Badwater, Death Valley National Park

4.5 out of 5 stars 42 Reviews

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  • Badwater
    by blueskyjohn
  • Badwater
    by blueskyjohn
  • Badwater
    by blueskyjohn
  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Badwater - the hottest and lowest part in the park

    by Trekki Updated Aug 27, 2005

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    Badwater

    Badwater is not only the hottest point in this park - and probably the most visited - but also the lowest point in the western part of this globe.
    It's located 85 m ( 285 ft ) below sea level.

    It's name is coming from the high salt content of the water.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Amazing scultures at Badwater.

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Amazing scultures at Badwater.

    Around Badwater, rocks carved by the wind have amazing shapes. This one looks as a lion groomed black poodle sniffing the air! Others are looking like black ghosts or gigantic mushrooms The wind has taken millions of years to succeed such carvings.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Bad water composition

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Badwater composition

    This is really bad water ! If you enlarge the photo, it will give you the comparison of the salt content of Badwater's and of sea water. Badwater has more sodium, more potassium and more calcium. It has less chloride but more sulfate and carbonate. Sea water taste better than badwater's !

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Badwater 1980

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

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    Badwater

    Here we are in Badwater. This picture was taken in 1980 and the elevation was 280 feet under sea level. In 2003, it was 282 feet and it keeps sinking ! The pressure of the air is heavier than at sea level but it does not make any difference that could be felt.

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  • goingsolo's Profile Photo

    Badwater

    by goingsolo Updated Dec 6, 2004

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    Death Valley National Park

    Badwater is a must see spot for those who are fascinated by superlatives. At 282 feet below sea level, it is the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere. It is also one of the hottest spots on Earth, temperature-wise, that is. The lowest lying of all areas often reaches a scorching 120 degrees fahrenheit. In late November, its the perfect place for a short stroll, if only to say that you've been to the lowest point.

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  • travelgirl3's Profile Photo

    Badwater

    by travelgirl3 Updated Nov 23, 2004

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    Badwater, Death Valley, California

    At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest place not only in the continental USA, but in the Western Hemisphere. Because temperature increases as elevation decreases, Badwater is also one of the hottest places on earth. Temperatures of 120 are not unusual during the summer months and in July, 1913 it soared to 134, a world record at that time.

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  • Combinedefx's Profile Photo

    We can say we were there

    by Combinedefx Written Jun 20, 2004

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    Salt flat

    We stopped briefly to make it to the lowest point in the U.S.
    Otherwise it was not much to see, except for the dry, salty cracks in the earth. One can walk out into the salt flats, a barren wasteland, if one so desires!

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  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    Badwater - feeling hot, hot, hot

    by JanPeter74 Updated Apr 21, 2004

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    Badwater

    Badwater is the lowest point in the western hemisphere and also one of the hottest recorded places in the world.

    Badwater is a small pool at an elevation of 280 feet / 85 meter below sea level. A standard photostop when driving through Death Valley. The low, salty pool at Badwater, just beside the main park road is probably the best known and most visited place in Death Valley.

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  • mht_in_la's Profile Photo

    Badwater in 2001

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 4, 2003

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    Badwater - 2001

    The photo was taken in 2001 when I visited Death Valley for the first time. Notice the boardwalk was not built yet. And the sign said "280 feet below sea level". Today this area continues to drop and is now 282 feet below sea level (as of Nov 2003). In speaking to the park rangers, the boardwalk was added last year to protect the sensitive enrivonment from tourists.

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  • mht_in_la's Profile Photo

    The lowest point in your life?

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 1, 2003

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    Lowest elevations around the world

    Badwater, at 282 feet below sea level, is the lowest elevation in the western hemisphere. To most visitors, this is probably the lowest point in their life. Unless you are a professional diver or work in a submarine, you are not likely to get any lower than this. But Badwater is not alone. There are other places around the world that are below sea level. The photo is a display in Badwater showing the earth's lowest, including Salton Sea (-227 feet) in southern California along the same faultline as Badwater. The lowest in the world is Dead Sea (-1,360 feet) in Jordan.

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  • mht_in_la's Profile Photo

    Badwater in 2003

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 1, 2003

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    Badwater - 2003

    Compare this photo (taken in Nov 2003) with my previous tip photo (taken in summer 2001) to see the change in the area. Besides the addition of the boardwalk, many interpretive displays were also added. Visitors can stay on boardwalk without getting their feet wet, or they can walk down to salt flats for a hike.

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  • mht_in_la's Profile Photo

    It's bad and it's wet

    by mht_in_la Written Nov 30, 2003

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    Badwater pool

    One would wonder why Badwater pool is never dry, even in the summer when everything evaporates under the sun? The secret is in the ancient aquafer. Much of it began as Ice Age snow and rain hundreds of miles away in the mountains of central Nevada. The runoff seeped into porous limestone bedrock and began a long underground flow through a regional aquafer. It emerges at Badwater along the faultline at the mountain's base. Salts dissolve from old deposit and flow to the surface, making the spring water "bad".

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  • annk's Profile Photo

    Not much but a salty pool

    by annk Written Nov 30, 2003

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    Badwater

    Badwater - There really isin't much to see here except for a low salty pool. Several trails lead to other pools and during rainy periods a large shallow lake forms only to evaporate quickly. It never dries out completely and even supports the Death Valley pupfish and a species of mollusk. I did not see either.

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  • annk's Profile Photo

    The lowest point in North America

    by annk Written Nov 30, 2003

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    Badwater

    One of the most visited places in Death Valley. Named "Badwater" when a prospector led his mule to the shallow lake and he refused to drink the water.

    Although the sign indicates the lowest point at 282 ft. below sea level, the actual lowest point is several miles away and not easily accessible.

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  • Andraf's Profile Photo

    Badwater

    by Andraf Updated Nov 1, 2003

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    Badwater, Death Valley

    Badwater is the lowest point in the western hemisphere, 282 ft (85m) below sea level. This place is also very very hot. There's a small pool of water which surprisingly hosts life (if we were to believe the signs that mark the spot). Turn around and look up the rocky wall to find the sign that marks the sea level.

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