Harrison Travel Guide

  • Courthouse square
    Courthouse square
    by Toughluck
  • Restaurants
    by Toughluck
  • downtown
    downtown
    by Toughluck

Harrison Things to Do

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    by Toughluck Written Dec 18, 2008

    You'll still see it on the maps. You'll think it's a small town, when it was originally an amusement park based on Li'l Abner (the newspaper comic strip). It's been closed for years. The park sits along Arkansas & below it's junction with Arkansas 206. The old town looks like it could have been a fun place. I guess there is not enough traffic to keep it viable.

    There is a pull off on the west side of the road, just south of the park, where you'll have a nice view of a waterfall (which seems to be at the south side of the old amusement area. There is also a monument to the group of Pioneers who left these mountains for California and were killed at the Mountain Meadow Massacre in southern Utah.

    Waterfall along Arkansas 7 Historic Marker on Arkansas 7
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  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Dec 13, 2006

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    On the north side of the Harrison town square is this monument to you young men from Boone County who fought and died, defending their homeland from northern aggressors during the War Between the States.

    The inscription on the monument speaks not only for the fallen heroes of the Lost Cause, but also of a lost noble mindset and eloquence which is seldom seen or heard in today's world:
    .
    .

    THIS MONUMENT PERPETUATES THE MEMORY
    OF THOSE TRUE TO THE INSTINCTS OF THEIR BIRTH
    FAITHFUL TO THE TEACHINGS OF THEIR FATHERS
    CONSTANT IN THEIR LOVE FOR THE STATE
    DIED IN THE PERFORMANCE OF THEIR DUTY
    WHO HAVE GLORIFIED A FALLEN CAUSE
    BY THE SIMPLE MANHOOD OF THEIR LIVES
    THE PATIENT ENDURANCE OF SUFFERING
    AND THE HEROISM OF DEATH
    AND WHO IN THE DARK HOURS OF IMPRISONMENT
    IN THE HOPELESSNESS OF THE HOSPITAL
    IN THE SHORT SHARP AGONY OF THE FIELD
    FOUND SUPPORT AND CONSOLATION IN THE BELIEF
    THAT AT HOME THEY WOULD NOT BE FORGOTTEN
    LET THE STANGER WHO MAY IN FUTURE TIMES
    READ THIS INSCRIPTION
    RECOGNIZE THAT THESE WERE MEN
    WHOM POWER COULD NOT CORRUPT
    WHOM DEATH COULD NOT TERRIFY
    WHOM DEFEAT COULD NOT DISHONOR
    AND LET THEIR VIRTUES PLEAD FOR JUST JUDGMENT
    OF THE CASE IN WHICH THEY PERISHED
    LET THE ARKANSAWYER OF ANOTHER GENERATION
    REMEMBER THAT THE STATE TAUGHT THEM
    HOW TO LIVE AND HOW TO DIE
    AND THAT FROM THEIR BROKEN FORTUNES
    SHE HAS PRESENTED FOR THEIR CHILDREN
    THE PRICELESS TREASURE OF THEIR MEMORIES
    TEACHING ALL WHO MAY CLAIM THE SAME BIRTHRIGHT
    THAT TRUTH, COURAGE AND PATRIOTISM ENDURE FOREVER

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  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Dec 13, 2006

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    On the town square in front of the Boone County Courthouse stands this silent witness to the 140 men, women and children from the Harrison area who were victims of the Mountain Meadows Massacre, one of the most horrific atrocities in American history.

    The massacred were emigrants on their way to California who departed from Caravan Spring, about 4 miles south of Harrison, Arkansas, around May 1, 1857. They traveled by wagon train and camped at Mountain Meadows, in Utah, in the late summer. There they were attacked by Indians who were directed by Mormon settlers.

    The pioneers fought and fended off the Indians for several days until both their supply of ammunition and their bodies were exhausted. Then they were approached by a band of Mormons under a banner of truce. The emigrants dropped their rifles and cheered when they saw that it was white men who were approaching.

    Then the Mormon outlaws turned on them and brutally murdered 120 men, women and older children. 17 small children were later found in Mormon homes, rescued by the United States Army.

    John D. Lee, a Mormon Bishop who confessed guilt, was tried, convicted and executed for his complicity in the crime in 1877.

    Beneath the inscription on the monument is this quote from the Bible: "Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord."

    Mountain Meadows Massacre Monument Closeup: Front of Mounment Closeup: Rear of Monument Rear View: Mountain Meadows Massacre Monument
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Harrison Hotels

See all 8 Hotels in Harrison
  • Hampton Inn Harrison

    121 HIGHWAY 43 EAST HARRISON, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Solo

  • Comfort Inn Harrison

    1210 US 62/65 North, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Families

  • Holiday Inn Express Harrison

    117 Highway 43 East, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Solo

  • Super 8 Harrison

    1330 US Highway 62/65 North, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

    Satisfaction: Poor

    Good for: Families

  • Family Budget Inn

    401 S Main St, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

    Satisfaction: Poor

    Good for: Couples

  • Days Inn Harrison

    1425 Highway 62-65 North, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

    Satisfaction: Poor

    Good for: Business

  • Queen Anne House

    610 West Central Avenue, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Families

  • 1929 Hotel Seville

    302 North Main Street, Harrison, Arkansas, 72601, United States

Harrison Restaurants

  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    by Toughluck Updated Dec 18, 2008

    Bright and friendly staff. We learned all about the history of the house and what they were doing to restore it. The spring floods had affect the building and we were able to learn about what they had to do to save the place. We were met by the owner (a young couple) and because it was early everyone talked with us freely.

    Favorite Dish: from local dishes to old stand-bys. We had the bar-ba-que. It was great, although it's not one of their specialties, just the special of the day.

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Harrison Nightlife

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Dec 13, 2006

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    The Lyric Theater sits directly across from the Boone County Courthouse on the Harrison town square, and is in the town's National Historic District. It is owned and operated by the Ozark Arts Council which presents theatrical productions, concerts and fine arts programs.

    The theater puts on an average of about 30 productions per year. Click the web link below for upcoming events.

    Lyric Theater, Harrison, Arkansas
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Harrison Favorites

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Dec 13, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Probably the first inhabitants of what is today Boone County were the "Bluff Dwellers", who lived in caves in the bluffs along the rivers. Later the Osage Indians, a branch of the Sioux, was the main tribe in the Ozarks and one of their larger villages is thought to have been to the east of the present site of Harrison. Other tribes familiar with the area include the Shawnee, Quapaw, and Caddo Indians.

    The Cherokee arrived around 1816, but had conflicts with the Osage, which erupted into a full scale Indian war in the Ozark Mountains. By the 1830's both tribes were removed to Oklahoma by the expanding empire of the United States.

    Some historians think that the Spanish explorer Hernando Desoto spent time in the area. Others feel that it is more likely that the first white men here were French hunters or trappers who followed the course of the White River.

    Arkansas became United States territory with the Louisiana Purchase from France in 1803. In 1836 Arkansas was admitted to the Union as the 25th state.

    Boone County was not formed until after the American Civil War, on April 9, 1869, from the eastern portion of Carroll County. It became the 62nd county in the state of Arkansas. Residents originally named their county Boon, because they believed it would be a "boon" to all who settled there. The final e was added later.

    Boone County, Arkansas

    Boone County Courthouse Square, Harrison, Arkansas
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  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Dec 13, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Just one block east of the Harrison town square is a large curved retainer wall along Rush Street. I enjoyed seeing the beautiful murals (pictured) that are painted on the wall, depicting scenes of historic Harrison and environs.

    www.HarrisonArkansas.org

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  • Harrison Hotels

    8 Hotels in Harrison

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