Canyon in August 08 and it was more crowded than the Tokyo subway during rush hours. We visited it in 06 and it was still OK, now, it is so crowded that you cannot take any good photos nor take advantage of this beautiful site. In addition, tour fee went up from $20 in 06 to $32 in 08 !! Antelope Canyon should be named " Cash Cow Canyon!". Stay away and go swim in the Lake Powell !

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  • mafootje's Profile Photo

    Visit the Glenn Canyon Dam...

    by mafootje Updated Aug 18, 2008

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    Top of the dam.
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    Visit the Glenn Canyon Dam it's worth it but also read the tourist trap bit on this page.
    A impressive man made structure. During our first visit to Page i didn't went inside the dam in 2007 we did. Entrance and tour to the dam are free. Unfortunalty not every part of the dam was reachable during our tour because of some technical problems. On the website linked to in this tip they say camera's aren't allowed. As you can see we where allowed to shoot pictures during our visit.

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  • agapotravel's Profile Photo

    Antelope Canyon Tour II

    by agapotravel Written Jun 24, 2008

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    2 sunbeams
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    I just couldn't narrow my pictures down to only 5, so I am making it into more than one tip. You can see sand naturally falling off the ledges while in the canyon, and the guides will throw sand in the air for people to get unique pictures. This may not be the best tour for anyone with breathing problems or anyone that is claustrophobic.

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  • agapotravel's Profile Photo

    Antelope Canyon Tour

    by agapotravel Written Jun 24, 2008

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    Antelope Canyon
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    As I stated before, the only way to see Antelope Canyon is by taking a tour. The Navajo Indians run these tours, and the price is $32/person. It is well worth it. We wanted to go at 11:30 because that is when the ray of sunlight enters the canyon. You meet at 22 South Lake Powell Boulevard for your tour. It is about a 20 minute (VERY bumpy, sandy, windy) ride to the slot canyon.

    This tour is very well organized, and you are encouraged to stay with your guide. My complaint about this tour is that there are too many people. There were about 7 truckloads of 10-15 people each in the canyon while we were in there. It makes you feel a little bit like they are herding cattle. The goal is for everyone to stay in their group so that each group can get pictures without people in them. Our leader was quite feisty. A few members of the group in front of us kept lagging behind; thus making us have less time to take pictures. She finally walked up to them and got right in their picture and wouldn't move. I think they got the picture that they needed to stay with their group.

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  • witness_wannabe's Profile Photo

    Glen Canyon Dam Overlook

    by witness_wannabe Updated Jun 13, 2007

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    The Dam
    1 more image

    The parking is located off the Scenic View Road (the extension of the northern end of the Lake Powell Blvd, past the Route 89. The site is free. What impressed me most was not the view of the dam itself, but, looking to the left, the incredible views of the Colorado River, winding below some steep rocky cliffs. No picture can proprely render this outstanding view!

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  • witness_wannabe's Profile Photo

    Lake Powell Update

    by witness_wannabe Updated Jun 13, 2007

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    A big disappointment, if you came here to swim! Allegedly "full of sandy beaches" but where are they? The Lake area is either a state park or Native lands and you would have to PAY to get anywhere! One place you could go down the rocks and potentially take a free swim is the place called the Chains (going north on the R 89, turn right before reachiching the bridge over the Colorado River, next to the Glen Canyon Dam and follow to the parking lot.

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Page Things to Do

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