Unique Places in Tucson

  • Tombstone
    Tombstone
    by Martinewezel
  • Biosphere, 40 miles from Tucscon downtown, AZ
    Biosphere, 40 miles from Tucscon...
    by jumpingnorman
  • Biosphere, 40 miles from Tucscon downtown, AZ
    Biosphere, 40 miles from Tucscon...
    by jumpingnorman

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Tucson

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    Marist College 1915

    by Yaqui Updated Oct 22, 2011

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    Marist College was built in 1915 as a boys Catholic school and was part of the major compound of Our Lady Chapel and Hall. It is of Italian Renaissance and Spanish Colonial Revival style and is made from mud adobe construction. The Marist Brothers, a Catholic religious order, was founded in France by Saint Marcellin Champagnat in the early 1817s to focus on educational work throughout the world. In 1914, Granjon invited Brothers Gosbertus, Gregorius, Louis Casimir, and Henri Fumeaux, four Marist Brothers from Mexico and Texas, to come to Tucson to learn English and study the American educational system. It was converted into office space for St. Augustine Cathedral. It has suffered major water damage, but now you can tell from the picture, it is being saved, and is a registered landmark of the City of Tucson.

    192 S. Stone Ave. Tucson, AZ 85701

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    Old Pueblo Club 1907

    by Yaqui Written Oct 22, 2011

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    Built in 1907 as a Gentlemen's Club where all the wealthy men could socialize. It had it's own gym, bowling alley, billiards rooms, library, restaurant, rooftop garden and 15 permanent residence quarters. Designed by architect, D.H. Holmes, the building was the first in Tucson with a façade of buff-colored, California- pressed brick. I appreciate all the details that were added to these buildings of its day. Wish they did that again. Part of the Armory Park District.

    101 South Stone Avenue & Jackson Street.
    Tucson, Az

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    Bank One Building 1929

    by Yaqui Written Oct 22, 2011

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    This beautiful building was built in 1929 and was Tucson first skyscraper. From 1935-1990's it was known as the Valley National Bank. Today it serves as part of the Chase Bank Corporation. It really stands out with lots of lovely details.

    Bank One Building
    2 East Congress Street
    Tucson, AZ 85701

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    ICBM Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum

    by PeterVancouver Updated Apr 4, 2011

    About 20 miles south of Tucson, way out in the desert in Green Valley, you can find the only ICBM site open to the public in the USA. Naturally it is pretty inconspicuous and it still holds a Titan 11 110' tall rocket which obviously is now decommissioned, but seems menacing none the less. After seeing a film on the rocket and its potential, you travel deep down in the bunker where observation windows enable you to view the ICBM in its silo and through massive blast proof doors, visit the control room.
    To get there take I-19 south to exit 69 and head west for about half a mile until you see the signs on the right. The Titan Missile Museum

    Looking into the silo on to Titan 11
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    Tumacacori National Historic Park

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This monument is located 46 miles south of Tucson on Interstate 19, and 20 miles north of Nogales. Self-guided walks take you through the remains of this mission, originally founded by Jesuit missionary, Padre Kino. While visiting here we looked at the remains of San Jose de Tumacacori mission as well as a small cemetery with a cylindrical mortuary chapel, a grain/food storage area, and a few other ruins. There is also a visitor center with a small museum. The church began in 1800, with the final stage beginning in 1823, even so it was never completed. This mission served the Pima Indians and their dwellings were at one time within a walled area along with the church. Due to the Apache attacks and one of the coldest winters on record in 1848, this mission was abandoned. The remaining residents moved north to San Xavier. The mission was very interesting even though it is a ruin, rather than a well maintained, still used chapel. It had a lot of character and we enjoyed it more than we had expected. I would recommend you plan to spend at least an hour when visiting the historic park. It is open daily 8:00 to 5:00 except Thanksgiving and Dec. 25. Admission is $2.00 per person with free admission to children under age 17, or $4.00 per family. . To get to Tumacacori drive Interstate 19 south from Tucson, 45 miles to the Tumacacori marked exit.

    Tumacacori Mission
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    Public Access Television

    by bottleofdoom Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you're stuck in your hotel room & it has cable, check out channels 72,73 & 74 or 97, 98 & 99. What better way to get a sample of Tucson people than to watch them on TV. Especially late night & weekends, there are some strange programs to be amazed by.

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    Charming hilsside houses of Bisbee, Arizona

    by jumpingnorman Updated May 27, 2009

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    Just 82 miles (132 km) southeast of Tucson, Bisbee is a charming nice town filled with Victorian and European-style homes perched miraculously on the hillsides, a lot of them unreachable by car. It was also a bit tricky for us going through the narrow streets and you wonder whether 2 cars will fit...or is it just one way? Fortunately, there were not too many cars driving around.

    You will enjoy going through its many specialty shops, gourmet restaurants and bookstores.

    In the May-June 2000, it was noted to be the most 'alive' places to retire in the U.S, and it was also a runner-up as one of the "quirkiest" towns in America. There is a test of physical endurance called The 1000-Stair Climb which is a five kilometer run through Bisbee that goes up and down 1,034 stairs! You think you can do that? The event has also grown to include the Ice Man Competition, designed to honor the history of men delivering blocks of ice by hand before the advent of refrigeration- the contestants race up 153 steps carrying an eight-pound block of ice with antique ice tongs! Now that one I cannot do!

    Other interesting things in Bisbee include Copper Queen Mine , Phelps Dodge General Office Building (now the Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum), The Lavender Pit which is an inactive open pit mine site in the center of the city, Warren Ballpark built in 1909 and The Thomas Ranch from 1902 swhen Bisbee was inaugurated.

    Bisbee Visitor Center
    #2 Copper Queen Plaza/Convention Center
    PO Box 1642, Bisbee, AZ 85603
    Ph: 520-432-3554 or 866-2BISBEE

    Bisbee, Arizona - 82 miles southeast of Tucson Bisbee, Arizona - 82 miles southeast of Tucson Bisbee, Arizona - 82 miles southeast of Tucson Bisbee, Arizona - 82 miles southeast of Tucson Bisbee, Arizona - 82 miles southeast of Tucson
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    Zia Records

    by bottleofdoom Updated Mar 12, 2006

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    Zia Records is the 'chain' store, but they have their merits too. Not as bad as a Sam Goody or anything. There's a good mix of indie and corporate labels. They have used cd's too, but very limited vinyl. Zines and accessories as well. 2 locations: 3655 N. Oracle Rd., 3370 E. Speedway Blvd.

    (This is where I work now)

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    the rincons and mescal

    by bocmaxima Written Nov 9, 2005

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    The quickest way to get to Rincon Peak though hiking is via Mescal Road. Take I-10 southeast of Tucson to the J-Six/Mescal Road exit. Turn left (north) and follow the road past the movie facade town of Mescal until the road becomes dirt. This will wind into the hills, and becomes very narrow and bumpy. The portion past Ash Creek (which normally is flowing) is probably not best for passenger cars, but it can be done. This road takes you into some VERY desolate country, and eventually forks. Both ways take you to trailheads (Miller Canyon on the left, Turkey Canyon on the right) which lead into the Rincon Wilderness and towards Rincon Peak. A little north of this is also the Little Rincons, which are hidden by the surrounding mountains. These consist of rolling, green hills lined with mesquites. They are barely visible at hilltops of Mescal Road, and only a few miles down the hiking trails at the end of the road.
    Mescal, like Old Tucson Studios, is a Western facade town. This is a working movie studio, so although it was opened to tours just a couple of years ago, it's also often closed for filming. The tours can be pre-arranged and are $6/person booked through Old Tucson Studios (http://www.oldtucson.com/groups_tours/coach_tours/coach_tours.htm). Walk-up tours are available on certain days (check the above web site for a schedule).

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    redington pass and the rincons

    by bocmaxima Written Nov 9, 2005

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    The Rincons Mountains could be considered the younger, overlooked cousin of the Catalinas. This is not to say that they're any younger in geologic age, but rather they're slightly smaller and less dramatic, but are much more isolated and desolate.
    There are three ways into the Rincons:
    The best way is to hike. The Douglas Spring Trail, starting from the end of Speedway Boulevard, takes you into the beautiful yucca-lined grassland representing the foothills of the Rincons. After about 6.5 miles, you hit the Douglas Spring campground and have the chance to continue to Rincon Peak. This a really nice trail to do as a long day hike (going all the way to the peak is an overnighter) and is not very crowded past two or three miles. Keep in mind that there is no water on the trail, except what you may find in the creeks.
    You can also drive in on two different roads.
    Redington Road starts paved from the end of Tanque Verde Road on the far eastern side of town past the horse ranches and cactus nurseries. It quickly becomes a windy, narrow, gravel and dirt road. Once you pass the more popular Tanque Verde Falls parking lots, you're in a very desolate part of the Rincons. You'll see ATVers, horseback riders, hunters and people just out there to shoot, but they'll taper off the further you go. At about 12 miles, you hit the Italian Spring and Arizona Trail. If you head south, you will eventually meet the Douglas Spring Trail mentioned above and can gain access into the heart of the Rincons. The road eventually heads back down into the desert and hits San Pedro Road at the village of Redington.

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    san pedro valley

    by bocmaxima Written Nov 9, 2005

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    Tucson's natural barriers have created several areas where development has more or less failed to reach. One such area is the San Pedro Valley, on the east side of the Rincon Mountains.
    The San Pedro River runs straight north from Mexico, dumping into the Gila River near Winkelman. Along its course through the area, it provides a dramatic riparian contrast to the surrounding desert.
    The western cottonwoods (alamos) along its banks give a real sense of fall around December when the leaves begin to change. This can be seen most dramatically around the ghost town of Fairbank (Highway 82 between Sonoita and Tombstone) and Charleston (Charleston Road between Sierra Vista and Tombstone).
    Closer to Tucson, the San Pedro Valley is a strip of ranches, homesteads and small farms. The villages of Redington and Cascabel are here, with a group of a few rugged Arizonans calling it home.
    The main road in can be accessed from Highway 77 and San Manuel, or Pomerene Road off of I-10 near Benson. The road is mostly is gravel, but is wide, graded and easily passable by passenger cars. The alternative route is to take Redington Road (what Tanque Verde Road becomes) over the Rincons. Redington Road is very narrow and curvy at times, and is sometimes very bumpy and difficult for passenger cars. It can also take over an hour to get from the end of the pavement to San Pedro Road. It's a beautiful, desolate drive though, and a stark contrast to the typically more crowded forest areas of the Catalinas.

    Fall colors in the valley east of Tucson The land just above the riparian river is desert Old Charleston Road bridge over San Pedro Looking at the river from the Charleston bridge

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    The San Xavier del Bac Mission

    by keida84 Written May 12, 2005

    A jewel in the desert, a visit to this Mission will not disappoint.

    The San Xavier del Bac Mission is located just off of Interstate-19 at Exit 92, on the San Xavier Indian Reservation, 6 miles south of Interstate-10 in Tucson. It is one of the oldest and most well preserved missions in the southwest.

    The present church was built from 1783 - 1797 by the Franciscan Fathers Juan Bautista Velderrain and Juan Bautista Llorenz. Little is know about the actual labor of the construction of the church, who was the architect, who were the artisans, but many believe it was the Tohono O'odham who fufilled these roles.

    The church is a series of domes and arches that create enclaves for themes of painting on the various walls, domes and rooms. The area behind the high altar is a dazzling gilt of colors. The wall paintings are all original.

    The east tower was never completed. Several theories exist about why it was left unfinished. It is not known if the church's 7,000 peso loan was not enough, or if the priests decided not to finish it so that no taxes would have to be paid. Another theory says that a worker was killed during construction and no one else could be convinced to go up.

    The church is open 365 days a year and is a working catholic church.

    The Mission
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    PIMA AIR MUSEUM

    by zuriga Updated Mar 15, 2005

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    Tucson is home to Davis-Monthan Airbase and its boneyard is available for tours. One can also visit the Pima Air Museum from 9-5. The most famous aircraft in history are on display.

    AIRPLANES
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    REID PARK ZOO

    by zuriga Updated Mar 15, 2005

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    Reid Park Zoo is a lovely place, especially for children. The animals seem happy in environments that replicate their real place of origin. Here are a few strange looking ducks with red beaks.

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    Campbell Cliffs Luxury Home

    by ATXtraveler Written Aug 25, 2004

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    What would you do if you had a spare 17.5 Million Dollars? How about spend 10 years building the ultimate dream house?

    That is exactly what I learned happened to a gentleman that I met on the golf course here in Tucson.

    For the safety of his privacy, I will keep his name out of this, but trust me... you would be very impressed by this property.

    If you have that kind of money, visit his website. If you are going to buy it... call me... I would love the finder's fee.

    Campbell Cliffs

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