Supai Travel Guide

  • Supai
    by Segolily
  • Supai
    by Segolily
  • Supai
    by Segolily

Supai Things to Do

  • Mooney Falls

    On this trip, I chose to only go as far as Mooney Falls because I was only there for the day and I wasn't sure how much more hiking I could take. Mooney Falls was not as striking as Havasu Falls in my opinion but was much taller. Mooney Falls was named for a miner from the old west that died after a fall while trying to climb to the cliff above. I...

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  • Havasu Falls

    At first, the top of the falls looks just like any other cliff top. That is until you step closer to the sign that says "NO DIVING FROM THIS POINT". Once you reach that spot and look down, there you see the waterfall. A walk over to the right will take you to the top of the waterfall. To the left is a trail that takes you to the bottom of the...

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  • Havasu Falls

    Havasu Canyon is magical if you can hike to Havasu Falls. I took a week long raft trip down the canyon, and we hiked up from the river to the falls. When I was there you could swim up under the falls to a hidden cave. The travertine landscape of the falls and pools gets changed by occasional flash floods.

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  • Enjoy the wildflowers and wildlife

    We were hiking in mid October and were surprised to see so many desert flowers in bloom. We also noticed many small desert lizards and birds. From the parking lot we saw a black tailed fox with a fresh kill in its mouth.Keep your eyes open and your camera ready.

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  • Swim under the Falls

    Although we were quite hot by the end of our hike, we found the water temperature in October a bit too chilly for our liking, so unfortunately we didn't get to swim. However, many brave souls did and you can swim all the way out to Havasu Falls and swim underneath it if you like.I suggest you bring water shoes or Tevas with you as will have to wade...

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  • Mooney Falls

    This waterfall is twice the height of Havasu Falls and also crashes into a beautiful turqoise coloured pool surrounded by red cliffs. Your first sight of this 200 foot waterfall will be from the top, after a one mile hike from Havasu Falls.You can continue on the path which descends the cliff side along a series of steps, through caves and by...

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  • HIke along Havasu Creek

    From Havasu Falls you have another one mile hike before reaching Mooney Falls. It is a very pleasant, level walk that will bring you through the shady campground and alongside the quiet blue waters of Havasu Creek.

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  • Havasu Falls

    The hike was very rewarding and perhaps a bit tiring, but from the village it is still another 2 miles to Havasu Falls. Follow the path to the left of the church and keep to the right when you come to a fork in the road. This is also the path that leads to the campgrounds. The path will be a bit sandy in places and there will be some hills, but it...

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  • The Watchmen

    The last mile of the hike will bring you alongside Havasu Creek, you will hear it before you will see it. You will also be walking under a shady canopy of trees. After crossing the aqua blue water by a small footbridge, you will soon see the first homes of the village and nearby the two towering rock formations, called the Watchmen.

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  • Hiking to Supai Part 3

    The next 6 miles of the hike will bring you deeper into the canyon where the open vistas are lost and you are walking between the soaring orange cliff sides of the Grand Canyon. The colours and rock formations were quite beautiful and we enjoyed these views as much as the views from the top.You can see more views from the hike in my travelogue.

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  • Hiking to Supai Part 2

    Once you have completed the first mile downhill, you will be on the canyon floor and the path will veer to the right. Now you will have great closeup views of the colourful canyon walls and some open vistas looking east and west into the Canyon. It will be like this for the next mile. The path is well travelled and easy to follow. If you are ever...

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  • Hiking to Supai

    The only way into Supai is by helicopter, mule or your own two feet. The hike is 8 miles and apart from the first mile, it is fairly level and easy. However, in that first mile, you will descend over 1000 feet by a series of switchbacks down the canyon side. It took us 4 hours to hike the 8 miles to the village, but we stopped often for photos,...

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  • Hualapai Hilltop

    If you are planning to hike down to Supai, you "must see" Hualapai Hilltop, for this is where you will park your car. It was a large and secure parking area, free of charge. Some hikers spend the night here in the parking lot before beginning the hike down in the morning. There is also a port-a-john, the last such facility you will encounter before...

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  • The only way to go is down

    To get to Mooney Falls, Beaver Falls, and Ferngrado you must scale the cliffs beside Mooney Falls. Fortunately there are chains to hold onto. My hands were shaking the first time down, but after that I climbed up and down it daily with the greatest of ease and skill.

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  • HIke to the Rim at Night

    You will never see more stars in your entire life! Ask the locals for the best path to the rim. Be prepared to spend another 2-3 hours making your up the cliff. The best time for this activity is at sunset.

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Supai Hotels

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Supai Transportation

  • Hiking, Horseback or Helicopter

    To get to the village by hiking or by horseback is a 1.5 mile hike down the canyon and then a 4 or 5 mile trek over the sand and jagged rocks of a dry creek bed. The amazing blue-green waterfalls are another 2 miles or so beyond the Supai. The only way in and out of the canyon to Supai is by hiking, by horseback, or by taking a helicopter ride...

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  • Fuel up in Peach Springs

    Hualupi Hilltop is accessible by car.Directions to Supai: To get to Supai, you go East on I40 from California. Take the Seligman exit (also called old Route 66) North toward Peach Springs. This is your last chance for gas. 37 miles from the Seligman exit is Indian Road 18 turning only to the right. Drive on the paved road for 64 miles until you...

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  • Supai Hotels

    2 Hotels in Supai

    88 Reviews and Opinions

Supai Local Customs

  • Supai Overview

    Supai is inhabited by approximately 450 people from the Havasupai (people of the blue green water) tribe. The village contains several small homes, 3 churches, a school, a medical center, 2 stores, a cafe, a post office and a tourist center. The mail and supplies are still delivered mostly by horseback. The cafe food was adaquate and reasonably...

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  • The Village of Supai

    There are about 250 members of the Havasupai Tribe who live here. This small agricultural tribe was present before the first European explorers arrived in 1540.In the village you will find a general store and a cafe, one lodge and a church amongst the local homes. There is also a post office here from which you can mail a postcard that will be...

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  • Respect and Protect

    You must pack in and out all of your supplies. DO NOT leave any trash behind. There are one or two outhouses for the entire campsite. It is only acceptable to relieve yourself a minimum of 25 feet from the river.

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Supai Warnings and Dangers

  • Come Prepared and be Alert

    Hualapai Hilltop is the starting point for anyone that wishes to get to Supai and the waterfalls by foot or by horseback. It is a large parking lot on the top of the west side of the Grand Canyon. From the hilltop you can get a great view of the trail down the canyon which leads you on the 6 mile path to Supai. The initial mile or so is steep,...

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  • Watch out for the Mule Trains!

    While on your hike to or from Supai, you must always be on the alert for passing mule trains. Sometimes they come running down the path and will appear suddenly from around a corner. Luckily, they also make quite a bit of noise, so keep your ears open and if you happen to hear something like thunder approaching, step aside and wait for all the...

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  • Watch Your Step

    There are countless ways to get injured while downin the canyons. Play it safe and remember that if you become injured it will take hours for help to reach you. Always carry a first aid kit and plenty of drinkable water.

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Supai What to Pack

  • Pack light! Because YOU'll be carrying...

    small backpack comfortable hiking shoeswater shoes or tevas for exploring the waterfallsas few clothes as possiblerain poncho, just in case just the bare necessities for overnightmole skin in case of blisters I carried all of my film for the entire holiday with me because I didn't want to leave any to overheat in the parked car. swimsuit for a...

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  • Less is More

    Get fitted for a pack if you haven't already. Comfort is key to your enjoyment. When you pack your gear place heavier items on the bottom. DO NOT WEAR NEW HIKING BOOTS! You will need sturdy shoes for the hike, especially boots with solid ankle support. Bring a poncho or plastic garbage bags in case of an unexpected couldburst. Make sure to bring a...

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Supai Off The Beaten Path

  • jenn_d's Profile Photo
    Geronimo!!!

    by jenn_d Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you explore enough, you are certain to have an area all to yourself. My friends and I erected a rope swing which provided hours of entertainment.

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Supai Favorites

  • jenn_d's Profile Photo
    Havasu Falls

    by jenn_d Updated Mar 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The best time to vist Supai is during the month of May. Go too soon and you may see some flash floods, after October the water is FREEZING cold! Temperatures in the summer months soar into the hundreds. The hike in to the reservation is a solid 11 miles. Count on another 2 1/2 to reach the camp grounds. Hiking in is the EASY part...because it is entirely downhill. Hiking out is absolute hell because it is entirely uphill. Each year I do this hike I swear it is the last time, but something keeps me coming back time and time again. i will never forget the faces of the weary travelers I encountered on my way down. They all ask the same question of me. "How much farther?" I always tell the truth..remebering the hikes where incoming campers gazed at me sympathetically and lied through their teeth "Oh, it is just around the corner" they would say. HA!

    Fondest memory: The first time I viewed Havasu Falls I had to pinch myself. Could such a place exist? The coolest thing is scaling the rocks aside the falls to discover a little nesting area safely behind the falls. In my younger years I eagerly dove through the falls with my friends. The force of the water pushed me down and then spit me out to the surface. Absolutely exhilerating!

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    • Hiking and Walking

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