Hiking/Biking, Sedona

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  • Hiking/Biking
    by blueskyjohn
  • Hiking/Biking
    by blueskyjohn
  • Hiking/Biking
    by blueskyjohn
  • joiwatani's Profile Photo

    Moderate Trail 2: The Girdner (4 miles one way)

    by joiwatani Written May 3, 2009

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    This second moderate trail is about 4 miles walk one way. So, you are looking at walking 8 miles really.

    The trail starts by the ramada at the ack of the parking lot at the end of Cultural Park Way.

    The hike crosses several times to a dried creek bed, so make sure to have comfortable walking or hiking shoes. The hike to the Girdner is worth it because of the great views of the red rocks.

    Again, as I write on all my tips on hiking, make sure to hike with a friend or if you are hiking alone, tell a friend where you are going just in case there is an emergency or an accident. Also, bring water and some first aid kit.

    Always put on sunscreen and a hat.

    Carry a backpack to put your snack or food, toilet paper, plastic bag, flashlight, compass, map, rescue whistle, pocket knife, etc.

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    The Moderate Trail 1: Jordan Trail

    by joiwatani Written May 3, 2009

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    If you are a good hiker, then Sedona is your place. Sedona has so many hiking and biking trails.

    The Jordan Trail is considered one of the moderate trails because you have to climb about 200 feet and walk about 2 miles one way.

    The view of the red rock is spectacular. The Jordan Trail can be accessed from the end of the Jordan Road.

    Make sure to get your map at any Sedona's Visitor Information Center. Also, bring your water. Always hike with a friend and if hiking by yourself, make sure to let someone know where you are heading.

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    Easy Trail 6: Jim Thompson Trail

    by joiwatani Written May 2, 2009

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    Out of the six easy trails, this trail is considered as the most historic one as this is the oldest among the trails.

    This trail is about 2.4 miles one way. It has great views of Sedona and Oak Creek.

    You can access this trail from the end of Jordan Road in Uptown Sedona.

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    Easy Trail 5: Sedona Centennial Trail

    by joiwatani Written May 2, 2009

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    My daughter Shelby is a great hiker!

    This is the easiest trail because it is only 1/3 of a mile one way. It's not that bad at all. This is for families with little children like me!

    The trail is paved, and the trail is wide. It has great scenic vistas, too. Make sure to bring your cameras as this is an excellent place to take great pictures of the Red Rocks.

    The views inlcude the Mingus Mountain, Red Rock Secret Mountain Wilderness (it's not a secret anymore) and Sedona.

    The trail begins by the ramada at the back of the dirt parking lot at the end of Cultural Park Way.

    When heading to this trail, make sure to bring water, put sunscreen on and wear a hat. Make sure that your children wear comfortable walking shoes and have snacks on the way. Always make sure to let them know not to throw their trash on the trail.

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    Easy Trail 4: Wilson Canyon Trail

    by joiwatani Written May 2, 2009

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    The Wilson Canyon Trail is one of the best place to hike if you are a photographer. You can have excellent views of the red rocks in Sedona! (Of course there are many places to take other great photography of the Red Rocks like on top of the Holy Cross Chapel and at the view deck of the restaurant at the Sedona Center).

    The Wilson Canyon Trail is about 1.5 miles one way. Trail begins at the picnic ramada in the parking lot at Midgley Bridge and proceeds into wilderness. There are partial shades of shrub oak and Arizona cypress.

    Again, make sure to bring water to avoid dehydration. And, always have a partner or a friend when hiking. Tell someone where you are going. Stay on the trail and always bring your map.

    Wear a hat and sunscreen. I was only there for one day and when I got back home, I was badly burnt!!!

    Make sure to wear your comfortable walking or hiking shoes.

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    Easy Trail 3: Baldwin Loop

    by joiwatani Written May 2, 2009

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    This is the third easy trail named Baldwin Loop. It is about a two mile loop with access to Oak Creek, Templeton Train and the Cathedral Rock Trail.

    Starts 1/4 mile south of the Turkey Creek Trail turnoff on Verde Valley School Road. Trail terminates near the end of Verde Valley School Road, across from the parking lot.

    Make sure that you wear hat and sunscreen and have good pair of walking shoes. Again, pack all your necessary things that you need like a map, lots of water.

    Not matter what time of year, hikers must carry water. One gallon per day per person is recommended.

    Dehydration is one of the biggest dangers of hinking in Red Rock Coutnry. Bring trail mix or snacks, even for short hikes.

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    Easy Trail 2: Marg Draw

    by joiwatani Written May 2, 2009

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    This is the second trail that is considered by the Forest Services that is an easy trail - good for hiking. They name it as Marg Draw.

    (Please get a map from the Sedona's Information Center on the three different locations).

    This trail is about 2 miles only one way. Easy access to Munds Mountain Wilderness. Trailhead on Smbart Lane, off Highway 179.

    This is a suggested hike by the National Forest Services.

    Make sure to carry water. Wear hat and sunscreen. Wear hiking boots or good walking shoes. And carry a first aid kit, map, toilet paper and plastic bag, rescue whistle, pocket knife and extra food.

    When you bring you dog, make sure that it has a leash and clean up after your pet.

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    Easy trail 1: Bell Rock Pathway

    by joiwatani Written May 2, 2009

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    There are about five easy trails in Sedona. This is actually written on the maps given freely by the Sedona Visitor's Information Center.

    One of the five easy trails is the Bell Rock Pathway. It is about 3.5 miles one way. It is smoth, wide trail open to bicycles and hikers that parallels Highway 179.
    Two traihealds, milepost 309.4 (Little Horse Trailhead) and 307.5 (Bell Rock Vista Trailhead).

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    Historic Munds Wagon Trail

    by Yaqui Written Apr 12, 2009

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    This is an actual historic trail. This trail was used by Munds Wagons linking Sedona and Flagstaff.

    Munds Wagon Trail (Moderate) (4 miles one way)
    This trail climbs gradually 1,100 feet and parallels Bear Wallow Canyon and Schnebly Hill Road. Passes by large slick rock areas, cypress and cottonwood trees, and portions of the historic Munds Wagon Trails, the first road linking Sedona and Flagstaff. Open to horse bike and foot use. Park at Huckaby Trailhead approx. 1 mile up Schnebly Hill Road where the pavement ends.

    Red Rock Passes
    Are essential to this area and by purchasing a pass you help maintain and protect this beautiful area. The revenue from the passes helps provide information, education and natural resource protection.
    Daily Red Rock Pass $5
    Weekly Pass (7 days) $15
    Annual Passes $20

    Yet, these passes are not valid for Forrest Service camp grounds, state parks or national monuments.

    .

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    Huckaby & Margs Draw Trail

    by Yaqui Written Apr 12, 2009

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    We hiked this about half way and it was beautiful. Huckaby and (Moderate Trail) (2.9 Miles one way)
    Overlooking Sedona and access to Oak Creek, this begins from Midgely Bridge or Schnebly Hill Road Trailhead.

    Margs Draws Trail (Easy) (1.7 Mile one way)
    Trailhead on Sombart Lane, off Hwy 179.

    Red Rock Passes
    Are essential to this area and by purchasing a pass you help maintain and protect this beautiful area. The revenue from the passes helps provide information, education and natural resource protection.
    Daily Red Rock Pass $5
    Weekly Pass (7 days) $15
    Annual Passes $20

    Yet, these passes are not valid for Forrest Service camp grounds, state parks or national monuments.

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    Bell Rock Pathway Trail

    by Yaqui Written Apr 12, 2009

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    We stopped and hiked a couple of times while we were visiting. My sister and sons loved to hike, so we took advantage of our precious family time. This path allowed a perfect spot to take photographs of Bell Rock. Make sure you purchase a Red Rock Pass since it helps preseves these parks and trails for all of us to enjoy!

    We hiked the Bell Rock Pathway:
    (Easy Trail) (3.5 mile one way) Smooth trail that is has a wide trail open to bicycles and hikers that parallels Hwy 179. They are two trailheads, milepost 309.4 Little Horse Trailhead and 307.5 Bell Rock Vista Trailhead.

    Also another trail nearby is the Little Horse Trail (Moderate to Strenuous) (1.6 Mile one way)
    Single track climb to Chicken Point through pinyon and cypress forest. Some steep, rocky climbs. Access from Little Horse Trailhead on Highway 179. Links with Broken Arrow and Mystic Trails for extended loop.

    Red Rock Passes
    Are essential to this area and by purchasing a pass you help maintain and protect this beautiful area. The revenue from the passes helps provide information, education and natural resource protection.
    Daily Red Rock Pass $5
    Weekly Pass (7 days) $15
    Annual Passes $20

    Yet, these passes are not valid for Forrest Service camp grounds, state parks or national monuments.

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    Local Plant Life to Respect

    by Yaqui Written Apr 18, 2008

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    Cane Cholla
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    This is Cane Cholla (Opuntia spinosior) This cacti is a plant you don't want to be upfront and personal with. It is a very common plant in this area. So when you are hiking, climbing or just generally strolling around. Please be careful. It actually looks very soft in texture, but those spines are a good indication it is not. Javilians are a wild pig that love to snack on fruit this plant produces during March, called Cactus Moom. The native people used them in a boiled stew. They are supposely have a butter flavor and boiled with squash and baked in a pit.

    Desert Prickly Pear (Cactaceae) A very common Prickly Pear locally, fruits are edible and very sweet, used to make jellies and candy. The fruit's juice can be used as a bright red dye. If you notice bites taken from the pads that is usually the work of Javelina.

    Banana Yucca (Yucca baccata) A very common yucca in our area - sharp points at the ends of leaves, leaf edges with curled fibers. Fruits are edible, and the plant was an important food source for indigenous people.

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  • Cathedral Rock platform on a full moon!

    by anjarina Written Oct 4, 2005

    Park in the little parking space to the climb up to the platform beneath the spires on the left a little ways down "Back O' Beyond " road. Take a sweatshirt with you and be aware of javelina near the bottom of the climb (a sometimes wet riverbed) ...The platform is the most excellant place to view a full moon! Shadows of the surrounding red rocks are hauntingly beautiful!

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    Call of the Canyon Trail

    by JohnnoBSCW Written Jun 10, 2005

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    This is a really nice hiking trail - not too hard but not too easy either. Wanders through the canyons, nice and cool on a hot day. If you keep going youll end up in some rock canyons - long hike but great fun. To find the trailhead go just a bit further than you would expect .... see the link for directions ...

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    West fork Hiking Trail

    by goingsolo Written May 4, 2004

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    creek along west fork trail

    West Fork is one of Sedona's most popular hiking trails. The early part of the hike is a sandy stroll amidst ferns and through an abandoned grove of apple, pear, and plum trees. You'll reach the ruins of an old lodge and then turn right through them into the beautifully forested canyon that is literally the west fork of Oak Creek.
    You'll rock hop across the creek many times during this hike but there are almost always stones laid out to form a natural bridge so even if you're not an experienced hiker you should have little difficulty.
    The path is wide black dirt that takes you past ancient ponderosa pines, maples, oaks, ferns, reeds, all manner of wildflowers, and other vegetation.
    A little over one mile into the trail you can rest in a natural jaccuzi spot during the summer, or take a dip in one of the deeper areas of the creek.
    Hike back farther and the trail becomes a little narrower as you walk through reeds and then climb up along a ledge in the forest above the creek. At the three mile mark you go down again and reach an area where you must either stop and turn around or go hiking through the water as the red rock walls of the canyon curve overhead.

    From Phoenix, take I-17 north to Hwy 179 (exit 298). Turn left onto 179 and follow it past the Village of Oak Creek to the Sedona (Burger King) "Y". Turn right at the "Y" onto North 89A.

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