La Mesa Things to Do

  • Early morning before the big event
    Early morning before the big event
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  • Celebrating Oktoberfest in La Mesa
    Celebrating Oktoberfest in La Mesa
    by lmkluque
  • Things to Do
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Things to Do in La Mesa

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    Mission Trails Regional Park~Lake Murray

    by Yaqui Written Mar 22, 2014

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    What a lovely oasis within the city. Lake Murray is a very well loved feature of this community. My sister lives just around the corner and she comes to here jog and ride her bicycle all the time with her friends. Lots of wonderful things to do here like boat, kayak, fish, picnic, camp, jog, bike, or just come to feed all the beautiful ducks.

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    Reading Cinemas-Grossmont Center 10

    by lmkluque Updated Jun 20, 2012
    Just beyond these buildings

    Going to the movies while on holiday is not the most usual thing, but there are times that it's really hot in La Mesa, so sitting in an air conditioned theater during the hottest part of the day can be a wonderful experience, especially if it is a film you really wanted to see in English. Sometimes they have concerts here too.

    Check at the website listed below to find out which movies are playing during your visit as well as the price of a ticket and the times scheduled.

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    Pacific Southwest Railway Museum

    by lmkluque Updated Jun 20, 2012
    La Mesa Depot
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    The La Mesa Depot is located near the Spring Street Trolley station. It is only open on Saturdays between the hours of 1 pm and 4 pm. The Depot is the oldest building in La Mesa. It has moved a couple of times, changed purposes several times and has changed owners several times. It now belongs to the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum Association and the property is owned and maintained by the City of La Meas and the La Mesa Historical Society.

    This is a great musuem to take kids to. Climbing on the old trains is fascinating and inspires their imagination. Best of all, admission is Free!

    Now, if you are a serious train buff and would like to ride one of the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum's trains, just go to the Campo Depot website to see their scheduled train rides.

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    Oktoberfest In La Mesa

    by lmkluque Updated Oct 6, 2011

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    Early morning before the big event
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    What luck! Just as I'm preparing to build a page about La Mesa it happens to be the same time as their Oktoberfest.

    Three days at the beginning of October they hold this celebration and it seems to be their biggest event of the year. Cars parked in every spot on every street--except the blocked off streets used for merchant stalls--all around the Village and flows out to the residential streets in every direction for at least a half mile radius. They say this is their biggest event of the year and I believe that. I don't know how many people went this weekend, but in past years as many as 200,000 people have attended this event.

    This "street party" lasts for three days and nights. This year (2011) it was; Friday, 30 September, Saturday, 1 October and Sunday, 2 October.

    If you are in San Diego about this time of year, you might consider jumping on the SD Trolley--Green Line--- take it to Grossmont Center station and transfer to the Orange Line, this will take you to the Spring Street station, which is located in the middle of the event, at Spring St. and La Mesa Blvd.

    Even if you have the use of a car, I'd still suggest taking the Trolley. Finding a legal parking spot will be a big pain during Octoberfest!

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    Heartland Youth for Decency Memorial Park

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    Located right next to the American Legion 282 (J.A Park Memorial building 1947) is a park dedicated to all Veterans who have served and who have sacrificed their lives.

    Top Plaque (facing the parking lot):
    We of Heartland Youth Of Decency
    Dedicated This Monument To The Young Men
    From Our Own Generation Have Given
    Their Lives That We Might Be Free

    Middle Plaque
    Flay Day
    June 14 1970

    Top Plaque (Facing Building:)
    No Greater Love for Man....
    Three plaques with the names of those who have fallen.

    Top Plaque (Facing Track)

    O Lord Lest I Go My Complacent Way
    Help Me To Remember That Somewhere Out There
    A Man Died For Me Today
    So Lone As There Be War, I Must Ask
    And Answer, Am I Worth Dying For?

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    Rev. Henry A. McKinney House 1899

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    Home to the La Mesa Historical Society since 1977, the McKinney House serves as a good example of semi-rural, middle-class life in La Mesa at the turn of the twentieth century. The McKinney family moved to this area, then known as Allison Springs, in 1899. Reverend McKinney served as one of the first ministers of the La Mesa Methodist Episcopal Church and was an early businessman, lemon rancher, town librarian and school trustee. His wife Florence McKinney was noted for her work in the church.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    Old Post Office 1939

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    The Old Post Office Building at the southwest corner of La Mesa Boulevard and 4th Street was constructed in 1939. It was designed by noted local architect Frank L. Hope, Sr. in the Art Moderne style and is the first commercial building to achieve local landmark status in La Mesa. The contractor, Weston Hicks, and property owner, George Sheldon, were early civic leaders. The windows and corner entry are the most notable features; glass blocks surround the front door and the metal-framed windows are tall and narrow.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    James C.and Ellen Robertson House 1920

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    The same family who owned the adjacent landmark property at 4572 Palm Avenue built this modest bungalow in 1909. Brothers Harry and John Robertson were in the construction business and built many of the homes in the area, including this one for their father, who ran the local shoe repair shop. In the 1920s, the house was home to Algot Swanson, owner of the Hardy Meat Market. Mr. Swanson served on the City’s Board of Trustees for two years and was an advocate for local park, sewer and water services.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    Robertson House 1910

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    The two-story Robertson House was built in 1910 and remains largely unchanged from its original appearance. A number of craftsman-style features are evident, including a front porch, shed dormer and exposed rafter tails. Notable owners include Sarah Pinkston, who survived a devastating Civil War raid in Kansas, served as a delegate to the National Convention of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, and wrote articles for county and state papers in Kansas.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    Harry & Vada Robertson House 1909

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    The residence at 4582 Palm Avenue appears in a 1909 birds-eye view of La Mesa and on a postcard dated July 19, 1910. It was originally a small, square building with a hipped roof and a small gable dormer over the front door. A front porch was added in 1911. Harry and Vada Robertson built the house and were the first occupants. Harry Robertson’s parents, James C. and Ellen Robertson, lived next door at 4580 Palm Avenue. Brothers Harry and John Robertson were in the construction business and built a number of homes in the area. Ezekiel and Olette Hanson were the second owners of the residence (1917-1934). Between 1935 and 1936, the house was occupied with borders. Subsequent owners include long-time occupants Benjamin and Mattie Bulen (1941-1955) and Francis and Cassie Hinton (1958-1980).

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    Helen & Bill Givens Memorial

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    Located at the Southeast corner of Spring Street and La Mesa Boulevard in the La Mesa Village, this memorial was dedicated in 2004 to Helen & Bill Givens in honor of their numerous contributions to the City.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    La Mesa Walkway of the Stars

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    The “Walkway of the Stars” is a pedestrian walkway that has been transformed into an urban park in downtown La Mesa. The vision for a place to recognize La Mesa's extraordinary volunteers was provided by Councilmember Ruth Sterling. The park’s theme honors the City’s outstanding volunteers who have provided 10,000 or more hours of service to the City of La Mesa. “Walkway of the Stars” is located between the Allison Avenue municipal parking lot and La Mesa Boulevard. The walkway was renamed “Walkway of the Stars” in 2003 and features decorative stone stars with the names of volunteers who have achieved this high standard:

    The first honoree was volunteer extraordinaire - Alice Larson. Alice’s bronze star graces the entrance to the walkway. When her star was dedicated on a June 2003 morning, Alice had contributed over 13,000 hours of volunteer service to the City. Her spirit of “giving back” to her community signifies what this walkway is about. In fact, Alice is still giving to the City by working at City Council meetings.

    The 2nd ceremony in July 2006 honored two volunteers who worked in the Police Department. One was Anthony D. Guggenheimer who volunteered over 10,000 hours in the RSVP program. The second star was for Timothy S. Tarbuk for over 12,500 hours in the Police Reserve Program.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    La Mesa Walk of Fame

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    If you happen to be strolling downtown make sure to look down at the sidewalk and you'll see some lovely plaques in honor of those who have contributed many hours of service to their community.

    La Mesa Walk of Fame Recipients:

    Elmer Drew moved to La Mesa with his family in 1912. He started working as a young man in an automobile repair shop. He later acquired that shop and continued to expand his experience and customer base. The Ford Motor Company subsequently approached Elmer in 1934 to open a dealership. The Drew Ford dealership has become one of La Mesa’s oldest and most successful businesses. Elmer Drew was admitted to the City of La Mesa Walk of Fame on April 28, 1998.

    At the age of six months, Dr. Ellen Ochoa and her family moved to La Mesa. Dr. Ochoa is a graduate of Grossmont High School and San Diego State University, where she was her graduating class Valedictorian. She then went on to Stanford University where she earned her Master and Doctorate degrees. Selected by NASA in 1990, Dr. Ochoa became the world's first Hispanic female astronaut in 1991 as a member of the STS-56 Space Shuttle “Endeavor.” Dr. Ellen Ochoa was added to the City of La Mesa Walk of Fame on April 28, 1998.

    Sarah A. Couts was one of the key historic figures in the San Diego region. She dedicated 40 years to the service of others during her longtime residency in La Mesa. She was a founding force behind the construction of Grossmont Hospital and the La Mesa Youth Center at MacArthur Park. Sarah A. Couts was added to the City of La Mesa’s Walk of Fame on April 28, 1998.

    Bill Walton graduated from Helix High School and was a three-time recipient of the N.C.A.A. player of the year award. He earned two championship N.B.A. titles and was inducted into the basketball hall of fame. He is also the recipient of two Emmy awards for his efforts in broadcasting and filmmaking. Bill Walton was added to the City of La Mesa’s Walk of Fame on September 9, 2003.

    Ed and Sandra Burr founded EDCO Disposal Corporation in 1954 in La Mesa. EDCO has grown into the largest family-owned and -operated waste collection and recycling firm in the United States. Mrs. Burr represents EDCO’s numerous charitable interests and continues to contribute to the vitality of the San Diego region. Sandra Burr was added to the City of La Mesa’s Walk of Fame on September 9, 2003.

    J.O. Orsborn resided in La Mesa his entire life and was a well-known member of the community. At the age of 15, in 1941, he began his career as a volunteer fireman with the La Mesa Fire Department. He was appointed Fire Chief in 1981. Chief Orsborn retired in 1990 after 46 years of service. He served with the California Fire Chiefs Association, Fire Training Officer’s Division, and Pioneer Hook & Ladder Museum in San Diego. J.O. also was active with San Diego Boy Scouts, serving in various capacities and was awarded the Silver Beaver Medal for his long service. J. O. Orsborn was added to the City of La Mesa Walk of Fame on May 22, 2007.

    James Culbert was known worldwide in sprint car racing circles as a builder, seller and driver of sprint and super-modified cars. In the late 1940s, he founded Culbert Automotive Engineering (CAE) that evolved into an auto racing superstore. James was also the record holder for speed in sprint and modified roadsters, and in 1957 he was the first driver to exceed 200 mph in a sprint car. Shortly before his death in 2004, Mr. Culbert was inducted into the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Iowa. James Culbert was added to the City of La Mesa Walk of Fame on June 12, 2007.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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    La Mesa Depot 1894

    by Yaqui Updated May 29, 2010

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    The original portion of the Depot was built in 1894, 18 years prior to the incorporation of the City. The Depot enjoys special significance not only for its age, but also for its direct connection with the early citrus and avocado industry that gave the town its start. Local farmers brought their produce to the station (and to nearby packing warehouses) for shipment. Shipping and passenger services had waned by 1930, and this structure was relocated to Lakeside, where it temporarily housed a chicken coop and a worm farm. Local railroad enthusiasts, along with the City, helped reinstate the Depot alongside its track in 1981 where today it serves as the La Mesa Depot Museum.

    La Mesa City Hall
    8130 Allison Avenue
    La Mesa, CA 91942
    619-463-6611

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