Yuma Off The Beaten Path

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    Postcard of Guard tower
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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Yuma

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    Don't they like flowers?

    by matcrazy1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    FLOWERS

    Hmm... the area of Yuma is dry all the year round and hot at least from May to October. So, there are not many wild flowers there. But there are quite many when people water them.

    Those ones on my picture grew in front of Yuma Visitor Information Center. When I was taking a picture of that red flowers one (local?) women asked me whether I know the name of the flowers and she told me that they were called... I don't remember. Do you know? E-mal me, please.


    From mehunt:
    "In case you're still wondering, I believe the flowers are bougainvilleas"
    Thank you.

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    Colorado River

    by matcrazy1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    COLARADO  RIVER

    The source of the Colorado River is Grand Lake, Colorado, in Rocky Mountain National Park. It flows from Colorado via Utah, then it flows southwards between California and Arizona to Yuma when it enters Mexico. You can see the river just by Yuma Territorial Prison Historic Park.

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    First big cactus in Arizona

    by matcrazy1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    FIRST  CACTUS  IN  ARIZONA

    Cactus, common name for the family comprising a peculiar group of spiny, fleshy plants native to America. The family contains about 1650 species, most of which are adapted to arid climates.
    The first one I could see was located just inside the Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park. Haha, I could see... millions of them later in Arizona.

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    Other Displays

    by Basaic Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Barbershop
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    There are other buildings on site too; like a barbershop and a blacksmith's office. The museum also had one room that had nothing to do with Castle Dome directly, it was in honor of the US Military and thousands of veterams had signed their name and dates of service on the walls. Thanks for the honor, Castle Dome.

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    Gas Station and Cafe

    by Basaic Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Twid's Gas and Cafe
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    One of the later addistions to Castle Dome came after the mines reopened for the mining of lead. This was after the invention of the automobile so the town needed a gas station. The gas station included a small cafe.

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    Mercantile Store

    by Basaic Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Mercantile
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    Castle Dome had a Mercantile Store that sold all the general needs to the populace. There were also rooms off to the side for a doctor, a dentist and the assayer (a guy who analyzed the silver ore and assigned a value to it).

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    Cantina

    by Basaic Updated Feb 13, 2009

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    Cantina
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    The cantinas, in addition to serving drinks, also served food. This is a recreation of one of the cantinas. Although no mention was made of it at the museum, no doubt some of the cantinas also offered some feminine companionship.

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    Bars at Castle Dome

    by Basaic Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Small Bar
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    Castle Dome had 5 bars and cantinas inside a mile. Miners would often come here after work to unwind and relax. The bars were also frequented by cowboys who drove cattle to Castle Dome to feed the miners and other townspeople. The town got rather wild when the miners and cowboys hit the bars at the same time.

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    Digger's Room

    by Basaic Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Digger's Room

    The people who dug the mines would come to work in regular clothes and change into digging clothes in a room like this one. The digging clothes were never washed and were just worn until they almost fell apart.

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    Mines and Equipment

    by Basaic Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Pit Mine
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    Since mining was the whole reason for Castle Dome to exist. The museum has a nice collection of mining equipment. Photo 1 is a 16 foot deep silver and galena pit mine. Photos 2 and 3 show ore cars and tracks. Photo 4 and 5 are of various other mining equipment.

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    Castle Dome Mine Museum

    by Basaic Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Castle Dome and Castle Dome Mountain
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    The town of Castle Dome was established in 1864 after the discovery of silver ore. The town drew its name from the prominent rock formation of a mountain nearby. The town flourished breifly and opened a post office in 1875 which then closed in 1876. The town briefly came alive again in the early 1900s when mining companies found lead in the area. Many years later a man named Allen Armstrong purchased the land and converted one of the mines into a museum. He also rebuilt many buildings using old photographs as guides and recreated the town. Admission is $2. Castle Dome Mine Museum is open Sunday through Thursday from 9 AM to 5 PM. The Castle Dome Mine Museum is located 10 miles east of US Highway 95 from mile marker 55. It is between the towns of Yuma and Quartzsite. The rock formation in the middle of the main picture is Castle Dome Mountain.

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    Ghost Towns, Mines, and Cemetaries

    by malecon Written Nov 1, 2008
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    Within twenty square miles of Yuma are a number of historical sites. Some have absolutely no visible remains but their past existence is marked by a plaque. One such is the Mission San Pedro y San Pablo de Bicuñer. Not even the foundation is left of this Spanish mission.

    Across the state line and twenty miles beyond is the ghost town site of Tumco. Take the Ogilby exit and head east. For a quick side trip, turn left onto the dirt road before the railroad tracks. Here is the cemetary of Ogilby, a simple defunct railroad depot.

    Get back on the road for another three miles to a large sign for the Gold Rock trailer park it's to the left about four miles distant. The Gold Rock store is filled with rustic antiques and odds & ends. The yard has old mining equipment no doubt from the many local gold mines.

    Tumco was the most prominent though there are scant remains except for three large cyanide vats. It's all worth checking out if you have the time.

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    Reach both sides of Colorado

    by gubbi1 Updated Sep 8, 2008

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    Yuma, AZ, US

    To visit the Fort Yuma and the sites on the other side of the Colorado, I recommed to park at the side of Fort Yuma. If you ask how to get to the other site, you might get the same answer, that there is no direct way to walk, but I found one. So after visiting the Fort, you should go over the parking towards the graveyard. Turn left and go down to the river. Now you need to go underneeth the bridge. You will get on the other side of the railway bridge, same side as the prison. Now go left again to get up to the street. I don't know exactly how it looks like now, as they were making the area nice with grass and new paths. But as soon as you get up to the street you can now cross the Colorado over the street bridge and reach the church. Just remember how you got here, you will need to go back the same way.

    The picture should give you a rough idea of the directions. The red line connects the prison with the church, the blue line leads further to Fort Yuma.

    EDIT: See here about the construction of the Yuma Riverfront

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    Ocean to Ocean Bridge

    by Erika74 Written Feb 5, 2008
    The Venue
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    Gateway Park is one of the newest park in town. It is located right under the Ocean to Ocean Bridge. This bridge reopened within the past decade. Currently it is a one lane bridge that connects Old Town Yuma and the Quechan hill. Just norhtwest on that road you end up at the Paradise Casino. CHA CHING!!!!!
    The Bridge lights up at Night and you can read it from afar "Ocean to Ocean Bridge".

    The park was the recent venue for my husbands Surprise Party. The Colorado River flows through here- it provides a beach area.
    The park actually forms part of the Heritage Area for Yuma, Arizona. It is considered to be part of the West Wetlands; an equistrian trail goes through here as well.

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    Palms in a Canyon

    by Erika74 Written Jul 11, 2005

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    Palm Trees in the Desert

    Palm Canyon is off of hiway 95 north of Yuma about 25 miles before Quartzite, AZ.
    A short hike up the mountain, and you will see this spectacular view of some palm trees in the canyon. You can hike right into the canyon.

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