Flora / Fauna, Joshua Tree National Park

38 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Flora / Fauna
    by JLBG
  • Flora / Fauna
    by JLBG
  • Flora / Fauna
    by JLBG
  • cherokee49ca's Profile Photo

    Desert Flowers / Stargazing

    by cherokee49ca Updated Mar 30, 2009

    Favorite thing: The Rock formations are really nice to look at and take pictures and they have some pretty nice camp sites......Jumbo Rocks.

    Fondest memory: There were very few flowers in bloom in the month of March i suppose because of lack of rain ......But i did enjoy my one day road trip to the desert and i plan on going back and staying a night in the back of my truck with an airbed and watch the stars.

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Buckhorn Cholla, spines

    by JLBG Updated May 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Buckhorn Cholla has cylindrical stems which lead to give it the new name of Cylindropuntia acanthocarpa, leaving the name Opuntia to the Cholla with paddles. It has not as many spines as the Teddy Bear Cholla and they are longer and stiffer.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    A Teddy Bear cactus

    by JLBG Updated May 17, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Teddy Bear cactus (Opuntia Bigelovii, now named (Cylindropuntia Bigelovii) is also called Jumping Cholla. You will very fast understand why the name of Jumping Cholla . As soon as you look at it, there is one that catches you ! No wonder that it is not a popular indoor plant ! Actually, the Jumping Cholla does not jump but it has so many long and soft (soft and prickling all together !) spines that though you feel you are enough away, YOU catch it. If you take care, you will be able to admire it's beautiful yellow flowers.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Bladderpod

    by JLBG Written May 16, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Bladderpod, Isomeris arborea is an evergreen shrub, 3-4" height. This perennial plant, native to the Baja and Mohave regions of California, grows from coastal regions up to the elevation of 4000 feet. The plant produces abundant yellow flowers year round, regardless of water. The fruit forms into attractive long capsules, hence the name "Bladderpod". The plant is best left untouched because the scent is generally found unpleasant. It is also the favorite habitat of the Harlequin beetle.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Evening primrose

    by JLBG Written May 16, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Evening primrose or Fragrant Evening Primrose, Oenothera caespitosa produces blooms for a few weeks. The fragrant white flowers, 3 inches in diameter (7.5 cm), open in the evening and last only until the following morning, from mid spring to late summer.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Desert mallow

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Desert Mallow, Sphaeralcea ambigua is a two foot perennial with many one inch orange flowers on a two to three foot spike with gray almost fuzzy foliage. Desert Hollyhock is another name for the flower spikes that can occur most of the year in Joshua Tree. Desert Mallow needs sun and good air flow. It grows throughout the deserts from Baja Calif. to Utah.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Desert dandelion and Sacred Datura

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The flowering heads of the desert dandelion are large and showy, pale to bright yellow

    The large white flower is Sacred Datura, Datura wrightii (Solanaceae family), the only one I saw in bloom. Its enormous white trumpet flowers have a sweet smell. It blooms at night starting early evening and fading before next noon. It is pollinated by nocturnal visitors, usually sphinx or hawk moths It is found in western Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, southern California, Mexico, and the West Indies and grows within an elevation range between sea level and 6,500 feet. The name Datura, its generic name, is from the Hindu Dhatura (dhat = the eternal essence [of God])..

    The tea from Datura is extremely hallucinogenic. The hallucinogenic effects are reported to be stronger than Peyote, Psyillicibin, or LSD. However, Datura is also very toxic and can be deadly. It is apparently Scopolamine that produces the hallucinogenic effects, but the Sacred Datura contains also high concentrations of highly toxic Atropine, Hyoscyamine.

    When Datura is used in a Native American ritual, it is always under the guidance of an individual of certain tribal spiritual resolve such as a Medicine person or tribal elder. These experts on the use of the plant know what other plants to add in order to neutralize the harmful effects. They also know how much to administer and when and where to pick the plants, such as age, season, time of year, whether under a full moon or no moon at all. Chemical constituents and levels vary greatly from plant to plant, time of year, and from one area to another just generally, but especially so if the plants are obtained through ritual or from a spot known for having special powers, or sacred grounds. The plants are very toxic, poisonous and lethal, especially if consumed in quantities not monitored by someone versed in their safe administration.

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Desert dandelion

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Desert dandelion grows in coarse desert soils, dry sandy plains, washes and among shrubs in creosote bush scrub, Joshua tree woodland and shadscale scrub to 6000', and occasionally in some of the inner cismontane valleys from San Diego County to Santa Barbara County. It blooms from March to June and when rainfall has been sufficient sometimes covers the desert with yellow.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Desert dandelion

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: While driving on the main road, you might notice that the banks of the highway are sometimes covered by thousands of yellow flowers. They are Desert dandelion or Malacothrix glabrata. Desert dandelion is a few-branched, glabrous annual growing to about 16" tall.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Bigelow's monkey flower

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Bigelow's monkey flower, Mimulus Bigelovii, is a Scrophulariaceae that grows in dry sandy washes and canyons between 1,300 m and 2,500 m., on rocky desert slopes, creosote bush scrub. It blooms between March to June.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Silver torch cactus, the flowers

    by JLBG Updated May 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The purplish-red, tubular flowers of the Silver torch cactus are borne along the length of the body in the spring. The Silver torch cactus is one of the cactus that are popular and often grown for its flowers. There are several cultivation varieties.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Silver torch cactus

    by JLBG Updated May 15, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Silver torch cactus, Cleistocactus strausii, is a beautiful, quick-growing species whose stems can reach a height of 10 feet with a diameter of 21/2 inches. The silver torch cactus is clothed in pretty silver spines. It grows singly when young, clumping when mature.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Buckhorn Cholla

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Buckhorn Cholla, Opuntia acanthocarpa is now named Cylindropuntia acanthocarpa This light green cholla, also called silver cholla, is widespread in Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah. It grows naturally in dry, rocky desert slopes at elevations between 500 and 4,000 feet. The spine sheaths are inconspicuous and light colored. It can grow to a height of 3-10 feet.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Teddy Bear cactus, fruits

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The fruits are egg-shaped, yellow to red, up to 1 inch long. As most fruits of Opuntia cactus, they are edible once the spines have been removed or the skin peeled out. The flavor ranges from sour to sweet

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Teddy Bear cactus, the spines

    by JLBG Written May 15, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This photo shows a close-up on the spines of the Teddy Bear cactus. They are barbed spines that are very sharp and brittle, and very easily detached. This is why they "jump" on you when you get too close ! Pay attention !

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Joshua Tree National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

58 travelers online now

Comments

View all Joshua Tree National Park hotels