Tuzigoot National Monument Things to Do

  • Inside the Tuzigoot ramparts.
    Inside the Tuzigoot ramparts.
    by razorbacker
  • Tuzigoot Sinagua pueblo.
    Tuzigoot Sinagua pueblo.
    by razorbacker
  • Museum artifacts.
    Museum artifacts.
    by razorbacker

Best Rated Things to Do in Tuzigoot National Monument

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Tuzigoot National Monument

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    Tuzigoot is Apache for crooked water. They were a prehistoric people called the Sinagua who built these pueblos and lived in them from around 1125 and 1400 CE. They benefitted from farming, good source of water, and trade. They were accomplished in sculpting stones and jewelry making. Many wonderful pieces have been discovered from excavation. This pueblo is one the most preserved structures and probably housed as many to 77 and 110 rooms. This structure has been preserved by beefing up the walls with new mortar. What I find so special about this structure is you can actually walk around it, touch it and explore the top floor of the pueblo. By actually seeing it in person gives a small glimpse in the everyday life of such wonderful people rich in culture.

    $5.00 - 7 Days
    $8.00 Tuzigoot and Montezuma Castle National Monuments - 7 Days

    Tuzigoot National Monument is open From Memorial Day through Labor Day 8 AM- 6 PM
    From Labor Day through Memorial Day 8 AM -5 PM

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Tuzigoot Vistor Center

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    This vistor center was build around the 1935 like a pueblo with local natural materials to compliment the monument. Franklin D. Roosevelt designated the ruins as a U.S. National Monument on July 25, 1939. After a extensive excavation was performed back in the 1934 discovered many wonderful artifacts that are still on display at this wonderful center. Plenty of materials on displays and a small gift shop. Lots of shade during the hot summer months and restrooms available.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the fuana

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cane Cholla
    3 more images

    This is Cane Cholla (Opuntia spinosior) This cacti is a plant you don't want to be upfront and personal with. It is a very common plant in this area. So when you are hiking, climbing or just generally strolling around. Please be careful. It actually looks very soft in texture, but those spines are a good indication it is not. Javilians are a wild pig that love to snack on fruit this plant produces during March, called Cactus Moom. The native people used them in a boiled stew. They are supposely have a butter flavor and boild with squash and baked in a pit.

    Desert Prickley Pear (Cactaceae) A very common Prickly Pear locally, fruits are edible and very sweet, used to make jellies and candy. The fruit's juice can be used as a bright red dye. If you notice bites taken from the pads, that is usually the work of Javelina.

    Banana Yucca (Yucca baccata) A very common yucca in our area - sharp points at the ends of leaves, leaf edges with curled fibers. Fruits are edible, and the plant was an important food source for indigenous people

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Views From Tuzigoot

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View towards Clarksdale, Az
    3 more images

    This not alone just a beautiful monument, but the views from the top floor Pueblo afffords you 360 views of the whole surrounds area. Cottonwood, Clarksdale, and you can even see the red rock of Sedona. We stayed here for quiet some time just taking in the beautiful scenery. People seem to think Arizona is nothig but desert landscape, but in reality Arizona has some the lush areas of forrest. Many wonderful camping and recreation areas available. So if you can see this monument, make the time to check out the top floor of the pueblo.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Hands On - Grinding Stones

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Ok, we got the biggest kick out of our son. He waited very patiently to use the grinding stone because some other little girl was playing with it. It is located within an actual room that you can enter and they have corn available to let anyone who wanted to experience this chore from the past. Of course he had to be animated when he was doing it. He made his father and myself just crack up. He is quite the character. So make sure you check out this little find.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jonathan_C's Profile Photo

    imagine life inside an ancient pueblo

    by Jonathan_C Updated Jul 8, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tuzigoot pueblo construction

    Inside the largest dwelling at Tuzigoot you can begin to imagine life inside an ancient pueblo. The cool darkness inside this dwelling is in sharp contrast with the bright sun outside. But remember, the door you entered through didn't exist for the ancient ones. Ceiling holes with ladders provided the only access back then.

    Be sure to visit the National Park Service Museum at Tuzigoot for a complete picture of Sinaguan life.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jonathan_C's Profile Photo

    visit the citadel

    by Jonathan_C Updated Jun 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tuzigoot pueblo

    The literal high point of any visit to Tuzigoot will be a trip to the 'citadel', the reconstructed room from whose roof you can view the surrounding territory. Although various documents I've read say this structure wasn't defensive and there is little evidence of warfare, I'm not so sure. Everything about this structure and its location shout out that Tuzigoot was indeed a castle and that this highest room was the lookout point. Come visit and decide for yourself.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jonathan_C's Profile Photo

    a roof over your head

    by Jonathan_C Updated May 30, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tuzigoot pueblo

    There are many Sinaguan ruins to visit in central Arizona -- Tuzigoot, Montezuma's Castle/Well, Walnut Canyon and Wupatki are the interpreted National Monuments. Of all of them, Tuzigoot gives you the best close up of ancient construction techniques.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    See the Sinagua Ruins at Tuzigoot

    by Basaic Written Feb 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tuzigoot Ruins
    3 more images

    Sometime around 1000 AD the Sinagua people built a large pueblo on the edge of the Verde Valley. They built an agricultural based society here and established hundreds of miles of trade routes with neighboring tribes. The pueblo was two to three stories high and had 110 rooms. The US Park Service established Tuzigoot National Monument to preserve this important historical area. In addition to Tuzigoot, there are Sinagua ruins in Walnut Canyon, Montezuma's Castle and Wupatki nearby. The Sinagua left the area in the 1400s. Many believe they blended in with the Hopi Nation. An easy, paved, interpretive trail leads around the ruins at Tuzigoot. You can enter some of the ruins for a more intimate experience and try to imagine what life was like here in the 1000s.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Visitors Center

    by Basaic Updated Feb 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visitors Center

    Your first stop at Tuzigoot National Monument will be the Visitors Center. Here you can get park brochures and any souvenir needs you may have (like postcards for your VT friends). They also have a pretty nice museum and they can provide any information you need about the park and the surrounding area to make your trip more enjoyable.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Life Inside the Pueblo

    by Basaic Written Feb 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Doorway From Room to Room
    1 more image

    This is the interior of an early room in the pueblo. The room frequently had a hole dug in the corner where the family would keep an earthen jar of drinking water. Entrance was gained by a ladder that descended from a hole in the roof. This hole also provided light and ventilation. If the family had a child that died the body was buried in a stone-lined crypt below the floor of the room in hopes that the soul would be incorporated into future generations and not be lost.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Rooftops

    by Basaic Written Feb 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rooftop
    1 more image

    The rooftops of the rooms were flat and served as additional living space. The breezes and open air of the rooftop must have been welcome during the hot summer months. The rooftops served as places for grinding meal, preparine food for cooking, repairing equipment, and watching for traders or threats to the community.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Additions to Tuzigoot Pueblo

    by Basaic Written Feb 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Addition to Tuzigoot
    1 more image

    The pueblo required constant upkeep to repair damage from weather or time. As the community grew, additions were made to the original pueblo. At its peak, Tuzigoot housed around 225 people. Most of the rooms were for single families and were used for sleeping and eating, however, some of the later rooms had areas for cooking fires and trough shaped stones called Metates along with stones called Manos used for grinding grain were found here.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Plaza Area

    by Basaic Written Feb 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Metates and Manos

    On one side of the Tuzigoot Pueblo is a flat open area that was used as a plaza. This plaza was a gathering area for the vilagers and was used for the preparation of food. In the middle of this plaza you can see more Metate. This area may also have been used for gatherings with other tribes and for religious ceremonies.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Why Did the Sinagua Settle Here?

    by Basaic Updated Feb 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Verde River Valley
    2 more images

    The Sinagua chose this location for the pueblo because it was located near the fertile land of the Verde River Valley. This land was ideal for growing crops and the water from the river also attracted lots of game for hunting. Its location along the river also made it a natural stop for traders moving through the area. Photos 2 and 3 show some of the irrigation canals dug by the Sinagua.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Tuzigoot National Monument

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

126 travelers online now

Comments

Tuzigoot National Monument Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Tuzigoot National Monument things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Tuzigoot National Monument sightseeing.

View all Tuzigoot National Monument hotels