Pine Bluff Travel Guide

  • Horizon Hotel
    Horizon Hotel
    by Basaic
  • Horizon Hotel
    Horizon Hotel
    by Basaic
  • Arkansas River - frm the rt, canal is out the lt
    Arkansas River - frm the rt, canal is...
    by Toughluck

Pine Bluff Things to Do

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    by Toughluck Written Dec 12, 2007

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    Arkansas Post was the 1st State Capitol. As the earliest settlement in the state, it became the 1st capitol. The grounds are still preserved and foundation ruins are visible. The town's streets still exist with a light grass covering.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    by Toughluck Updated Dec 12, 2007

    Located in Post Bend, the site of Fort Hindman is under water. Or more appropriately, it's been eroded by the changing river and then flooded behind the Noterebe Bend Dam. (See my General Tip on the Arkansas Waterway)

    Fort Hindman at Arkansas Post sat on a bluff that was nearly 25’ high overlooking the Arkansas River. It faced up the Post Bend Bayou, back the way you come into the park. This is because the river's bends twisted so that in the 1860's the river flowed around the park and out the Post Bend. Today, it flows out past the point to the south and the bend is a backwater.

    Post Bend (looking downriver in 1860)
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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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  • by ElAbuelo Written Jul 9, 2005

    Pine Bluff's population has declined from 70,000 when it was a bustling city in a very large cotton, soybean and rice producing area. There are large cotton gins there, a federal compress where cotton fibers are compressed into 500 lb. bales, a plant that extracts oil from cottonseed and soybeans for margarine and cooking oils, two paper mills, a government facility on over 2,000 acres, a grain storage and shipping facility, and a large railroad yard. Now the population is 55,000, and the city looks like a ghost town. For me it is terrible because we once lived in Pine Bluff in the Dollarway area. Crime has risen to chronic proportions, and once beautiful neighborhoods are now run down. And to top it off, in a town that once had an abundance of good places to eat, now you need to drive 35+ miles to Little Rock to get a decent meal. I have always loved "mom and pop" diners, cafes, and restaurants, but even these let me down when I was working in Pine Bluff from December, 2004 to May, 2005. So save your money if you are visiting Pine Bluff on business or pleasure; drive to Little Rock to dine!!!!!!!!!

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Fishing
    • Sailing and Boating

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Pine Bluff Local Customs

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    by Toughluck Written Dec 12, 2007

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    After the visitor center closes, the fishermen and women begin to show up. The park is open and offers some easy access to the bayou's.

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    • Fishing

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Pine Bluff Warnings and Dangers

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    by Toughluck Written Apr 6, 2007

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    This is Poison Ivy and Poison Sumac country. Be on the alert for the three leaf plant. It can be a vine, a low shrub or a sprout of just 3 leaves. The oil causes a rash and an iche. Scratching only serves to spread it further. If you get it between your fingers, just the normal movement of the fingers spreads it further along the skin between the fingers.

    Once it's on your hands, it tends to move to any place you touch. Especially into your eyes. If the plant is being burned, the oils move with the smoke and can be inhaled (yes, there have been cases of poison ivy in the lungs). If the smoke makes contact with your eyes, it gets there. Stay out of smoke, unless you know what's being burned.

    Courtesy of the National Park Service

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Pine Bluff Off The Beaten Path

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    by Toughluck Updated Feb 1, 2007

    In 1686, Henri de Tonti established a trading post known as "Poste de Arkansea" at the Quapaw village of Osotouy. It was the first semi-permanent French settlement in the lower Mississippi River Valley. The establishment of the Post was the first step in a long struggle between France, Spain, and England over the interior of the North American continent.

    See the Visitor Center for an overview of what's in the park. Mostly, it's the kind of place to come and walk, read, and enjoy the out-doors. The evening hours find fishermen and their families arriving. If you're interested in the park, take a walk through the old capital grounds (mowed and open under the trees) to the point. At the point, you'll gaze across the Arkansas River, which literally is running the opposite direction from how the channel was in the 1860's. It is somewhere out in the water that the first townsite exists. Well, it doesn't really exist, as the lands around here have been moved and rearranged numerous times by the river.

    Along the entrance road is the Civil War (Fort Hindman) pull off. The Fort, which once guarded the Arkansas River approach, stood on the banks of the River when it was built. Trenches ran across the peninsula of land formed by a bend in the River. The Union Army approached from the east (left) up the river and than marched overland to face the fort. Today, the fort is gone and Post Bayou covers the place where it once stood. Remants of the trenches are visible through the woods behind you and can be reached by a road running along the front of the trenches.

    Post Bayou Site of Fort Hindman Site of 1st Arkansas State Capital Arkansas River Visitor Center
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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Pine Bluff Favorites

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    by Toughluck Written Dec 12, 2007

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    Favorite thing: The Arkansas River has been developed into a major waterway carrying freight and passenger traffic. River traffic can reach all the way to Catoosa, Oklahoma (northeast of Tulsa). The dam at Notrebes Bend holds back the river to increase the channel depth to 9'. A canal, bends around the point of the park and cuts across the bayous to White River. From there it flows to the Mississippi River. This leap between rivers, saves many miles of twisting waterways along the Arkansas River before it joins the Mississippi River.

    Arkansas River - frm the rt, canal is out the lt
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    • National/State Park

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