Death Valley National Park Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Yaqui
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Yaqui
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by Yaqui

Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Death Valley National Park

  • 1. Car Care

    ... when you're driving through Death Valley there isn't many places to stop off. So when you are driving through make sure that you have enoguh petrol, and your car is up to check. There are a...

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  • 2. Bring Water!

    I have been to Death Valley several times and I loved it. I was there in mid-May, and it was 100 degrees at Stovepipe Wells. Other places weren't quite that bad. TAKE LOTS OF WATER WITH YOU! Take...

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  • 3. Weather Wise

    US National Park Service offers daily waether reports. As this part of the country can be easily affected by tricky weather conditions (heat or floods), it's highly receommended to check the below...

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  • 4. Wild Burro's

    I am a big fan of wild animals, but when they roam in unprotected areas in herds they become an immediate Danger to THEM and US. We saw lots of mini herds of...

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  • 5. Warnings About the Area

    It is always important to obey warnings signs and warnings provided by the rangers; but never more important than in an environment like Death Valley. A few of...

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  • 6. Flash Flooding on the Roads

    Many travelers may not realize that in the desert we are prone to flash flooding. It can happen in a matter of minutes when it rains really hard in the desert....

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  • 7. Danger - Look for Pedestrians

    Sometimes we all just forget! Traveling a long time in the car can make everyone forget the dangers of parking along the road. YET, pull off fully from the road...

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  • 8. Fifteen Tips for returning safely ...

    It’s easy to overlook the obvious when planning an extended outing. Whether it’s just a weekend with an overnight, or two weeks in the great outdoors, the...

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  • 9. No Cell Phones

    If you are addicted to cell phones, you will be disappointed here. There is virtually no service in Death Valley. That also means that you can not rely on the...

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  • 10. Gas

    Gas is available at Stovepipe Wells and Furnace Creek. Signs were posted that read that gas was no longer available at Scotty's Castle (until further notice -...

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  • 11. Wildlife

    While we saw some wild life, including a coyote, the most destructive animal appeared to be this bird. At Scotty's Castle, he tried dismantling portions of this...

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  • 12. Pets Not Welcome

    As this is a National Park, it is pet unfriendly. According to the National Park Service, pets must always be on a leash or be confined. They may not be left...

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  • 13. Dust and Wind

    Near dusk, this distant sandstorm raged near the Dunes. We could easily see it from the road between Stovepipe Wells and the Scotty's Castle. Fortunately for...

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  • 14. Trona, California

    If traveling from Southern California/Los Angeles to Death Valley, the fastest route is via county roads that diverge just south of Red Rock Canyon, to...

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  • 15. This one could hurt...

    I nearly stumbled right into this little red city while walking back from the well trod Sand Dunes. Then, like a jackass, I got as close as possible for a...

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  • 16. Watch out for Rattlers!

    If hiking in the desert always wear shoes or boots and long trousers and carry a torch for night so as to avoid stepping on the rattlesnakes. Avoid walking in...

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  • 17. Wildlife

    Do not disturb or feed the wildlife, such as coyotes, roadrunners, burros and ravens. If they are fed by humans they will stop searching naturally for their...

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  • 18. Be prepared!

    Its best to stay on the paved roads, especially during summer, but if you do want venture further afield take extra care and check that you have in your car, a...

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  • 19. Don't Feed the Coyotes

    We saw this rather humorous sign while driving through Death Valley National Park. It warns you not feed the park's coyotes. Coyotes may look like dogs, but...

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  • 20. Hiking Dangers

    Always use caution when hiking at low elevations in the park. Carry at least two liters of drinking water in the winter, and four liters in the summer (see my...

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  • 21. FLASH FLOODS

    Most of the time, you are worrying about the horrific heat here and thirst. When it rains, though, other problems come up quickly. The Park Service tries to...

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  • 22. Watch your steps !!

    Hiking in Death Valley is exciting – however, watch your steps when climbing around on the rocks. It can be quite slippery, when you step over the little stones...

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  • 23. Abandoned mines

    DANGER WILL ROBINSON! Abandoned mines may contain any number of hazards, including lack of oxygen, noxious gases, cave-ins, poisonous snakes/spiders, old mining...

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  • 24. Road and trail closures

    Due to the severe floods during the summer, numerous roads and trails remain closed. Hwy 190 is closed east of Furnace Creek, as are Death Valley Junction,...

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  • 25. Those California drivers

    Its a pet peeve of mine that some people insist on speeding through National Parks. Add to this tendency the persona of the typical California driver and you've...

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Death Valley National Park Warnings and Dangers

Reviews and photos of Death Valley National Park warnings and dangers posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Death Valley National Park sightseeing.

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