Bishop Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui

Best Rated Things to Do in Bishop

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    Middle Fork Bishop Creek lake basin

    by mtncorg Written May 6, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The trailheads for both North and South Lakes -on appropriately, the North and South Forks of Bishop Creek - are trailheads for major Sierran trails which go serve for going over the Sierran crest. Each of those trails sport several very pretty lakes. But for the best lakes in the area, go to the trailhead which begins at the end of CA 168 at Lake Sabrina. This trail goes up the watershed of the Middle Fork and unlike the other two trails, it deadends on the eastern side of the Sierran crest. From the roadend, 9080 feet, you come to the first lake after about 3 miles, Blue Lake, 10420 feet. The Thompson Ridge raise high on the SE edge of the lake. It has wonderful campsites and a sidetrail will take you to Donkey and Baboon Lakes, but the main trail goes right and in a couple more miles it reaches the heart of the lake basin - Dingleberry, Midnight, Topsy Turvy, Moonlight Lakes. Mt Darwin, Mt Haeckel and their fellows rise high above. Just ahead lies the lake with the great moniker of Drunken Sailor Lake - see the picture from the Bishop introduction.

    Thompson Ridge rising above Blue Lake
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Fishing
    • Camping

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    Middle Fork Bishop Creek lake basin II

    by mtncorg Written May 6, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A little over 6 miles from the Lake Sabrina trailhead, lies Hungry Packer Lake. The trail ends here beside this glorious alpine lake, mounatins surrounding. A crosscountry route does go on but the pass crossing is difficult and most will be happy to absorb the scenery from the lake here, 11100 feet high.

    Sierran Peaks rise high above Hungry Packer Lake
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Camping
    • Fishing

    Was this review helpful?

  • tomatohead's Profile Photo

    Walk up to Paiuite Pass

    by tomatohead Updated Sep 3, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you are fit and not prone to altitude sickness, take an afternoon out of your trip and walk up to Paiute Pass. Humphreys Basin is my favorite place in the Sierras. You pass lush sub alpine and critter filled alpine zones to get there.

    You can walk to the pass from June (most years) to November (most years).

    The trailhead is out of North Lake. Park near the packstation.

    About 3 hours walk up and 2 hours down if you are a fit-ish hiker.

    thanks cal and marsha for the pic
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    The Slim Princess Mural

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Slim Princess “Engine 9” was built in 1909 and first saw service on the 36 inch narrow gauge rails (standard gauge is 4 feet 8 ½ inches) of the Nevada, California and Oregon Railroad. It came to the Mina Branch of the Southern Pacific in 1929 and ran from Mina to Keeler until 1938.

    In it’s early years, the Slim Princess (no one knows the origin of the name) carried passengers as well as mining and agricultural outputs. However, with the advent of highways and standard track, the decline in mining, the lines were abandoned and in 1945 the rails were taken up for the Second World War.

    In 1954 S.P. purchases a diesel engine so the remaining 3 steam engines (which could burn up to 800 gallons of oil per round trip from Laws to Keeler) were retired. No. 9 ran under her own power for the last time in 1959 and was then kept as a standby. It was seen in several movies shot in the area including John Wayne’s “The Three Godfathers”.

    The Slim Princess was donated to Inyo County and along with the depot, water tower, turntable, etc., it formed the nucleus of the Laws Museum and Historical Site. Its located 5 miles north of Bishop on Highway 6.

    Painted by by Robert Thomas, John Knowlton and Richard Perkins.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Rock Creek

    by goingsolo Updated Jun 25, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Rock Creek Recreation area is about 30 minutes north of Bishop. This is a scenic area that is great for hiking. If you're planning to head to Mt. Whitney, its a good idea to spend some time, and even a night here. The rock creek road ends at Mosquito Flat and here begins the trail to Little Lakes Valley. At 10,000 feet, you'll have a chance to adjust to the thin air.

    The Rock Creek Lodge has rooms available, but there are few and they fill up quickly. There is a campground here which is a more scenic and cost effective option to the pricey hotels in Bishop.

    I'd planned to spend the night here, doing a daytime Whitney prep and exploring the area. But when T.S. Ernesto forced me to leave a day later, I had to bag this section of the trip. I made it back here in June, 2007 and saw what I'd missed. I'd highly recommend it to anyone who's heading to Whitney. Its a pretty area that's worth a stop and your lungs and head will thank you if you give yourself some time to adjust to the altitude.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Camping
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Spring north to Bishop

    by JLBG Written Feb 10, 2009

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These two photos show the mountain range, north to Bishop. Sorry, I am unable to name these summits. Photo 1 might be White Mountain Peak but I would not give my head for that! Anybody can name these mountains? Help!

    Spring north to Bishop Spring north to Bishop
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Mountain Climbing

    Was this review helpful?

  • tomatohead's Profile Photo

    Evil Red Horse

    by tomatohead Updated Aug 28, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As you approach from the South end of town, an effigy of a red horse with white eyes greets you. It's kind of a weird juxtaposition, having just passed the huge sign with the names of all our local churches (of which there are heaps).

    I love the evil red horse.

    If you need some very very fancy and expensive Packer//Western gear or some feed for your livestock, stop in at the attached store.

    down boy
    Related to:
    • Horse Riding

    Was this review helpful?

  • tomatohead's Profile Photo

    Have Your Favorite Drink at Hot Creek

    by tomatohead Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I like Hot Creek because no matter how big your party, there's room for you. The smaller tubs are great, but sometimes there are space/privacy/people's tackle in your face issues.

    We run into the most interesting folks at Hot Creek, from old Brits on holiday to locals we hadn't run into in ages. Also, since it's not a nudie place, you can bring your favorite puritan.

    It's not too sulfury either! Closes at dusk.

    Please leave your glass at home. Bring a towel. Keep your dogs on a leash. It's worth having a look at the site below for the typical warnings. I am generally v. cautious and do not fear bathing at Hot Creek.

    Right before a white out blew threw
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tomatohead's Profile Photo

    Say "Howdy" to a Mule

    by tomatohead Written Aug 28, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bishop is the self-described Mule Capital of the World (there appear to be many).

    Mule Days, which includes the country's largest non-motorized parade, is held every Memorial Day Weekend.

    Actually, Mule Days was started by the local packers who wanted to drum up more business with the vacationers from "down south" (LA) and the Bay Area.

    Mules are lovely creatures AND smarter than horses.

    friendly guy
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Inyo Mono Title Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The artist of this mural, John Pugh of Los Gatos, California is universally recognized as a master of the illustionary aspect of painting, know as Trompe L'oeil (fool the eye).

    He named this mural "Young at Heart' because of its depiction of the areas early history through an actual land title that seems to have been peeled back to reveal that history through various soil strata.

    The first represents European involvement showing artifacts such as water wheel, bullets and gold veins. A second stratum depicts elements of the life of the local Pauite Indian Tribe. Further back in history is shown through fossilized remains of animals and other organisms, such as mastodon tusks and roots of the oldest living organisms, the Bristlecone Pines. At the top of the mural, Mr. Pugh shows us a very real dog that grounds the mural and provides a playful element.

    Bishop Mural Society 2002, Artist John Pugh.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Drain Mural

    by Yaqui Updated Jan 18, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    No single event in the last 100 years has had such a dramatic and lasting effect on Bishop than the draining of Owens Valley. In providing more water for Los Angeles the result here was the loss of a vast fertile land. Here too, was a great loss of life and the loss of a great life. And here in the drying fields, a war of rights was waged whose embers still glow undoused even today. These are historical facts.
    Don't get me wrong; Bishop is an incredibl friendly town surrounded by majestic beauty. Yet the town was forever changed when the water rights changed hands.

    Exploring History through Murals is the charter of the Bishop Mural Society, and the charter of this artist to explore that history and express with fresh infusion a fabric that is this place. The tapestry of Bishop is dynamic, woven with light and dark threads. When the curtain opens in 1913, it is water that has the starring role.

    In this piece entitiled Drain, an agricultural Shangri La appears as a mural within a mural. This vision of the valley's past derives from old painting and photos, book desriptions, interviews, and visits to the less effected areas of Owens Valley. Breathing sweet orchard blossoms while gazing at the lush glory of this place 100 years ago, this depiction is not meant to portray a specific vantage point yet rather allow the viewer an ambient experience of the ecology.

    If your eyes are diverted to the drainpipe, this is by design. Like a black hole that allows no light to escape, the protruding drainpipe absorbs all color in its proximity. The odd shape surrounding the pipe is actually a preserved section of the under painting, but conceptually serves as an after image, or 'ghost blotch'. It is a stain that is createc by the absence of color information - or metaphorically, of life. Written words like 'water' and 'tree' or even 'green' are some of the sketch notes, but historically these are the line items that have virtually disappeared into the drain.

    Painted by John Pugh

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Father Crowley Mural

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Father John Crowley remains a legendary figure, recognized as the visionary leader who saw the potential for the region, and as a man of faith who dedicated his life to helping its inhabitants. The “Desert Padre” was born in Ireland in 1891. He is shown here with his dog “Tray” and the Model T Ford in which he traveled up to 16 hours a day along the dirt roads from Bishop to Barstow. Each year on opening day of trout season, he blessed fishing equipment. Father Crowley brought national attention to the Owens Valley with an event called “Wedding of the Waters.” At one point, Fr. Crowley actually locked chief water engineer H.C. Van Norman in a meeting room until the exasperated engineer conceded to requests to build a new dam that would restore water to the impoverished desert. Crowley Lake was named after him.

    Painted by John Knowlton, Mary Gipson-Knowlton, Kathy Sexton, Jenna Morgenstein and Pat Morgan

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Celebrating the Sierra

    by Yaqui Written Jan 18, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This natural history mural of ceramic tiles and mosaic contains 237 species of flora and fauna dwelling in the Eastern Sierra. Each unique tile was hand sculpted and painted by one of 216 community members in a directed collaboration. The mural is dedicated to the committed volunteers of Inyo County Search and Rescue, in appreciation for their service to the community.

    Painted by Patty Holton, Betty Cameron, Susanne Olson, Margaret Phelps, Sara Steck, Coleen Randolph, Earl Gann, Carolyn Lynch,& Carol Conner-Turner.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Mosquito Flats/Little Lakes Valley

    by goingsolo Written Jun 25, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Less than a half hours drive from Bishop, you'll find Little Lakes valley. At 10,000 feet, you'll probably feel a bit lightheaded. If the altitude doesn't get you, then the summertime mosquitos certainly will. Little Lakes Valley is the perfect place for a dayhike and a good place to acclimitize if you've got Whitney or another high peak in your sights.

    For more information, feel free to browse my Mammoth Lakes page.

    Little Lakes Valley
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Fishing

    by lvs2trvl Updated May 31, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Some of the best fishing in California can be found in and around the Owens Valley. The Owens River offers many types of fish with an abundance of trout (rainbow, brook and brown), and some big & small mouth bass. There are hundreds of places along the river that are easily accessible by a regular 2 wheeldrive car. Of course, there are as many more you can get to in a 4 wheel drive. There are also dozens of lakes within an hour or so from Bishop. Fishing on the lakes is only open from the beginning of April to the end of October - but the river is open year-round. It truly is a fisherman's paradise.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • Horse Riding
    • Fishing

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bishop

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

18 travelers online now

Comments

Bishop Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Bishop things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bishop sightseeing.

View all Bishop hotels