Other Points of Interest, Death Valley National Park

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  • Other Points of Interest
    by Yaqui
  • Other Points of Interest
    by Yaqui
  • Other Points of Interest
    by Yaqui
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    Jayhawkers Canyon

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 31, 2010

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    Favorite thing: Just another wonderful place to explore is Jayhawkers Canyon.
    Beginning Elevation: 3,000 Feet
    Difficulty: Moderate
    Elevation Gain: 2,600 Feet
    Length, One-way: 5 Miles
    USGS Maps: Emigrant Canyon
    Reservation: No
    Season: Mid-September - Mid-May

    Directions
    From Furnace Creek, Travel northward on Highway 190 33 miles to Emigrant Campground. Continue driving westward on Highway 190 to the 3,000 feet above sea level marker. Park here and find the trail on the eastern side of the road.

    Location Information
    The Jayhawker Canyon Trail begins on Highway 190 at the 3,000 feet above sea level marker, which is 2.3 miles past Emigrant Junction. The route follows the path of emigrants who traveled through the region in 1850 on their way to California. You'll see the signatures of some of the emigrants who carved their names on a large boulder about two miles in from the highway. The Jayhawker Canyon drainage leads five miles to the southeast to the base of Pinto Peak. It is a gentle grade with little navigational skills needed to wander through the canyon. Because of the low elevation, this trail is not recommended for summer use. Bring lots of water in preparation for the extreme heat.http://travel.yahoo.com/p-parks-225522-jayhawker_canyon_death_valley_hiking_walking-i

    Death Valley Direction and Information

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

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    Corkscrew Peak

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 31, 2010

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    Favorite thing: Corkscrew Peak is the towering sentinel of the Grapevine Mountains of northern Death Valley National Park. Corkscrew Peak derives its name from the twisting, corkscrew-like exposures of the Lower Cambrian Corkscrew Quartzite. It juts out from behind the Grapevine Mountains. There is a sign that points to it while traveling along 374 East toward Nevada. It is an impressive peak.

    Lat/Lon: 36.77000°N / 117.0031°W
    Elevation: 5804 ft / 1769 m

    Death Valley Directions and Information

    Map with wonderful information

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Hell's Gate

    by Yaqui Written Dec 31, 2010

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    Favorite thing: I can only surmise that name comes from how a pioneer might see it as they enter from the east to such desolated surrounding and what it was going to take to cross it. I am sure stories abound of those who entered,lived, crossed, or didn't make it. Records back then didn't keep track of everyone who may have perished here. Sadly, people still perish here because they come so unprepared and do Not Heed the Warnings of not taking certain Safety Precautions.

    The vista's from Hell's Gate you can see at the intersection of 374 and 190 on the east area of the park. A real beautiful view.

    Death Valley Directions and Information

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    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

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    SALINE VALLEY

    by Sharrie Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Favorite thing: SALINE VALLEY.

    Bring along lots of water with you, just in case :-D With a 200-square-mile salt pan surrounded by mountains, this is one of America's greatest vertical rises!

    Fondest memory: Hey! This is DEATH Valley - Fondest memory? Are you kidding? :-)))

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Titus Canyon

    by mht_in_la Written Nov 30, 2003

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    Titus Canyon

    Favorite thing: With 1,000-foot vertical walls in areas only separated by the width of road, Titus Canyon is arguably the most scenic backcountry drive in Death Valley. It's located 27 miles northeast of Stovepipe Wells via Route 190. Or you can visit from the east and enter the one-way dirt road about 7 miles east of the Nevada state line. Either way the dirt-road driving is very harsh to the car.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Lots of palm trees

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 7, 2003

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    Palm trees in Furnace Creek Ranch

    Favorite thing: Furnace Creek Ranch has palm trees. Lots of them. In the middle of a hot, dry desert, the palm trees seem to tell the travellers they have just found an oasis. With the adjacent golf course and all that, for a while I thought I was in Palm Springs.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

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    visit the famed Zabriskie...

    by Sergiuz Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Favorite thing: visit the famed Zabriskie Point. Apart from being the source of inspiration for some artists (from the homonymous Michelangelo Antonioni's movie with the soundtrack played by the Pink Floyd, to one of the U2's 'Joshua Tree' album photos...), this spot shall provide you one of the most 'desolate' and at a time wonderful sights over the Valley panorama. Just below the sightseeing point is the Golden Canyon, formed by astonishing colorful rocks rounded by erosion; you can also enjoy an astonishing view of The Furnace Creek formation badlands. Beyond the rocks you can get a first glimpse of the great central dry basin in which are the Devil's Golf Course (see below) and the salt pool of Badwater (see below).

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    go and have a look of the...

    by Sergiuz Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Favorite thing: go and have a look of the Valley from Dante's View, located at 5475 ft. height. Probably it could be your first stop if you're coming from south-east, running Route 190 after arriving at Death Valley Junction (see map on this page), and it let you get a unique scenic overview of the area.

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    Sergiuz's General Tip

    by Sergiuz Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Fondest memory: From the overlook at Dante's View, you can see Badwater directly below, which is the exact point where the Valley lowers to 282 feet below sea level. Moreover, from there you can enjoy spectacular views across the whole Valley of the Panamint Range and the surrounding mountains. I've been told that, on clear winter days, it is also possible to see the highest mountain in the contiguous U.S., Mount Whitney at 14,011 feet.

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    Salt Creek

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 7, 2004
    Salt Creek

    Favorite thing: This area is unique if for no other reason than that water can be found here. Not a lot, but a marshy swampy area which hardly qualifies as a body of water yet is enough to sustain life. Its amazing how nature will struggle against the harshest of elements and continue to bear fruit, even under such adverse conditions.

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    The Road to Stovepipe Wells and Panamint Springs

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 7, 2004
    Death Valley National Park

    Favorite thing: Stovepipe Wells and Panamint Springs are located in the northern section of the park. Here you'll find higher elevation, mountains and some of the most scenic areas of the park. Due to its higher elevations, certain portions of this area may be closed off in the winter due to snowfall.

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    Wildrose Canyon

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 9, 2004
    Death Valley National Park

    Favorite thing: Wildrose Canyon is a scenic detour which steeply winds its way through Emigrant Canyon before ending at the Wildrose Charcoal Kilns and the trails leading to Telescope and Wildrose Peaks. The road is not advised for RVs and motorhomes as it is extremely narrow in some places, but its a beautiful drvie for anyone in a passenger vehicle. Another point of interest along the Wildrose Canyon Road is the turnoff for the dirt road leading to Skidoo, one of the abandoned mining camps now known as a ghost town.

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    Charcoal Kilns at Wildrose Canyon

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 8, 2004
    Death Valley National Park

    Favorite thing: The Wildrose Canyon Road terminates at the area where the kilns are located. Like most remnants still standing in Death Valley, the kilns were used for mining. They stand approximately 25 feet tall and about 30 feet wide. The kilns don't do anything as mining operations ceased about a year after they began in the late 1800s.

    But many people like to come out here and look at the kilns. Keep in mind that the road leading out to the kilns is unpaved for the last 3 miles and may be closed in the event of a storm. When I visited, the last part of the road was impassible. At least it was for a Floridian driving an SUV. I didn't see any road closure signs, but, then again, I didn't see any other cars either. Its a good idea to check on road conditions before making the drive out here, especially if you're traveling anytime between late October and early May.

    Fondest memory: Sliding along on a sheet of ice damn well wasn't by fondest memory, but I suppose it'll be good for a laugh someday.

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    Panamint Springs

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 9, 2004
    Death Valley National Park

    Favorite thing: Panamint Springs is a tiny town along hwy that borders Death Valley. From here, the road continues to Wildrose and Echo Canyons, and eventually to Stovepipe Wells. This place is an alternative to staying in the park and is located at the beginning or end (depending on where your point of origin is) of a scenic drive.

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    Salt Creek Interpretive Trail

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 9, 2004
    Death Valley National Park

    Favorite thing: The Salt Creek Interpretive Trail is a 1/2 mile walk on a boardwalk which passes salt creek and some of the vegetation that can actually grow in the area. The pupfish, a unique animal found in Salt Creek, can be found here. For some reason, the pupfish only makes an appearance during certain months of the year. According to the sign I saw, pupfish viewing doesn't begin until the month of February.

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