Lassen Volcanic National Park Things to Do

  • Brokeoff Mountain Trail the day after Thanksgiving
    Brokeoff Mountain Trail the day after...
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  • Reflection Lake
    Reflection Lake
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  • Reflection Lake
    Reflection Lake
    by Basaic

Most Recent Things to Do in Lassen Volcanic National Park

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    Loomis Museum

    by Basaic Written Oct 2, 2012

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    Loomis Museum
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    Loomis Museum was started in 1927 and provides informative displays showing the geological and historical story of the area. The museum also serves as a visitors center, a gift shop and a bookstore. Hours are 9 AM to 5 PM from Memorial Day through Halloween.

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    Manzanita Lake

    by Basaic Written Oct 2, 2012

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    Manzanita Lake
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    Near the western entrance to the park is the trailhead for the Manzanita Lake Trail a 1.5 mile loop around Manzanita Lake. Manzanita Lake was formed about 350 years ago when an unstable edge of the lava dome called Chaos Crags collapsed and boulders blocked Manzanita Creek to form this pretty lake.

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    Stops Along the Interpretive Trail

    by Basaic Written Oct 2, 2012
    Table Mountain
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    The interpretive trail around the Reflecting Lake and Lily Pond tells the story of the recovery of this area after the 1915 eruptions. Unlike the Devastated Area, which emphasizes the geological aspects of the eruption, this trail emphasizes the botanical and zoological side of the recovery.

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    Devastated Area

    by Basaic Written Sep 29, 2012

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    Devastated Area Trail
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    Another of the most interesting attractions in the park is the Devastated Area. This is a part of the valley that was destroyed in the 19 May 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak. A 1/2 mile wide path of lava, melted snow and other debris roared down the mountain, over another ridge, and into Hat Creek Valley. Some of the highlights of the trail through the devastated area include: A several ton "hot rock" that was thrown from the center of the volcano into the devastated area; so-called "puzzle rocks" that fractured into puzzle pieces as they rapidly cooled after the eruption; an interesting phenomena called "quenched blobs" where hotter basalt magma infiltrated, and became imbedded in, dacite magma; you can also see the difference between newer rocks formed during the 1915 eruption and older rocks formed during the first eruption of Lassen Peak some 27,000 years ago; The last thing here is a 27,000 year old Red Dacite Rock that was formed during the first eruption of the volcano and brought 3 miles to the devastated area in 1915. This trail is handicapped accessible.

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    knigs Creek

    by Basaic Written Sep 29, 2012

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    Kings Creek
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    Kings Creek used to be called Hat Creek. It was important to the life of the Atsugewi Indians who inhabited this part of what is now Lassen Volcanic National Park. There is a nice roadside overlook here showing both Kings Creek and the Upper Meadow. This is also the trailhead for the Kings Creek Trails which splits into a horse trail (longer but not as steep) and a foot trail. These trails also connect to other trails to other sights. The 2.4 mile round-trip trail to Kings Creek Trail (a 50 foot high falls) is worth the effort.

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    Terrace Lakes

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Terrace Lake

    The three lakes along the Terrace Lakes Trail vary in size, depth and shoreline features. The first one you reach on the trail is the beautiful Terrace Lake; which is about .6 miles roundtrip. The trail between the lakes can get fairly steep then it levels out as you near the lakes

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    Lassen Peak From Terrace Lakes Trail

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Lassen Peak From Terrace Lakes Trail
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    Lassen Peak formed some 27,000 years ago as a volcanic vent to the huge Brokeoff Volcano (also called Mount Tehana). It is one of the world's largest plug dome volcanoes rising 2000 feet above the surrounding terrain to an elevation of 10,457 feet. If want a nice photo of Lassen Peak; but you do not have the energy to climb it via the Lassen Peak Trail, you can drive a bit further east along the road to Terrace Lakes and get a nice view there.

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    Sulfur Link

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Sulphur Link
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    The yellow pyramid-shaped crystals here are sulfur. This sulfur was formed when the lava rock was dissolved and altered by sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid is linked to sulfur dioxide gas from the magma that fires Bumpass Hell. You will also notice the rotten egg smell characteristic of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas.

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    Mudpots

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Mudpot

    This is a mudpot, a hydrothermal feature between a boiling spring and a fumarole. A mudpot has less water than a boiling spring and more than a fumarole. In wetter times a mudpot can become a boiling spring as the mud thins out and in drier periods they can become a fumarole. Some of what makes up the mudpots boiled up from underground.

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    Mount Tehama/Brokeoff Volcano

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Where Mount Tehama Was
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    Between 400,000 and 600,000 years ago, Mount Tehama (also called Brokeoff Volcano) formed through a series of volcanic eruptions. This huge mountain stretched from what is now Mount Conard to Pilot Pinnacle. About 10,000 years ago, a series of volcanic eruptions caused Mount Tehama to crumble forming the bowl you see here. This interesting stop is along the Bumpass Trail.

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    Bumpass Hell

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Bumpass Hell
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    Bumpass Hell was named after one of the first white men in the area Kendal Vanhook Bumpass, who along with his partner, Major Pierson B. Reading made a claim on this area hoping to capitalize on the minerals and turn it into a tourist attraction. Bumpass lost a leg when he accidently broke through the thin crust into a boiling mud pool. At 16 acres, Bumpass Hell is the largest upward-flowing hydrothermal feature in the park. Here you can see: Boiling Springs; Mudpots; Fumaroles; and other interesting features.

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    Emerald Lake

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Emerald Lake
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    Emerald Lake is a glacial lake that was named for the abundant green algae growing at the bottom of the warm, shallow lake, unlike deeper, cooler glacial lakes that are an aqua blue. Formed at the head of a valley glacier, Emerald Lake was originally fishless but years ago the lake was stocked with Rainbow Trout. Today, Park Managers are eradicating the trout as an alien species to try and save the endangered Cascade Frog. Emerald Lake, and the area around it, is also quite beautiful.

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    Sulphur Works

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Sulphur Works
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    Sulphur Works is near the entrance at the Southwest Corner of the park. This hydrothermal feature is one of the indicators that there is still active magma under this area. This is believed to be the old location of the peak of Brokeoff Volcano.

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    Meet the People

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Ranger Amy

    As always, I enjoyed talking to the people I met along the way; both rangers and fellow travelers. I took pictures of three rangers but one in the group shot did not wish to be on the Internet. This is Amy one of the rangers.

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    Kohm Yah-Mah-Nee Visitors Center

    by Basaic Written Sep 22, 2012

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    Kohm Yah-Mah-Nee Visitors Center

    The visitors center for Lassen Volcanic National Park is located in the Southwest corner of the park along California Highway 89. Here you can get a brochure and newspaper for the park; look over maps; and get recommendations from the helpful rangers on how to best enjoy your visit based on your interests and the amount of time you have to visit. Hours are 9 AM to 6 PM daily from Memorial Day through October 31st and 9 AM to 5 PM the rest of the year. I am posting my tips using this entrance as the starting point and following the main road to the West Entrance.

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Lassen Volcanic National Park Things to Do

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