Bishop Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Things to Do in Bishop

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    The Little Kittie Inn Market

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

    The plaque reads: In August 1924 Matt Wilkenson opened the Kittie Lee Inn, which was named for his daughter. When William R. Whorff purchased it in 1925, the Kittie Lee became "the" place to stay for Hollywood's finest.

    When Bishop Airport was a training center during WWII the dining room became a barracks. In 1946 the Copper Kettle Restaurant and Charlie's Room Bar was added.

    In 1965 the inn was torn down and in 1975 the building was sold to Sam Walker who reconstructed it as Whiskey Creek Restaurant and Bar.

    Dedicated June 17, 1995
    Slim Princess Chapter No. 395, E Clampus Vitus.

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    The Slim Princess Mural

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

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    The Slim Princess “Engine 9” was built in 1909 and first saw service on the 36 inch narrow gauge rails (standard gauge is 4 feet 8 ½ inches) of the Nevada, California and Oregon Railroad. It came to the Mina Branch of the Southern Pacific in 1929 and ran from Mina to Keeler until 1938.

    In it’s early years, the Slim Princess (no one knows the origin of the name) carried passengers as well as mining and agricultural outputs. However, with the advent of highways and standard track, the decline in mining, the lines were abandoned and in 1945 the rails were taken up for the Second World War.

    In 1954 S.P. purchases a diesel engine so the remaining 3 steam engines (which could burn up to 800 gallons of oil per round trip from Laws to Keeler) were retired. No. 9 ran under her own power for the last time in 1959 and was then kept as a standby. It was seen in several movies shot in the area including John Wayne’s “The Three Godfathers”.

    The Slim Princess was donated to Inyo County and along with the depot, water tower, turntable, etc., it formed the nucleus of the Laws Museum and Historical Site. Its located 5 miles north of Bishop on Highway 6.

    Painted by by Robert Thomas, John Knowlton and Richard Perkins.

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    Celebrating the Sierra

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

    This natural history mural of ceramic tiles and mosaic contains 237 species of flora and fauna dwelling in the Eastern Sierra. Each unique tile was hand sculpted and painted by one of 216 community members in a directed collaboration. The mural is dedicated to the committed volunteers of Inyo County Search and Rescue, in appreciation for their service to the community.

    Painted by Patty Holton, Betty Cameron, Susanne Olson, Margaret Phelps, Sara Steck, Coleen Randolph, Earl Gann, Carolyn Lynch,& Carol Conner-Turner.

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    Father Crowley Mural

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

    Father John Crowley remains a legendary figure, recognized as the visionary leader who saw the potential for the region, and as a man of faith who dedicated his life to helping its inhabitants. The “Desert Padre” was born in Ireland in 1891. He is shown here with his dog “Tray” and the Model T Ford in which he traveled up to 16 hours a day along the dirt roads from Bishop to Barstow. Each year on opening day of trout season, he blessed fishing equipment. Father Crowley brought national attention to the Owens Valley with an event called “Wedding of the Waters.” At one point, Fr. Crowley actually locked chief water engineer H.C. Van Norman in a meeting room until the exasperated engineer conceded to requests to build a new dam that would restore water to the impoverished desert. Crowley Lake was named after him.

    Painted by John Knowlton, Mary Gipson-Knowlton, Kathy Sexton, Jenna Morgenstein and Pat Morgan

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    Drain Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2015

    No single event in the last 100 years has had such a dramatic and lasting effect on Bishop than the draining of Owens Valley. In providing more water for Los Angeles the result here was the loss of a vast fertile land. Here too, was a great loss of life and the loss of a great life. And here in the drying fields, a war of rights was waged whose embers still glow undoused even today. These are historical facts.
    Don't get me wrong; Bishop is an incredibl friendly town surrounded by majestic beauty. Yet the town was forever changed when the water rights changed hands.

    Exploring History through Murals is the charter of the Bishop Mural Society, and the charter of this artist to explore that history and express with fresh infusion a fabric that is this place. The tapestry of Bishop is dynamic, woven with light and dark threads. When the curtain opens in 1913, it is water that has the starring role.

    In this piece entitiled Drain, an agricultural Shangri La appears as a mural within a mural. This vision of the valley's past derives from old painting and photos, book desriptions, interviews, and visits to the less effected areas of Owens Valley. Breathing sweet orchard blossoms while gazing at the lush glory of this place 100 years ago, this depiction is not meant to portray a specific vantage point yet rather allow the viewer an ambient experience of the ecology.

    If your eyes are diverted to the drainpipe, this is by design. Like a black hole that allows no light to escape, the protruding drainpipe absorbs all color in its proximity. The odd shape surrounding the pipe is actually a preserved section of the under painting, but conceptually serves as an after image, or 'ghost blotch'. It is a stain that is createc by the absence of color information - or metaphorically, of life. Written words like 'water' and 'tree' or even 'green' are some of the sketch notes, but historically these are the line items that have virtually disappeared into the drain.

    Painted by John Pugh

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    Inyo Mono Title Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2015

    The artist of this mural, John Pugh of Los Gatos, California is universally recognized as a master of the illustionary aspect of painting, know as Trompe L'oeil (fool the eye).

    He named this mural "Young at Heart' because of its depiction of the areas early history through an actual land title that seems to have been peeled back to reveal that history through various soil strata.

    The first represents European involvement showing artifacts such as water wheel, bullets and gold veins. A second stratum depicts elements of the life of the local Pauite Indian Tribe. Further back in history is shown through fossilized remains of animals and other organisms, such as mastodon tusks and roots of the oldest living organisms, the Bristlecone Pines. At the top of the mural, Mr. Pugh shows us a very real dog that grounds the mural and provides a playful element.

    Bishop Mural Society 2002, Artist John Pugh.

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    Atlas Copco Mucker

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

    The plaque reads: This historic mining artifact is known as a track mucking machine. It dates back to the 1960s and was used by Union Carbide Corporation at the nearby Pine Creek Tungsten mine 20 miles North West of Bishop. During World War II and for some years afterward, this mine was the largest producer of Tungsten in the world.

    The machine, originally made in Sweden, ran on rail tracks was powered by pressurized air and operated by one miner. Its primary purpose was to scoop up ore and rock that had been dynamited at the heading of the tunnel, the machine would dump the loose debris into ore carts. This saved miners the backbreaking work of shoveling the excavated material into carts, which was then removed from the mine for processing or waste storage.
    Dedicated June 22, 2013
    Slim Princess Chapter 395 E Clampus Vitus.

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    The Ernest Kinney Teamster Family Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2015

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    The mural depicting 1860 timber operations by the first settlers in Owens Valley, 1905 22 animal team hauling a generator to plant tree, packing mules at Champion Spark Plug Mine. Painting by Robert Thomas, John Knowlton, Kathy Sexton and Marilyn Hayden.

    The middle Panel:
    Power Plant and teaming mainly in 1904-1905
    This mural illustrates a twenty-two-animal team (horses and mules). Eighteen in front and four pushers in the back going up and over Sand Canyon to Power Plant #3 on Bishop Creek.

    A long-line team can stretch out 140 feet or more in front of the wagon. When going up hill and the land cresting, half of the team may be out of sight with a loss of pulling power; The same losses occur on sharp curves and switchbacks.
    The four pushers in back and the two large wheelers in front of the tongue largely controlled wagon and weight until the team again lined up. Some loads to the power plant had 32 animals in front and four pushers in back with a load of 32 tons on one wagon. The pushers here were invaluable with this load in heavy sand.

    They had tendency to raise the load as they pushed and were considered worth 10 animals in the front in this situation. These long line teams were controlled by one single line (like clothesline rope) by the muleskinner riding the near wheeler (left animal on the wagon tongue) with the line going to the front leader only. This line was called the jerk line. With one steady pull, the leader turns with the pull to the left. If the line is jerked two or three times the leader turns to the right. A four-foot-long stick called a “jockey bar” is attached to the near leader’s collar and suspended hanging from a bit of the other leader which pulls the animals head to the right or to the left as the near leader turns. Only the near leader is trained to respond to the line signal. The orange generator part that they are hauling is part of power plant machinery and weighs approximately 20 tons. It is till in use today!
    Spray Kinney was driving long-line teams at the age of twelve.

    Please check with the Bishop Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau
    690 N. Main Street, Bishop , CA 93514

    When I was trying to take pictures of the mural, and since it is located on a bank, I was in the process of capturing the middle mural when a young gentleman pulled up right into the spot I need to get a good shot. Bless his heart, he wanted to move his truck, I told him no it was fine, he said if I wanted to stand on his hood to get the shot I could...RLOL! That is hometown hospitality.

    Power Plant and Teaming 1904-05 Logging Mono Mills 1850-1910 Champion Spark Plug Mine
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    Kittie Lee Inn 1924 Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2015

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    This wonderful mural is painted on the side of Whiskey Creek Restaurant, which was the original site of a popular inn that many Hollywood stars frequented. Painted by Robert Thomas, John Knowlton and Rich Perkins.

    The Kittie Lee Inn was built in 1924 and was considered to be the height of luxury. During Hollywood’s heyday of filming movies in the High Sierra, almost all of the great stars stayed here at one time or another. Will Rogers, Randolph Scott, Hop-a-long Cassidy, Cary Grant, John Wayne, Bing Crosby, Curly Fletcher and Pat O’Brien are just a few of the names found in the old guest register. Many of the executives of the U.S. Vanadium Mine, a Tungsten Mine up Pine Creek, along with Wah Chang of the Blackrock Mine were also guests here.

    The Ohio Buckeye tree you see planted in the deck of the front door of the gift shop at the Whiskey Creek Restaurant was brought here in 1924 from Ohio and still bears buckeyes every fall.

    During World War II, the Kittie Lee dining room was closed and used as a dormitory for U.S. military pilots training at the Bishop Airport. After the war, the dining room was remodeled and reopened as the Copper Kettle Coffee Shop, which was known far and wide for its excellent food and extensive Royal Doulton Toby Jug Collection. The Kittie Lee Inn was torn down in 1965 to make way for a new dinner house known as the Carriage Room. Its Bar, Charlie’s Room, remained in operation.

    In 1976, Sam and Shelly Walker purchased the business from Will Whorff, son of the original owner of the Kittie Lee, and changed the name to Whiskey Creek. In 1999, the Walkers sold the business to its new owner, Greg Alexander….and a new era began.

    The second half of the mural is dedicated to some local Bishop Mural Society members William Whorff, Mazle Whorff, and Sam Walker

    Please check with the Bishop Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau
    690 N. Main Street, Bishop , CA 93514

    Kittie Lee Inn 1924 Bishop Mural Society Members
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    Dangerous Arrest - 1887 Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2015

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    The mural "Old West" event from the Bishop's early years.

    The Shooting
    For the first time in many months the peace and calm of the town were disturbed by a succession of pistols shots last Saturday night. The shots were fired by Officer Plumley in arresting one Phillip Staiger for disorderly conduct and it was certainly a justifiable case.

    The Circumstances
    Staiger went into Springsteads Saloon, and being drunk became abusive. Officer Plumley was appealed to and put Staiger out. Staiger was quiet for awhile, but went away and hunted up a pistol. He afterwards commenced to threaten persons on the street, in fact, did draw his pistol on David Hall. Plumley went to hunt him up and found him in the Headquarters Saloon. He searched Staiger, but found no weapon. Staiger went out into the street and became abusive. Plumley started to arrest him. Staiger presented a gun, and told him to stop. Plumley then drew his pistol and fired a shot by way of a frightener. It didn’t work that way though. Plumley fired three more shots to scare his man, but this man refused to scare. Concluding that it was time to act decidedly, the next shot was fired to hit. The bullet just furrowed along his neck, not seriously injuring him. The officer at once closed in on Staiger and handcuffed him. The charge against the prisoner is for resisting an officer. Had his pistol worked satisfactory, Plumley could not have afforded to waste so much time. Staiger’s examination commenced Tuesday before Justice I.P. Yaney and it is not yet concluded. District Attorney Forbes is prosecuting and W.P. George is engaged in the defense.

    Painted by Kathy Sexton, Rich Perkins, Jenna Morgenstein, John Knowlton and Mary Gipson Knowlton.

    Picture 4 & 5 Dedicated to:
    Officer Richard E. Perkins Memorial
    1949 - 2001
    This mural was created by and dedicated to Officer Richard R. "Rich" Perkins
    who died in the "line of duty" on August 15, 2001
    He was loved by all.
    The Angel of Lizard Gulch
    by Joan Scott

    Please check with the Bishop Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau
    690 N. Main Street, Bishop , CA 93514

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    Historical Walking Tour~

    by Yaqui Updated Oct 13, 2013

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    Bishop has many wonderful historical buildings. To fully enjoy them check with the Chamber of Commerce to get a historical walking tour map. Many of the homes are private residence, so respect their privacy.

    Please check with the Bishop Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau
    690 N. Main Street, Bishop , CA 93514

    Historic Walking Tour Pamphlet

    McNally House 1903
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    Have Your Favorite Drink at Hot Creek

    by tomatohead Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I like Hot Creek because no matter how big your party, there's room for you. The smaller tubs are great, but sometimes there are space/privacy/people's tackle in your face issues.

    We run into the most interesting folks at Hot Creek, from old Brits on holiday to locals we hadn't run into in ages. Also, since it's not a nudie place, you can bring your favorite puritan.

    It's not too sulfury either! Closes at dusk.

    Please leave your glass at home. Bring a towel. Keep your dogs on a leash. It's worth having a look at the site below for the typical warnings. I am generally v. cautious and do not fear bathing at Hot Creek.

    Right before a white out blew threw
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    FIRST STOP...VISITORS CENTER

    by travelgourmet Updated Dec 21, 2010

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    Arriving in Bishop, California, the first stop should be the Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center on Hwy 395. Sitting next to a creek, the A frame building houses all the information and maps you will need to get a full appreciation of this part of California's history and beauty. It is well worth the time spent before heading out and about Bishop.
    One of the friendly faces that greeted me inside the A frame, filled me with enthusiastic facts about the area. I left knowing I was going to enjoy my stay in the Bishop area with more to see than I imagined.

    Bishop Area Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau This room has the answers for Bishop
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    FALL COLOR IN BISHOP AREA

    by travelgourmet Updated Dec 21, 2010

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    Bishop has perhaps the most cottonwood and aspen trees I have ever seen. Late September to the end of October and these trees turn to gold.

    Entering Bishop on Hwy 395 during this time frame and the leaves are gold. Gold in town, for the shops get the tourists and the tourist dollar. The gold of the trees brings in tourists with every type, size, and shape of camera to record for all time these autumn leaves of gold.

    Take Hwy 168 from Hwy 395 to Lake Sabrina in September to early October for the yellowing of trees.

    Closer in, off the Bishop Creek and side roads off West Line Street till the end of October and reds and yellows are still in sight. Hwy 395 , north of Bishop, to Convict Lake, before Mammoth Lakes, and north of Mammoth on Hwy 395 to the June Lake Loop Road past Grant Lake has some brilliant displays of Aspen in all colors till late October, as well.

    So see you in September, Bishop, when the falling leaves of gold are still on the limb.

    Brilliant Yellow Green, Red, Gold, Yellow Leaves of Fall Fall is in the air Fishing season is almost over at Grant Lake THE HILLS COME ALIVE
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    Pine Creek Mine Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 28, 2009

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    West of this spot, gold was discovered in the Pine Creek drainage by Civil War veterans. It was not until April, 1916, when tungsten was discovered by four men: O.E. Vaughn, A.E. & C.C. Beauregard, and James Sproul on their claims, Blizzard 1, 2, 3 and 4, high on the mountain. Years of development and production went by and the mine was acquired by U.S. Vanadium, a division of Union Carbide Corp., on May 14, 1936. After more development, this mine became the world's largest tungsten mine and is now known as the "Mine in the Sky".

    Dedicated June 27, 1987
    E Clampus Vitus
    Slim Princess No. 395

    Marker is on Highway 395 next to a wonderful vista point pullout.

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