Fayetteville Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Fayetteville

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    Main Street, Fayetteville

    by mrclay2000 Updated Jul 26, 2003

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    historic Center Street

    Looking directly from the steps of the old courthouse is a remnant of Fayetteville's historic Main Street. Similar in style to "main street" districts throughout the Midwest, the facades along Center Street do not present their original dates or much of their original purposes. This detail, along with the congestion of parked vehicles along every curb, somewhat marrs the view and obscures the notion that county activity once centered in this "special" enclave.

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    Old County Business

    by mrclay2000 Updated Jul 26, 2003

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    old courthouse, Washington County

    Built in 1904 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Washington County's original Courthouse stands prominently in Victorian (if not Romanesque) style at the corner of Center and College Avenues. The huge church-like steeple still tells the time, while the ambitious and ornate front facade still face one of the better preserved remnants of Fayetteville's "Main Street" sections. A new courthouse of plain red brick was built to continue the county business only a few blocks farther up College Street.

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    Headquarters House

    by mrclay2000 Written Jul 26, 2003

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    Headquarters House, main entrance

    Not far from the courthouses is the so-called Headquarters House, built by Jonas Tebbetts in the late 1850s. Used by the Federal forces during the battle of Fayetteville (1863), portions of the house still bare scars from musketry and cannon fire. Though not much to smile at from the outside, the gardens are fine and the interior well-preserved. Headquarters House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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    Historical Districts II

    by mrclay2000 Updated Jul 26, 2003

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    shades of Victorian on Washington Street

    Homes in many historical districts seem to repeat the same basic styles ad infinitum. A certain kind of Victorian architecture seems prominent, especially on Washington Street between Lafayette and Dickson, though several other styles are represented.

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    Old County Lockdown

    by mrclay2000 Written Jul 26, 2003

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    old Washington County jail

    Near the original courthouse stands the original Washington County jail, a simple structure in the same style as the courthouse though less ornate. The turrets and simple stonework make the structure look more like a museum piece, but perhaps this is a result of the historical preservationists in Fayetteville. Serving as the official county lockdown until 1972, the building now ironically houses a law firm.

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    Historical Districts I

    by mrclay2000 Updated Jul 26, 2003

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    Washington-Willow Historic Districts

    On Washington Street near Fayetteville's genealogical library stands the Washington-Willow Historical District. Homes in this area are especially attractive from their varied architecture and some from their antebellum design. Like many old neighborhoods, the sidewalks teem with towering maples, which are fitting accessories to these old fine homes.

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    Homes of Old Past

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Walker-Stone house
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    There are two homes that supposedly are able to be viewed. WE were not able to do so because they were closed and may be except for the summer months. One is an now an office while the other the information is lacking. They both are on Center Street, just two blocks west of the square. The Walker -Stone house is originally from 1840, but shelled in Civil War. Afterword Mr Stone occupied and improved in late 1800's. The Ridge house has tours and the home is from 1836, the oldest home in the city. Located 230 W. Central, it now has clapboard covering the original log siding that is still in place. Sarah Ridge, a widow of husband and Cherokee leader who was murdered by other Cherokee's for what he had done wrong to them, bought the house. The funeral home was called Rieff House and it is from 1857

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    Fayetteville National Cemetery

    by mrclay2000 Written Oct 4, 2003

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    Fayetteville National Cemetery headstones

    Unlike the Confederate Cemetery nearby, the Fayetteville National Cemetery is open to the public. The grounds are quite tiny for a federal cemetery, no larger than the Confederate burial ground, but its plots readily resemble the endless rows of headstones at Arlington. Like the older Confederate Cemetery the federal cemetery is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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    Headquarters Household

    by mrclay2000 Written Jul 26, 2003

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    Headquarters House, interior

    Today, the Headquarters House offers a variety of books featuring local Arkansas history and information on local and county matters, both present and historical. Visitors are asked to sign the guestbook, and the tour of the remainder of the house is self-guided. In case you happen to miss the wounds to the home from the Civil War, the attendants will be happy to point them out. Admission is nominal, and photography is encouraged.

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    Fayetteville on Parade

    by mrclay2000 Updated Jul 26, 2003

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    Washington Country history

    A mural with 44 representations of historical events and personages in Fayetteville's history stands somewhat inconspicuously across from the town's mail library near the Washington-Willow Historic Districts. Truth be told, most of Arkansas' illustrious past is unknown to most Arkansans, which roughly speaks true for any other state. The mural overlooks the library parking lot, and the library itself contains a rich genealogical collection.

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    Historical Districts III

    by mrclay2000 Written Jul 26, 2003

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    pillars of colonialism

    Perhaps better associated with some of the antebellum mansions of Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, the American Colonial style is not far from the Washington-Willow Historic District, though much less numerous than the Victorian and other styles.

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    Bank of Fayetteville Building

    by mrclay2000 Written Oct 4, 2003

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    Bank of Fayetteville

    Given the predominance of Victorian architecture through the Midwest before the dawn of the 20th century, it is no surprise to see the same styles in early businesses in Fayetteville. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the former Bank of Fayetteville still graces the original town square and to this day remains a part of the banking community. The bartizan type turret stands guard over a corner of Center Street and presently guards the front entrance.

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    Confederate Cemetery

    by mrclay2000 Updated Oct 4, 2003

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    monument, Confederate Cemetery

    Even though Arkansas seceded from the Union, she sent soldiers to fight for both the Confederate and the Federal armies. Mothers and daughters and sisters buried rebel fathers and brothers in the Old Fayetteville Confederate Cemetery, though the departed had been interred here from the 1850s. Access to the graves is forbidden except to family members, but its small confines are easy to review from the perimeter. The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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    University Campus

    by BruceDunning Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Old Stone structure to meditate
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    It takes up a good 20+ city blocks and the walk is tedious if you traverse it all. They have 130 buildings and 345 acres to walk. Campus has close to 20,000 students, and been in existence since 1872 for classes. Some of the original structures still stand and are of limestone since it was prevalent for the area materials to build with. Layout of the campus is a rolling rid, but the middle is a walk uphill to be at the top and middle section. It is a rather quiet setting, though and the grounds are nice.

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    Prairie Grove Battefield

    by BruceDunning Written Apr 30, 2009

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    View of some homes in the woods
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    This site is of a battle for the frontier and which State would be North or South. It took place December 1862 over 400 acres of ground. There were 2700 casualties and the South ended up drawing away from the fight. Gen Heron and the North had been pursuing South armies and Gen Hindman around the NW territory and this fight set the Confederates back. They have about 10 buildings preserved, or replicated, and the field of battle can be driven through-about 1+ miles. Fee is $4 and they have a movie of 15 minutes and some displays in the visitor center, besides being able to tour some of the homes on the drive/walk by of the trail.

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Fayetteville Things to Do

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