Flora / Fauna, Death Valley National Park

28 Reviews

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  • Death Valley, Chuckwalla lizard
    Death Valley, Chuckwalla lizard
    by Martinewezel
  • Desert Five-Spot
    Desert Five-Spot
    by mcpangie
  • Gravel Ghost
    Gravel Ghost
    by mcpangie
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    Cuscuta

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: This a Cuscuta, a parasit plant that sucks another plant. It has no leaves, no roots, no chlorophylle, only long stems with sucking devices at the end. It hugs the plant it has chosen, introduce its sucking devices in its stems and sucks the sap of its host. BTW, Cuscuta grow everywhere in the world and you might find one close to home.

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    Desert velvet

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: It is called the Desert velvet (Psathyrotes ramosissima). The stems are very short and on this picture, you can see the leaves as this small hairy features and one flower which is sprouting out of the protection. It is going to waste a lot of water, but it is to allow reproduction !

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    Desert mallow

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: If you take an even closer look, the flowers of the Desert mallow are superb, very delicate and it is amazing that such delicate flowers grow on a half dry shrub in such a harsh environment. Actually, many desert flowers are very delicate and fragile, making a strong contrast with their environment.

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    Beavertail cactus

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Beavertail cactus Opuntia basilaris is a very common cactus in the Death Valley and is also well known as an indoor plant all over the world. Everybody that have once grown indoor plant has grown a Beavertail cactus, which means that it is easy to grow and requires little care

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    Amazing stone !

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: This picture, taken at Furnace creek, shows something that looks almost like a stone but if you take a closer look, you will discover that the "stone" has small flowers and that it is a plant that it has adapted to the dry environment and to lessen its evaporation, has taken this shape.

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    Desert daisy

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: At Furnace creek, this plant, that looks almost like a Daisy, a Desert Daisy, is called Tidy tip (Layia glandulosa) and is a close relative to the daisy. It succeed in growing among stones, which our temperate climate Daisies would be unable to do !

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    Pollution ?

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Who has thrown out of his car a packet of nylon orange threads near Mesquite Junction ? It is illegal, especially in a National park and that is worth a heavy fine ! We should collect it and throw it into a garbage bin ! Waite a minute, this is not a refuse but a parasit plant !!

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    Teddy Bear cactus , close up on the flowers

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Actually, the Jumping Cholla does not jump but it has so many long and soft (soft and prickling all together !) spines that though you feel you are enough away, YOU catch it. If you take care, you will be able to admire it's beautiful yellow flowers.

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    Barrel cactus

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Barrel cactus (Echinocactus acanthoides) is another kind of cactus. They are not "aggressive" as the Teddy Bear cactus and they are sometimes grown as indoor plants. Again, you will be either very lucky or a good gardener if you happen to get its flowers.

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    Teddy Bear cactus

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Teddy Bear cactus ( Opuntia Bigelovii ) is also called Jumping Cholla. You will very fast understand why the name of Jumping Cholla . As soon as you look at it, there is one that catches you ! No wonder that it is not a popular indoor plant !

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    A white poppy

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: I took the photo of this delicate poppy in Titus canyon. It is called Bear poppy (Arctomecon Meriami). Its leaves look like the fur of a bear and you feel like to fondle them. The flowers were not fully open and I looked for another one.

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    Another white poppy

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Here it is, at a short distance from the first one. But, hey, it is not smoth as the previous one ! It is mimicking a cactus and indeed it is called the Prickly poppy (Argemone corymbosa). This one you have better not to fondle !

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    Beavertail cactus, close up on the flowers

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: However, at home, Beavertail cactus seldom gives flowers. Only the wise indoor gardeners get them. They are splendid bright red and in the wild, in the Death Valley, in April, all plants had flowers. Nature is more clever than man !

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    Joshua Trees

    by travelgirl3 Updated Nov 23, 2004

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    Joshua Trees, Death Valley, California

    Favorite thing: Even though it can look very desolate, you will find a lot of life in Death Valley, including the Joshua Tree. It is the largest of the Yuccas, and grows only in the Mojave Desert in California, Nevada, Utah and Arizona. They can grow to a height of of 40' and can be up to 3' in diameter.

    According to legend, they were named by the Mormons heading west, as they felt the upreaching branches were a sign from the prophet Joshua, urging them on to the Promised Land.

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    Shrub ?

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Favorite thing: From a certain distance, it looks at any other uninteresting brownish reddish shrub. However, if you take a closer look, you will discover the Desert mallow (Sphaeralcea ambigua) with many small red flowers.

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