Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley National Park

15 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Stovepipe Wells
    by blueskyjohn
  • Stovepipe Wells
    by blueskyjohn
  • Stovepipe Wells
    by blueskyjohn
  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Stovepipe Wells Village

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 29, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The orginal historical site of Stovepipe is 3 miles north of state route 190. It was named because of the 5 feet of stovepipe pushed into a well. It was one of the main stops for stagecoaches and supplies trains has they travel through DV.

    Stovepipe Wells Village

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Nice Rest Stop

    by Basaic Written Feb 16, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stovepipe Wells General Store
    1 more image

    A nice place to stop for a rest break as you drive through the park is Stovepipe Wells Village. Here you will find a nice inn, a place to eat and a place to find a beer (which is very welcome on a typical 120 degree day). There is also a Visitor’s Center and a store for buying provisions and gas.

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Old Dinah

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Old Dinah

    In 1894, steam tractor and ore wagons were introduced at old borate to replace the twenty mule teams. The tractor was later used and abandoned on the Beatty-Keane wonder mine road. The steam tractor was later replaced by a railroad.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Andraf's Profile Photo

    Stovepipe Wells Sand Dunes

    by Andraf Updated Nov 1, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stovepipe Wells Sand Dunes, Death Valley

    Located very close to Stovepipe Wells are the undulating sand dunes. They are being continually recreated by the winds which carry sand from the mountains and then deposit it here. The dunes can be explored by foot (park on the side of the road). There is no trail, but that is part of the fun, you can create your own trail.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    Sand Dunes at Stovepipe Wells

    by JanPeter74 Written Apr 21, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sand dunes at Stovepipe Wells

    If you want to see real desert sand dunes, you have to stop by Stovepipe Wells. The dunes start by the roadside and you can walk as far as you like.

    Here you will find a great landscape of sand dunes, combined with bushes, some small salt plains, and the mountains in the background.

    If you want a picture without lots of footprints in the sand, you will most likely have to walk for at least 20 minutes or so.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • Alice-Kees's Profile Photo

    The desert as we know it

    by Alice-Kees Written Jun 29, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sand dunes, Death Valley National Park

    The Sand Dunes are best seen and visited from the main road near Stovepipe Wells. We didn't have time to walk up there, but we saw a few people going and returning. So if not on a tight schedule, it's a good idea to stop here and get to see these ever changing sand dunes a bit closer.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Stovepipe

    by JLBG Updated Jan 9, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stovepipe junction

    The more we drive into the Death valley, the less vegetation. Stovepipe junction is still ahead. But why "Stovepipe" ? I can bet that has something to do with the temperature in summer. In April, it is warm but not too much.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Mules wagon

    by JLBG Written Apr 25, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mules wagon

    Mules driven wagons have been kept and are on display. After borax was dug, it was loaded on these wagons. The wagons were drawn by a team of twenty mules that followed the mule team drive (see following tip)

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Eichbaum Toll Rd Calif. Historical Marker No.848

    by Yaqui Written Dec 30, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    It reads: NO. 848 EICHBAUM TOLL ROAD - In 1926, H. W. Eichbaum obtained a franchise for a toll road from Darwin Falls to Stovepipe Wells, the first maintained road into Death Valley from the west. It changed the area's economic base from mining to tourism and brought about the creation of Death Valley National Monument seven years later.

    California Registered Historical Landmark No. 848
    Plaque placed by the State Departments of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the Death Valley 49ers, Inc., November 12, 1971.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • mht_in_la's Profile Photo

    Well, there is a well

    by mht_in_la Updated Dec 1, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stovepipe Well

    Ever wonder where Stovepipe Wells got its name? Well, there is a well. It's located about 9 miles northeast of the town of Stovepipe Wells, just off Route 190. During the bonanza days of Rhyolite and Skidoo, this waterhole was the only known water source in the sand dune area of the valley. When sand obscured the spot, a length of stovepipe was inserted as a marker. Hence its unique name.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

    Stovepipe Wells

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 9, 2014
    4 more images

    Stovepipe Wells was the first tourist resort in Death Valley. It was opened by Herman "Bob" Eichbaum in 1925. Stovepipe Wells was originally nicknamed Bungalette City. Eichbaum had constructed 20 green and white tent style bungalows, a restaurant, genera store and a pump station. In 1926, the Stovepipe Wells Hotel opened. Several months later a more luxurious hotel opened at Furnace Creek.

    Currently, Stovepipe Wells has two restaurants (they operate out of the same kitchen), bungalows, tent sites, gas station and a general store. Often the tent spots are closed if it is too hot.

    For people camping anywhere in Death Valley there are a few things that are very important. First, all visitors to the general store are given a free bag of ice! Second and just as important, the hotel has a pool with shower. You can purchase a day pass for only $4.00 and have access to the pool and shower all day. This was a huge convenience on my 4 day camping trip as the heat hit 112 degrees each day!

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • PeterVancouver's Profile Photo

    TBA

    by PeterVancouver Written Jun 26, 2005

    Located very close to Stovepipe Wells are the 14-square-mile field of sand dunes.


    Suggestions for your visit:
    The dunes can be explored by foot (park on the side of the road). There is no trail, but that is part of the fun, you can create your own trail. Hiking the dunes is best in the morning or late afternoon as it is cooler. Also at these hours, the dunes are most photogenic. The shadows are longer because the sun is lower in the sky.

    Was this review helpful?

  • SteveOSF's Profile Photo

    Last Touch of Civilization

    by SteveOSF Written Aug 1, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stovepipe Wells

    One of the few points of civilization in the park, Stovepipe Wells hosts a motel (with swimming pool), a gift shop, a gas station, and a restaurant.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    Sand dunes at Stovepipe Wells (2)

    by JanPeter74 Written Apr 21, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Footprints in the sand

    You will have to walk at least 20 minutes or so to be able to shoot a picture like this.

    Only my own footprints in the sand.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • LHOON's Profile Photo

    Sand Dunes

    by LHOON Written Apr 23, 2003
    Sand Dunes

    The sand dunes near Stovepipe Wells seem a bit out of place in a stone desert... one wonders where is the beach!

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Death Valley National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

96 travelers online now

Comments

View all Death Valley National Park hotels