Bentonville Things to Do

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    by missspock709
  • BAttel layout on the ground
    BAttel layout on the ground
    by BruceDunning
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    Entrance facade.
    by razorbacker

Most Recent Things to Do in Bentonville

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    Oasis of Art.

    by razorbacker Written May 5, 2012

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    Crystal Bridges is an outstanding "Museum of American Art," a delight of unexpected artistic treasures contained in a museum whose design is a remarkable work of art in itself. A number of sculptures by various artists also grace the surrounding grounds. Crystal Bridges was founded in 2005 by Wal-Mart heiress Alice Walton. There is no admission charge. The museum is closed Tuesdays. Hours are: M, Th, Sat, Sun 1100-1800; W & F 1100-2100.

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  • The Museum of Native American History

    by missspock709 Written Mar 12, 2012

    The Museum of Native American History has one of the finest and most comprehensive collections of American Indian artifacts I have ever seen. They have ancient artifacts, pottery, arrowheads; and historic artifacts, clothing, headdresses, weapons, photographs, and much more. It is family friendly and handicap accessible. Not too many locals seem to know about this place and we need to get the word out!

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    Wal Mart History Center

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Located right in the middle of the town of Bentonville, it was a 5 and 10 (dime) store of 4,000 Square feet. Now it is the center showing how the Walton's, yes besides Sam there was James as brother that promulgated the stores to such magnitude it is beyond belief. This is now the US heritage to our society-buying and on the cheap. The museum started in 1977, but got a kick start of growth in 1984. There is a lot of memorabilia of the Walton's and the employees and the growth that can take a couple of hours to view. Sam died in 1992 and brother James in 1994. The family was rooted in this town, so that is why it started here. Now sales are $350 billion + and they have 1.2 million employees worldwide, and account for 15% of US retail sales. Some stats-huh? It is big

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    Bella Vista

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    This area in the far NW corner of Arkansas, and close to Missouri border has been a mecca for retired people for over 40 years. It has continued to grow and is huge in size. There is a total of 16,000 acres, much of which is still timber land. The Linebarger brothers started Bella Vista Resort in 1930's. In 1963, Cooper Communities, a large developer became promoting the area to retire and they still own much of the property. There are 8 lakes, 7 golf courses, 14 tennis courts, and many trails. Lot sales have been going on since 1930's when 700 were sold. Today there are nearly 20,000 people living in the community, even though that may decline with aged.
    We did not stop for a visit, but Micky-companion-and I have been here before, and relatives even owned some lots in the past, now sold with little profit. It has been going since early 1960's, and a lot of people bought lots to speculate back then. Now they are being developed with homes.

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    Native American Indian Clothing Museum

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Wow. By far this is one of the more detailed displays of Indian artifacts I have seen in my life, and most likely in the US. The theme is to take you from the BC times when Indians migrated to the North American continent and settled throughout. It is estimated there may have been as many as 30 million Indians at one time. A number of Indian collectors donated their items to the museum, and they are all very wonderful and unique.Thousands of arrowheads and tools, but also clothing, and displays of everyday life going through the various periods of evolution of the Indians. The clothes, and living necessities are very good displays. The leather calendar is unique and actual from early 1800's' uses pictures of annual events rather than alphabet, which they did not have.
    Donation is appreciated, and there is no charge-but pay them for the work put in to maintain and preserve. Hours are 9-5 Mon-Sat.

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    War Eagle MIll

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Plaque on the mill info
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    The mill was first built in 1832 by Mr. Blackburn, and with six children owned for 80 year in the generations. The mill burned in 1838, rebuilt and burned in 1848, and then during the Civil War and again 1873. Must have been a match happy crowd. They sold in 1920 to a hotel operator who had to close in 1924. It stayed closed until 1973 when Caywells family rebuilt the structure and owned for 30 years. They sold to Roenigcs of Eureka Springs in 2004. A flood March 2008 brought 4 feet of water to cover the first floor, but 2nd and 3rd were okay. Yes, it got reworked again.

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    Peel Mansion

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    View of the mansion from the front
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    It is crowded and right in the middle of a busy area, and next to -guess what - a Walmart store and across the street form the headquarters. It was preserved due to locals putting up $1 million in order for Sam Walton not to tear it down. He relented and built a store in the rear area.
    Colonel Peel came here in 1875 after the South lost the war. He raised 9 children and the farm of 180 acres was growing apples. Peel became a Congressman and was always proud to entertain people in his mansion. It was splendor in its day, and none matched the Italianate detail. Furnishings were donated for the period era mostly by family members. In renovation in 1994, they had to stucco over the old brick because it was eroding. The adjacent cabin of Andy Lynch is from 1861, and it a very pristine condition, like 100+ years had not effected the structure. It is the gift shop now and office to get a ticket. The gardens is a replica of what it did look like in the old days, and very colorful.
    Cost is $3, and they are open 10-4 on Tues-Sat. Well worth a visit

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    Rogers-Next Door

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Solid built in its time
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    This town merges with Bentonville and they both are literally on top of each other. Rogers originally had more territory, but Bentonville ended up with the old square and west area. With the surge of Walmart and its headquarters, Bentonville became bigger than Rogers, but they both have many fast food places and retail strips and traffic. The old town started in 1888, but most is gone now. What is now old is from the 1920-50's in the old town square. It still is nice to view the old time architecture. The fame was from the Frisco railroad coming through the town with track in 1881. They still have Frisco Park and the pavilion is a hang out for activity and young crowd to get to know each other

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    Town Square Old Structures

    by BruceDunning Updated May 1, 2009

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    History of the town
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    The town has a fair number of old buildings, mostly in the town square. It also has a lot of red limestone homes that were built with flat thin stones. They are of an era in 1940-60's. The square was relocated to here in early 1900's so it could hold more events. Besides Walton Visitor Center as an anchor of the square, there is also the Courthouse. It was designed by A.O. Clark, a reknowned local architect who did a lot of work also in Fayetteville. Cost to build was $200,000 in and was constructed in 1928. There is also a couple of restaurants and some shops to buy things.

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    Prairie Grove Battefield

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 30, 2009

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    Sign to the area off the highway
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    This site is of a battle for the frontier and which State would be North or South. It took place December 1862 over 400 acres of ground. There were 2700 casualties and the South ended up drawing away from the fight. Gen Heron and the North had been pursuing South armies and Gen Hindman around the NW territory and this fight set the Confederates back. They have about 10 buildings preserved, or replicated, and the field of battle can be driven through-about 1+ miles.

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    Native American-Indian Museum

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 30, 2009

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    Tent in the front to note
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    Wow. By far one of the more detailed displays of Indian artifacts I have seen in my life. They theme is to take you from the BC times when Indians migrated to the North American continent and settled throughout. It is estimated there may have been as many as 30 million Indians at one time. A number of Indian collectors donated their items to the museum, and they are very wonderful. Thousands of arrowheads and tools, but also clothing, and displays of everyday life going through the various periods of evolution of the Indians.
    Donation is appreciated, and there is no charge-but pay them for the work put in to maintain and preserve. Hours are 9-5 Mon-Sat.

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    Compton Gardens

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 30, 2009

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    Carved stone monument in entry
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    This was the home of Neil Compton, a physician as a career. He also was an avid crusader to preserve nature. His big project was to get people interested in preserving the Buffalo River, and today it stands as a show piece of what preserved nature can be like. The home and 6.5 acres was donated by Compton estate in 2002, after he died in 1990's. It is a mostly wooded area, that has some trails going about 1/2 mile, or so. It is okay to view, but somewhat small and not colorful. It is the woods in the center of town is the purpose.

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    Pea Ridge BAttefiled

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 29, 2009

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    Brochure of the battle
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    This 4,300 acre site commemorates a battle lasting March 7 & 8, 1862. Confederates had the edge and the purpose was to have Missouri be a South state. Gen VAn Dorn left the backup ammo too far away for a pitched battle to repel a Northern rout around the back side of the lines. That forced the South to retreat from the field. The park is open daily 8-5 except holidays. Cost is $4 and the drive of about 2 miles takes you to 10 points of battle confrontations on the ground. The visitor center has a 15 minute movie of the events.

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    Beaver DAm

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 29, 2009

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    Vie of dam and spill way
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    This dam was built in 1966 for $46 million. The dam itself is 2575 feet long and the depth at the base is 1142 feet. White River is the flow to create the dam, and this river goes 689 miles from south Arkansas going north to Missouri and back to the south. There was 780,000 pounds of concrete poured. SAhore line in 489 miles around. The dam is a backup for hydro electricity when needed, supporting about 20-30 % power in peak times.

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    Hobbs State Park-Beaver Lake

    by BruceDunning Updated Apr 29, 2009

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    Purchased in 1979, the State got 11,644 acres of land, and a lake to boot. There is fishing, boating, camping, trail walks, and other recreation here. The lake is fed by the White River running through it, and is 1182 feet at deepest point. It is 28,370 acres

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    • National/State Park

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Comments (1)

  • Jul 15, 2014 at 5:25 PM

    Have an idea where and how much

    • goodfish's Profile Photo
      Jul 15, 2014 at 6:08 PM

      Hi. You need to post more information for people to help you, please. Where and how much for what? Your question is also better asked in the Bentonville travel forum where people who know this locations will see it:

      Bentonville Travel Forum



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