Scottys Castle, Death Valley National Park

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  • Death Valley, Scotty's Castle
    Death Valley, Scotty's Castle
    by Martinewezel
  • Scottys Castle
    Scottys Castle
    by RAINBOWWINGS
  • Main Hall
    Main Hall
    by Basaic
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    Like a Mirage

    by RAINBOWWINGS Written Jul 9, 2006

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    Scottys Castle

    Like a mirage rising from the desert heat Scottys castle is the only mansion in Death Valley and well worth a visit. The castle was built by Albert Johnson, a Chicago millionaire, who , for health reasons had to move to a warmer climate. But Walter Scott an old prospector and performer with Buffalo Bills Circus show, boasted that he built the castle with the proceeds from a secret gold mine in Death Valley.
    Whatever story you believe its worth the effort. $11 adults and $6 for children entrance fee.

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    Scotty's Castle

    by Martinewezel Written Feb 21, 2012

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    Death Valley, Scotty's Castle

    Scotty’s Castle or Death Valley Ranch
    To me, the best part of Death Valley is North of Furnace Creek, and that's exactly where Scotty's Castle is, located in a beautiful desert oasis . We had a wonderful day out there visiting the beautiful house. A real must see!

    Scotty, who gave his name to the house, was a born cheat to some but a perfect entertainer for others. He hinted at being the owner of the castle, while the real owner was Albert Mussey Johnson.

    Anyway, I won’t bother you with history neither with facts… the tour guide can tell much better stories.

    Start this tour early in the morning, cause it gets busier later in the am/pm. The store sells "plastic" sandwiches, junk food and drinks, so if you don’t like that, take your pic nic. There is a pic nic area on the lawn at the parking lot. Very nice.

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    Furnace Creek Inn

    by lonestar_philomath Updated Jul 30, 2007

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    The Inn, Scotty's Castle
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    The Inn is at the north entrance to the park.

    Built by Albert Mussey Johnson, a Chicago millionaire businessman, naming it his "Death Valley Ranch" and his cowboy mining partner, Scotty, lived there as a guest. Located in the cool of Grapevine Canyon.

    Death Valley National Park
    PO Box 569
    Death Valley, CA 92328

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    Scotty's Castle

    by goingsolo Written Jan 9, 2005

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    Death Valley National Park

    The castle is a popular diversion in the northern portion of the park. Many make the trip to see the castle's Mediterrenean style architecture, striking anywhere but particularly so in this remote desert location. The castle's ingenuity extends beyond its construction and is evident in the implementation of the castle's solar water heating.

    The castle derived its name from Walter Scott- a frequent guest of the wealthy Chicago millionaire Albert Johnson who once owned the castle. Tours of the castle are offered every hour. The tours fill up quickly as this is a popular attraction.

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    Scotty's Castle

    by Tom_Fields Updated May 1, 2007

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    Scotty's Castle
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    Scotty was an adventurer--an experienced prospector, sportsman, and longtime member of Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show. He became friends with the Johnsons, a family from Chicago who had made a fortune speculating in commodities. So he persuaded them to come to Death Valley and invest in a bogus silver mining venture.

    It never really panned out. But the Johnsons loved the area for its climate, and built this Spanish-style home in the middle of the desert. Officially named the Death Valley Ranch, it is better known as Scotty's Castle. Today, it serves as a lodge; it has a snack bar and other basics. Guided tours are given daily.

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    Scotty's Castle

    by PinkFloydActuary Written May 4, 2007

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    Scotty's Castle

    Way the heck at the north end of the park is Scotty's Castle, a mansion that was built in the 1920's. On the grounds, you'll find restrooms (Hallelujah!), a ranger station with a small gift shop, and the opportunity to join a ranger tour of the castle. There's a small hiking trail that has the trailhead in the picnic area right off the parking lot as well. Personally, I wasn't interested in taking the tour, but this is a good place to stop if you are going to enter through the northern part of the park since you can get a map and use the facilities.

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    A hot place to live!

    by Roeffie Updated Aug 22, 2003

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    Scotty's Castle

    Scotty's Castle

    Lies 60 km north of Hwy 178. Scotty’s Castle is a big Mediterranean-style Hacienda built for a millionaire and his eccentric friend, “Death valley Scotty”. Great stories are told about this lovely old building; Guided tours in costume and following local habits are offered daily from 09.00 hrs till 17.00 hrs. Normally the waiting time is approx. 1 hour.

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    Must see Scottys once

    by mht_in_la Updated Apr 4, 2004

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    Scottys Castle

    I was surprised the Park Service runs such a touristy place. I put it in the "must see" section only for the completeness of my visit to Death Valley. But I would suggest you only see it once, especially after I learned about the life of Walter Scott, the guy the castle was named after.

    To go inside the castle you have to join the guided tour. The tour costs $8 (as of Nov, 2003) on top of the $10 park entrance you already paid. If you don't join the tour, outside the castle there's not much to see besides the souvenir shop and a staple. Fortunately, not too far from the castle is Ubehebe Crater, a much more interesting natural wonder that I strongly recommend (see my other tips).

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    Guided tour inside Scottys Castle

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 7, 2003

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    Guided tour inside Scottys Castle

    So I joined the tour. The guide in costume actually looked like Walter Scott!. So who's this Walter Scott character? He was nicknamed Death Valley Scotty, but never struck gold in the valley as he claimed. He's not an entrepreneur who built his own empire. He did not even spend his own money building the castle. Yet his name is now attached to the castle forever. Walter Scott was a run-away boy from Kentucky, and later became a con man in the wild west (literally, as he toured around with Buffalo Bill's "Wild West" show in his early days).

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    Visit Scotty's Castle

    by etfromnc Written Nov 12, 2012
    Scotty's Castle

    In the 1920s Chicago millionaire Albert Johnson was sold the ultimate snake oil – the idea that there was gold in California’s Death Valley. In the dry, scorching conditions the ailing Johnson found something more precious: improved health. So, he built a castle in the desert valley with the second-highest temperature on record. Today, the Spanish-style ranch about 45 miles from the nearest Death Valley settlements looks like a folly, although it’s rather snug behind its sheepskin curtains and with its 1000- pipe theatre organ.
    Guided living-history tours of the main house interior are conducted daily 365 days a year. Tours last approximately 50 minutes and are given at least once every hour from November through mid-April, and less frequently in the summer. Limited to 19 people per tour, the guided tour is the only way to see inside the main house. Ticket prices are $7.50 - $15. Go to www.recreation.gov or call 1-877-444-6777 for advance ticket purchases. Approximately 100,000 people tour the villa each year.
    Scotty's Castle is a two-story Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival style villa located in the Grapevine Mountains of northern Death Valley in Death Valley National Park, California, U.S.A. It is also known as Death Valley Ranch. Scotty's Castle is not a real castle, and it did not belong to the "Scotty" from whom it got its name.
    Construction began on Scotty's Castle in 1922, and cost between $1.5 and $2.5 million. A man named Walter Scott born in Cynthiana, Kentucky, also known as “Death Valley Scotty”, convinced Chicago millionaire Albert Mussey Johnson to invest in his gold mine in the Death Valley area. By 1937, Johnson had acquired more than 1,500 acres in Grapevine Canyon, where the ranch is located.
    After Johnson and his wife made several trips to the region, and his health improved, construction began. It was Mrs. Johnson's idea to build something comfortable for their vacations in the area, and the villa eventually became a winter home.
    The Johnsons hired Martin de Dubovay as the architect, Mat Roy Thompson as the engineer and head of construction, and Charles Alexander MacNeilledge as the designer.
    Unknown to the Johnsons, the initial survey was incorrect, and the land they built Death Valley Ranch on was actually government land; their land was further up Grapevine Canyon. Construction halted as they resolved this mistake, but before it could resume, the stock market crashed in 1929, making it difficult for Johnson to finish construction. Having lost a considerable amount of money, the Johnsons used the Death Valley Ranch to produce income by letting rooms out. The Johnsons died without heirs and had hoped that the National Park Service would purchase the property, and in 1970, the National Park Service purchased the villa for $850,000 from the Gospel Foundation, to which the Johnsons left the property. Walter Scott, who was taken care of by the Gospel Foundation after Johnson's passing, died in 1954 and was buried on the hill overlooking Scotty's Castle next to a beloved dog.

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    Scotty's dining room

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 7, 2003
    Scotty's dining room

    The photo shows the dining room inside the castle. I took a close look at the plates on the table and they all had "J & S" printed on them. J is for Albert Johnson, and S for Walter Scott.

    A millionaire from Chicago, Albert Johnson was the guy who spent the money building the castle. He believed in Scott's gold mine story and made investment with Scott. He never struck gold as Scott promised. But he became attracted to the desert himself so he built the castle to stay here comfortably. When Scott and Johnson were both alive, the castle was occupied by Scott, and Johnson (and his wife Bessie) only stayed here during vacation.

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    Bessie Johnson's bedroom

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 5, 2003
    Bessie Johnson's bedroom

    Inside Scottys Castle we saw Bessie Johnson's bedroom. Bessie was the wife of Albert Johnson, the guy who really built the castle (not Walter Scott). Bessie liked to study in bed, so she designed a folding table as seen in photo. When she's done reading and writing, she can just fold the table up and turn to sleep. Pretty smart design.

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    Indoor waterfall

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 7, 2003
    Indoor waterfall

    Without air condition, how did Scott and Johnson survive the hot desert? Well, inside Scottys Castle we saw this indoor waterfall where cool water was brought in and circulated. This solved both the dryness and the heat problem in the summer. Pretty smart design.

    In fact, if you don't feel you've been conned enough by the $8 guided tour, there's another "technology tour" you can join to see all the innovative designs of the castle.

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    Upper Music Room

    by mht_in_la Updated Apr 4, 2004
    Piano for the dummies

    On the second floor of Scottys Castle you'll find the Upper Music Room. It's the entertainment center of the whole castle. As shown in photo, the Music Room features a rare theater organ, with more than 1000 pipes concealed behind the screen.

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    Scotty's living room

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 7, 2003
    Scotty's living room

    When Walter Scott ran this place in the early 20th Century, it was called Death Valley Ranch. And he used to give castle tours to the visitors for $1.1 each. If he's alive today, he must be happy to know the castle is now named after him, and even happier to know the castle continues to con tourist money as in his time.

    The photo shows the main living room viewed from the second floor. Everything was original: the sofa, the fireplace, the carpet, and the chandelier. As we were finishing up our tour, the next group already started.

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