Fayetteville Things to Do

  • Ozark Lanes
    Ozark Lanes
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Most Recent Things to Do in Fayetteville

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    Dickson Street ramble

    by razorbacker Updated Apr 26, 2012
    Old Post Office (I used to work there.)
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    Dickson was always the funky wayfare for the U of A. Generally plenty of nightlife and eclectic pursuits along here. Book stores, art galleries, sundries shops. Also site of the Walton Center for the Arts now.

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    Ozark Lanes and Coffee Shop

    by razorbacker Written Apr 26, 2012
    Ozark Lanes
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    The bowling is fun here, but this place means a lot more to me! I was a cook in the restaurant. That's where I met my beautiful first wife, Darla Krug. She was a waitress there. Boy, did I love that girl! We eloped to Jay, Oklahoma. We had two little girls LaShonda Faye and Anna Marie who were just wonderful rays of sunshine and meant everything to me. I loved our little family. We had many happy days while it lasted. - I used to make some killer steaks, omelets, and biscuits and gravy. Bet it still tastes great!

    Bowling Alley hours: M-Th 1000-2300. Fri-Sat 1000-0100. Sun 1200-2200.

    Cafe opens M-F 0600. Sat & Sun 0700.

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    Old Main, or University Hall

    by mrclay2000 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Old Main, U of Arkansas campus

    The University of Arkansas campus at Fayetteville is a collegiate sprawl through dozens of acres in the center of town. Its premier building and its oldest was constructed in 1875 as University Hall. Since that time affectionately referred to as "Old Main" and the first Arkansas structure to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places (several reside on campus), Old Main is emphatically the quintessence of American college architecture.

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    Town Streets and architecture

    by BruceDunning Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    View of the town from Univ of Arkansas campus
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    The old part of town is nice to drive through and note the old homes, and historic downtown. However, there is not a lot of reason to spend a day there. The town square is mostly offices and the Courthouse. Surrounding streets are merely older homes of not real ornate style. I can picture Bill and HIllary strolling along the streets hand in hand, as if they were in love. Read up of the motivation, and find that they got a marriage of convenience, and even back then Bill was not faithful. Hard to believe, HUH? Ha ha

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    Dickson Street-EAt and Drink

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Main strip toward campus
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    This is where college meets the locals. There are about 6+ eating places on the strip of 4-5 blocks and liquor, and bars. It looks like it could hop at night if you are up to it. The stores are all in older buildings that look like from 1950-70's strata.

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    Homes of Old Past

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Walker-Stone house
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    There are two homes that supposedly are able to be viewed. WE were not able to do so because they were closed and may be except for the summer months. One is an now an office while the other the information is lacking. They both are on Center Street, just two blocks west of the square. The Walker -Stone house is originally from 1840, but shelled in Civil War. Afterword Mr Stone occupied and improved in late 1800's. The Ridge house has tours and the home is from 1836, the oldest home in the city. Located 230 W. Central, it now has clapboard covering the original log siding that is still in place. Sarah Ridge, a widow of husband and Cherokee leader who was murdered by other Cherokee's for what he had done wrong to them, bought the house. The funeral home was called Rieff House and it is from 1857

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    University Campus

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Old Stone structure to meditate
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    It takes up a good 20+ city blocks and the walk is tedious if you traverse it all. They have 130 buildings and 345 acres to walk. Campus has close to 20,000 students, and been in existence since 1872 for classes. Some of the original structures still stand and are of limestone since it was prevalent for the area materials to build with. Layout of the campus is a rolling rid, but the middle is a walk uphill to be at the top and middle section. It is a rather quiet setting, though and the grounds are nice.

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    Prairie Grove Battefield

    by BruceDunning Written Apr 30, 2009

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    View of some homes in the woods
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    This site is of a battle for the frontier and which State would be North or South. It took place December 1862 over 400 acres of ground. There were 2700 casualties and the South ended up drawing away from the fight. Gen Heron and the North had been pursuing South armies and Gen Hindman around the NW territory and this fight set the Confederates back. They have about 10 buildings preserved, or replicated, and the field of battle can be driven through-about 1+ miles. Fee is $4 and they have a movie of 15 minutes and some displays in the visitor center, besides being able to tour some of the homes on the drive/walk by of the trail.

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  • Clinton House Museum

    by bnstarr84 Written Jul 24, 2007

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    The Clinton House Museum is the first home of Bill and Hillary Clinton and served as the wedding chapel of Bill and Hillary's wedding on October 11, 1975. Visitors can browse through photographs, historical documents and videos, and learn about a part of the Clintons' life that many have never discovered.

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    Walton's Five and Dime

    by icsgirl28 Written Jul 16, 2006

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    This little shop was Sam Walton's original store. It's located in Rogers Arkansas. I recommend visiting this town in general. It's very reminiscent of small town America as it used to be. It's a beautiful place.

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    Devil's Den State Park

    by MainstreetAmerican Written Jan 5, 2005

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    About 25 miles to the south is Devil's Den State Park. Admission to the park is free and there are many hiking trails that range from easy to moderately difficult (for those from the lowlands). If you are not an avid hiker I would recommend the Devil's Den trail. This trail is very easy and short (about 2 miles long) and you can see some very beautiful Ozark scenery including a couple different caves. There is also some good camping in the area. It is some of the best and most accessible nature in the NW part of the "Natural State". I highly recommend a visit to Devil's Den.

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    Chemicals, Anyone?

    by mrclay2000 Written Oct 4, 2003

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    Chemistry Building, University of Arkansas

    Though the modern campus has a number of architecturally progressive buildings, the Chemistry Building (begun in the 1920s) makes the National Register of Historic Places for its classical architecture. Today's campus has a second chemistry building, both overlooking a series of paved walkways on which the names of all graduates are annually carved.

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    Theater, Anyone?

    by mrclay2000 Written Oct 4, 2003

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    Chi Omega Greek Theater

    The University of Arkansas campus has a handful of structural gems that grace the National Register of Historic Places. Among these is the Chi Omega Greek Theater, built in the 1930s as a gift to the university from the international sorority. Today the beautiful amphitheater hosts plays and rallies, but on off-days the students use its tranquil solitude to study or picnic.

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    Fayetteville National Cemetery

    by mrclay2000 Written Oct 4, 2003

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    Fayetteville National Cemetery headstones

    Unlike the Confederate Cemetery nearby, the Fayetteville National Cemetery is open to the public. The grounds are quite tiny for a federal cemetery, no larger than the Confederate burial ground, but its plots readily resemble the endless rows of headstones at Arlington. Like the older Confederate Cemetery the federal cemetery is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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    Confederate Cemetery

    by mrclay2000 Updated Oct 4, 2003

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    monument, Confederate Cemetery

    Even though Arkansas seceded from the Union, she sent soldiers to fight for both the Confederate and the Federal armies. Mothers and daughters and sisters buried rebel fathers and brothers in the Old Fayetteville Confederate Cemetery, though the departed had been interred here from the 1850s. Access to the graves is forbidden except to family members, but its small confines are easy to review from the perimeter. The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Fayetteville Things to Do

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