Fort Rosecrans Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Things to Do in Fort Rosecrans

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    Office and Information Kiosk

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    View from Vistior's Center & Kiosk

    The photo shows the view from the Office and Information Kiosk looking towards the east. Across the street--Catalina Blvd./CA. Highway 209--you'll see the site for burial services.

    When the office has closed, general information can be obtained from the Kiosk which stays open during visiting hours. Simply type in the name of the service man or woman and printed information about the person and about the location they can be found, will be supplied along with a map of the area.

    Office Hours:
    Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
    Closed on Federal Holidays, except Memorial Day and Veteran's Day.

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    Enter By Walking, By Car Or Bicycle

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    East Side Gate

    The public may enter when these gates are open. There are no guided tours, so I will try to give you a sense of the place. To the right there is a plaque, beyond the plaque there are restrooms--American for toilets. Straight ahead is the area where Military Burial Services are held and if you come during such service, be sure to behave respectfully. To the left of the gate is the older section where you will see various styles of headstones, quite different from the regulation Military headstones seen throughout the cemetery.

    On the other side of Catalina Boulevard/California Highway 209, is the West Gate. Here you'll find the Visitor's Center and Headstone Locater, not always manned, so you'll have to do the locating on your own. I tried it once but didn't do it well. I hope you'll have better luck. Beyond of course are more headstones and a beautiful view of the Pacific Ocean.

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    The Bivouac of the Dead!

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    Honoring the Dead

    Bivouac is a temporary encampment, often in an unsheltered area and this poem was written in tribute to those who gave their lives for this country.

    This plaque is located just to right of the gated entrance on the east side. The position of the plaque is inconspicuous and I point it out for any who have had a loved one die while serving their country. The poem is sad, comforting and adds a sense of pride.

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    For Your Convenience

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    A Room With A View

    This may seem an unusual tip, but in this area it can be very useful.

    Just to the right of the east gate entrance you will find the restrooms. They are primative, but serviceable and though there is no glass in the window, the view is lovely.

    These toilets are open to the public so, if the need arises feel free to use them.

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    Full of San Diego's History Too!

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    The Older Section

    On the left side of the east entrance gate the older part of the cemetery is located. The most notable aspect of this section is the various sized and shaped headstones. Quite different from the regimented headstones seen throughout the cemetery and many of these are not actually headstones but rather monuments honoring those who died fighting historical battles and those who died due to horrific events while serving their country.

    It is interesting to note the historical events marked here that most of us have forgotten. This is a great way to refresh historical memory.

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    The Battle of San Pasqual

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    Monument to the San Pasqual Battle

    Here at Fort Rosecrans a boulder from the San Pasqual battle field was placed to memorialize the dead from both sides of this battle.

    Out by the San Diego Wild Animal Park is the San Pasqual Valley where a decisive battle was fought on 6 December 1846, to win California from Mexico.

    The American Army officer, S.W. Kearny, a hundred and twenty of his troops and one of America's great frontiersmen, Kit Carson, fought in this bloodiest of battles against a force of Californios led by General Andres Pico.

    San Pasqual Battlefield State Historic Park is located in Escondido. They have re-enactments of the battle on the Sunday closest to 6 December. The park includes a Visitor Center, a map room, films, a bookstore and nature trails. Admission is free.

    I'll also mention that Kearny is a well known name there even now such as Kearny Mesa, and the many streets in SD County that are named Kearny. Pico is also well known, especially for Casa de Pico, one of San Diego's favorite Mexican restaurants. If you plan on attending the San Pasqual Battle re-enactment, also plan to visit Orfilia winery for a tour.

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    U.S.S. Bennington Memorial!

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    U.S.S. Bennington Memorial

    This is California State Historic Landmark 55, commemorating over half of the ships crew, 102 men, who were injured or killed on the U.S.S. Bennington in a horrific boiler explosion while anchored in San Diego's harbor. Sixty-two sailors, of the 102 who were effected by the blast, were killed or died soon after the event that took place on 21 July 1905. The ship was never repaired and this tragedy ended it's service to the U.S. Navy.

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    The Cemetery!

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    Ft. Rosecrans from the Bay

    Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery is under the authority of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and would be interesting to anyone who has had a loved one die in the U.S. Military, to anyone who is a war history buff and to those who like a spectacular view.

    The cemetery straddles Catalina Bouldevard just before reaching the Cabrillo National Moument, so it could be an interesting stop on the way, or just a profound moment passing by. This view in this photo is from a regular Harbor cruise and shows just a fraction of the area.

    It wasn't until my father was buried here that I noted much about the place. Since then I've visited many times and have been awed by the price these courageous men and women paid for the freedoms I experience today.

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    The U.S. Mormon Battalion!

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 2, 2012

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    Mormon Battalion Memorial

    This is not the only monument to the U.S. Mormon Battalion in the city and county of San Diego. Out in Anza-Borrego Desert there is a marker commemorating this brave group of people who marched 2,000 miles, the longest march in military history, to help the U.S. Army fight in the Mexican - American War. They arrived in San Diego January 1847. In Old Town, there is a U.S. Mormon Battalion Memorial Park as well.

    The Five hundred men and thirty-two women who supported the fight, came because President Brigham Young and the governing Council of the L.D.S. Church deemed it their patriotic duty to join.

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    Gettysburgs National Cemetery Address Monument

    by Yaqui Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    This beautiful monument reads:

    The address by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19, 1863.

    "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
    Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

    But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

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    Ca. Historical Marker No. 55 Fort Rosecrans Cem.

    by Yaqui Written Aug 1, 2010

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    The plaque reads: NO. 55 FORT ROSECRANS NATIONAL CEMETERY - A burial ground before 1847, this graveyard became an Army post cemetery in the 1860s. It is the final resting place for most who fell at San Pasqual in 1846, and for the USS Bennington victims of 1905. It became Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in 1934 and was placed under the Veterans Administration National Cemetery System in 1973. Over 50,000 who served the U.S. honorably in war and peace lie here.

    California Historical Marker NO. 55 FORT ROSECRANS NATIONAL CEMETERY

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    USS Wasp (CV-7) Monument

    by Yaqui Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    The eighth USS Wasp (CV-7) was a United States Navy aircraft carrier that found her demise around 2:44 when three B1 Type Japanese submarine torpedoes where spotted heading three points forward of the starboard beam, although six were fired, three sadly hit her gasoline tanks and magazines area. The Bravery of her crew is carried on in memory and honor with this lovely memorial and those of the other memorials here at Fort Rosecrans.

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    USS Ommaney Bay (CVE–79) Monument

    by Yaqui Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    USS Ommaney Bay (CVE–79) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy, named for Ommaney Bay, Alaska. She left on New Year's Day 1945, two days later while in the Sulu Sea a Japanese suicide plane nicked her island then crashed her starboard side. Two bombs were released; penetrated the flight deck and below, setting off a series of explosions among the fully armed aircraft on the forward third of the hangar deck. The second bomb passed through the hangar deck, ruptured the second deck, and exploded near the starboard side.

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    USS St. Lo (CVE–63) Monument

    by Yaqui Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    USS St. Lo (CVE–63) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy during World War II. On October 25, 1944 St. Lo became the first major warship to sink as the result of a kamikaze attack. Around 1047 a battle began when an air attack by the Shikishima Special Attack Unit in the Gulf of Leyte. A plane flown by Lt. Yukio Seki crashed on the flight deck, penetrating the deck that blew out the port side of the hangar deck where aircraft were being rearmed. After many explosions and fire, the ship sank. The ships crew consisted of 889 souls, but sadly 113 were killed or missing and approximately 30 others died of their wounds. The survivors were rescued from the water by the USS Heermann, USS John C. Butler, USS Raymond, and USS Dennis (which picked up 434 survivors.)

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    USS Bennington (PG-4) Monument

    by Yaqui Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    USS Bennington (PG-4) Monument commemorates the deaths of 62 souls in a boiler explosion on July 21, 1905. The ship had just returned from maneuvers in the Pacific, was anchored in San Diego Harbor. The crew was ordered to depart in search for Wyoming (BM-10), which had lost a propeller at sea. Around 10:30 a.m., an explosion in the boiler room ripped through the ship, killing or wounding the crew. Two days later the fallen were brought here to the area known as Bennington Plot.

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Fort Rosecrans Things to Do

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